Note: do not email me unless you would like a personalized protocol (free with a suggested donation of $250 towards maintaining this site). Instead, please take the time to research the information on this site that I have made available to you for no cost to you, and take charge of your own health instead of delegating it to someone else and then just trying to chat with them without making the necessary changes to your diet and lifestyle that require a lot of self-discipline and learning on your part. People have wasted thousands of hours of my time (I get several hundred emails/day, many of them continuing chain emails from this site) because they wanted me to do some research on the internet for answers to their questions, or wanted me to retype the information that is already on my website piece-meal into emails -- probably because I did not charge them for my time. I will not do this any more. Colleagues charge $650 for a 15 minute consultation, and say that people are sending countless emails for every aspect of everything that they should be looking up themselves because it doesn't cost them anything. 

Unfortunately, most people won't even take the time to read a book (or the information on my website) even if their very life depends upon it! Many people even emailed me and wanted me to retype the very same information that is on my website and in Dr. Blaylock's book into emails (most of which they did not bother to read, even after I spent what little "free" time I had rehashing the same information and sending it piecemeal); they then decided that it was too much "work" to take supplements and blenderize their vegetables in a Vitamix every day. The information you need is here: please read it and use it! There is no easy way out of reading and learning what you need to do to help save your life by simply talking for a few minutes on the phone or exchanging a couple of emails: you're trying to undo a lifetime of bad habits and it's going to take some work, and after you beat the cancer, you are still going to have to follow a very good diet and lifestyle and take supplements (fewer than when you had active cancer, but still substantial) to help keep the cancer from returning. Instead of emailing me, please read all my health-related web pages, along with Dr. Blaylock's books, Newsmax articles and subscription newsletters (see my main cancer page for links) and Jerry Brunetti's interviews. One person with Stage 4 cancer that had metastasized throughout her body actually called and asked me if she could take only one supplement (and without even radically changing her diet and lifestyle) to cure herself of cancer! Unfortunately, many people email and call without even taking the time to read the information that I've spent so much time to make available to all, at no charge, and then expect me to rehash the same information that they would already know if they were not too lazy to read the material first. My time is very limited.

Quick Index

  1. Eat Right for Your Metabolism, Not Your Blood Type -- Dr. Rowen
  2. Curing Incurable Cancer! -- Dr. Rowen
  3. Metabolic Eating by Harold J. Kristal, D.D.S. with Jessica A. Lewis
  4. Biochemical Individuality
  5. Metabolic Typing
  6. Shattering Nutritional MYTHs With Metabolic Typing
  7. Metabolic Typing: Calcium Is Not For Everyone
  8. Minerals: Individualized Biochemical Considerations
  9. Vitamin C as ascorbic acid acidies oxidative metabolic types and alkalize autonomic types, while calcium ascorbate (buffered vitamin c) does the opposite
  10. Ascorbic Acid or Calcium Ascorbate (Best Forms of Vitamin C for Different Metabolic Types)
  11. Mineral CARRIERS or Best Forms for each metabolic type
  12. Metabolic Typing and Calcium (Osteoporosis)
  13. Not All Supplements Are Equal
  14. Balancing Your pH
  15. Dr. Kelley on which foods and supplements are best for Parasympathetics vs Sympathetics
  16. Nutritional Individuality & Metabolic Typing
  17. Nick Gonzalez' website regarding metabolic typing, enzymes, supplements and lifestyle changes and their effect upon cancer
  18. Metabolic Typing Explanation and Diets by Walter Last
  19. Why You Are Different From Every Other Person On Earth
  20. Killing a cancer tumor is not necessarily the same as obtaining good health
  21. Interview with Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez
  22. Cancer's Enema No. 1? Make That 2 (Dr. Gonzalez)
  23. Our Approach to Cancer in General (Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez)
  24. Fighting Disease Vs. Building Health
  25. The Metabolic Typing Diet (Dr. Wolcott)
  26. Metabolic Typing
  27. About Metabolic Typing
  28. Eat for Your Metabolic Type, Not for Your Blood Type (Dr. Kristal)
  29. Diabetes, Cancer and Weight: A Metabolic Typing Survey
  30. Allopathic Nutrition versus Metabolic Nutrition
  31. Case Studies Regarding Allopathic Nutrition vs Metabolic Nutrition
  32. Dr. Revici’s Approach to Cancer: A Metabolic Typing Perspective
  33. There is a widespread belief abroad that most people are too acid and need to be alkalized (also search this page for "too alkaline")
  34. Metabolic Typing and Bioavailability
  35. Calcium and Osteoporosis
  36. Which Vitamin C is Best for You: Ascorbic Acid or Calcium Ascorbate?
  37. Vitamin C and Metabolic Typing
  38. Venous Blood Acid/Alkaline Testing
  39. The Confusion of Vegetarianism
  40. Pottenger, Watson, and Kelley, Revisited
  41. Oxygen, Carbon Dioxide and the Krebs Cycle: A Metabolic Typing Perspective
  42. Diabetes and Cancer: A Metabolic Typing Survey
  43. My Nutritional Odyssey: Part II (Dr. Kristal)
  44. Diagnosis and Disease
  45. Do Genes Determine Disease?
  46. Night and Day: Anabolic and Catabolic
  47. Survey: Metabolic Type Linked To Cancer & Diabetes
  48. Metabolic Typing and Blood pH
  49. Metabolic Typing and Chronic Diseases
  50. The End is the Beginning
  51. Understanding the Dominance Factor
  52. Variations in Nutrition
  53. The G.I. Connection
  54. Sources for more information and Free Metabolic Typing Tests
  55. Metabolic Nutrition Self-Test Kit
  56. Dr. Kristal's Metabolic Supplement Formulas
  57. Dr. Wolcott's Metabolic Supplement Formulas


Eat Right for Your Metabolism, Not Your Blood Type -- Dr. Rowen

Dr. Kelley cured himself of pancreatic cancer, which to this day is still incurable by conventional medicine, by eating an almost totally vegetarian diet, along with spiritual elements and supplements. When his wife became very ill, he tried the same diet on her and she became much sicker and almost died until he tried a last-ditch effort of giving her a lot of meat. She quickly recovered. Dr. Kelley spent many years investigating various metabolic types of people and what types of foods and supplements would keep each type in optimum health. You might have heard that everyone needs to alkalinize their bodies to recover from cancer by eating certain “alkaline” foods. Some types, such as parasympathetic dominant people, are actually too alkaline and need to be acidified!

Atkins, Pritikin, the “Zone Diet,” the “Blood-type Diet,” it’s all enough to make you crazy, yes? It made me a bit crazy, too. For years, I thrived on a diet of vegetables and complex carbohydrates with eggs and occasional fish for protein. I’ve been the ideal weight for my height (5-10/155) ever since high school and rather healthy at that. So I thought if all my patients ate like me, they also would be healthy and fit. Problem is, when I taught patients to eat my diet, many came back saying, “Dr. Rowen, I’m doing everything you recommended to the letter, but not only can I not lose weight, I don’t feel very good either.” Low energy was the most common complaint.

I was perplexed. Then I read about Robert Atkins’ high-protein / low­ carbohydrate diet. Yes, it did indeed work for some, but for others (including myself), I knew it would be a disaster. Why didn’t one diet work for everybody? After all, we’re all human.

In the 1980s, I became aware of the work of Dr. William Donald Kelley — a man who helped patients with cancer in an extraordinary way. He worked on the principle that meat and protein caused the body to acidify and fruit and vegetables made the body more alkaline. By altering the patient’s diet for the patient’s metabolism, he could bring their pH into proper balance and very often the patients went into remission.

Several years ago, I heard a lecture from another researcher, Rudolph Wiley, PhD, author of the book Biobalance. Wiley claimed meat and protein were alkalinizing and fruit and vegetables in general were acidifying. This flew in the face of everything I had been taught regarding the effects of food on pH, and directly contradicted Kelley’s work.

Then, two years ago, I was given a rare book that’s now out of print called Nutrition and Your Mind by Dr. George Watson. He found (two decades before Wiley) the same findings Wiley published (that meat is alkalinizing). Watson showed how subtle shifts in pH through diet and supplements would normalize pH in mentally ill individuals and, when corrected, the patient’s mental disorder completely cleared or at least improved.

All three men had done impeccable research, but all their theories couldn’t be right? Or could they?

Today, we have several competing and conflicting diets, which must work for some or they never would have gotten off the ground. Yet none of them works for everyone. How does one make sense from all this?

In his book, “The Metabolic Typing Diet”, William Wolcott, a protégé of Kelley, explains his dominance theory of individual metabolism. There are two competing determinants of metabolism in the body: the autonomic (unconscious) nervous system (ANS) and the oxidative system. Foods and nutrients have opposing effects on body pH in each. For example, everyone knows that potassium and magnesium are alkalinizing — or are they?

The ANS has two parts, sympathetic and parasympathetic. The latter controls digestion, tends to unwind the system, and promotes alkalinization of the body when it’s active. The sympathetic branch winds us up, gets adrenaline pumping, and tends to acidify the body when active.

Potassium and magnesium are required to activate the parasympathetic side, promoting alkalinization of the body. But here’s where the science gets tricky. In the biochemical cycles of energy production, the oxidative system, these two minerals tend to speed up reactions, which lead to acid production in the body. Therefore, the two systems tend to balance each other out with regards to pH. Wolcott teaches that, “The net effect of pH depends on which system is dominant in the given individual!”

All of a sudden, it made sense to me how and why one diet that worked so well for one person would fail miserably for another, and why my vegetarian-style diet made me feel great and made others feel terrible. We are all different, and the same food may have opposite effects in two different people. A seminar by Hal Kristal, DDS, of California, confirmed what I had discovered.

While living in Alaska for almost 20 years, I watched the Alaskan natives, so robust and healthy just two generations ago, slowly become heavy and riddled with diabetes and chronic diseases of “civilization.” When I first moved there, they were predominately meat eaters, living off the land. Now meat is supposed to be bad, isn’t it? But for them, they thrived with scant degenerative disease. Now they are eating out of local stores which have all the carbohydrate-laden foods for which their systems were never designed. And their metabolic type can’t handle it. But for others, including me, such a heavy meat-and-fat diet could spell ruin.

With today’s epidemic of obesity, knowing your metabolic type is of paramount importance. For example, if you are one with a parasympathetic dominance and you are already alkaline, eating foods that further stimulate the parasympathetic system (vegetarian based) will only push you into further imbalance. If, on the other hand, you are oxidative dominant and a “slow” oxidizer, your alkalinity will be balanced by a vegetarian-based diet. It will provide the vitamins and minerals you need to speed up oxidation and generate more acids to balance you out.

Herein lies the secret of why one diet works for some but not others. And why a holistic doctor like I can recommend a heavy meat/fat diet for some of my patients, instead of the vegetable/grain diet that’s supposed to be “good for everyone.” What makes one more alkaline might make another more acidic.

But why does this work? Two reasons: First, for some, their metabolism is heavily weighted toward certain fuels for energy. Genetics play a significant role. If the need fuels are present, combustion within the cell furnaces proceeds optimally. If the wrong fuels are present, substances pile up and throw the cells off balance. Consider an auto assembly line where four wheels are needed but eight show up for each car: eventually, the whole factory backs up. With many generations of a given people living in one place, they develop metabolisms that matched their food supply.

Second, the hormone insulin, which controls blood sugar, has to be considered. Some genetic types were granted a “thrifty gene” that stores fuel to pare the body in times of famine. This gene is great when food is scarce, but when a food is plentiful, it causes the body to become loaded down with stored fat. The gene works through the overproduction of insulin, which quickly clears blood sugar (from carbohydrates), converting the glucose to triglycerides and fats for storage. As long as insulin is around, carbs are headed into the fat-storage depot. The only significant stimulus for insulin is ingestion of carbohydrates, with refined carbs and sugars being the worst of the insulin stimulators. (The body has an abhorrence for high blood sugar since it causes damage to blood vessels.) For these people, there are only two alternatives to get rid of the fat-storing insulin: cutting down or completely eliminating the carbohydrate stimulus, or burning the carbs through exercise.

How do you know what type you are? There are four basic types: Sympathetic Dominant; Parasympathetic Dominant; Oxidative Fast; and Oxidative Slow. The good news is that there are only two basic diets, the degree of adherence which is determined by the degree of dominance of one of the above. Oxidative Fast and Parasympathetic Dominants need a Group II diet, or one heavily weighted toward heavy protein and fat as a preferred fuel source. Sympathetic Dominants (myself) and Oxidative Slows need a Group I diet, which is more heavily weighted toward light, non-fatty proteins, an abundance of vegetables and a greater tolerance for carbohydrates, although neither group should be eating refined carbs. Some people are blessed to be balanced and have much greater dietary freedom.

A quick way to tell for many people is a simple look at a fasting blood test at the value of triglycerides (fats). While the “reference range” may go from 0-160, I believe that any value over 80 suggests excess insulin activity converting excess carbs in that individual to fats, with higher levels ever more strongly pointing to the same. These people would most likely do well on a Group II or low-carbohydrate diet.

For those with triglycerides lower than 80, a metabolic-typing test developed and taught by Dr. Kristal, which involves some simple pH and blood-glucose testing in response to a glucose challenge can identify your type. The metabolic-type testing is unnecessary if your triglycerides or fasting glucose are high, since you already know that your body will do much better carbohydrate free. (These are the people with the “thrifty gene”.)

For those without these lab markers, the metabolic-typing test can easily identify one’s metabolic type for about another 60 percent of the population. This takes a lot of the guesswork out of dieting. Further, the testing can, long in advance, identify those headed toward the dreaded adult-onset diabetes (type 2). The paradox of the thrifty gene is that in times of scarcity, those blessed will survive much easier than will I, who must eat every day since my body does not store energy very easily. Yet in times of plenty, they are cursed if they do not recognize their gift and sharply reduce their intake of carbs because they will store fat everywhere including in the blood vessels. Their bodies prefer fat for optimal and efficient energy production.

If your lab does not disclose high triglycerides, you might be interested in getting tested. Dr. Kristal has trained many in his technique and a call to his office (800-772-0646) or visit to his website (http://meta-typing.com/bph/main.html) might help you locate a professional near you. There is also a home testing kit: it’s not nearly as reliable as the in-office testing, but very valuable nevertheless since it does provide very accurate blood glucose results that you will have in response to a sugar drink. It’s also a little pricey at $210, but well worth the cost. I strongly suggest you look at Dr. Kristal’s Web site (http://meta-typing.com/index.htm; old site: www.bloodph.com). Wolcott has developed his own method of determining metabolic type, and this information is available in his book. You can also find out more about Dr. Wolcott by checking out his website (www.healthexcel.com) or calling his office (650-325-1840).

To give you an example of how this works, Michelle, a 40-year-old female with cancer, tested herself using a home kit. Her blood glucose started low, peaked quickly and crashed, suggesting she was a fast oxidizer. I put her on a Group II diet (little carbs and heavy in meat), which is highly unusual for a cancer patient. Follow-up testing showed a significant correction of the blood-sugar curve and she felt much better.

Another one of my patients, Jim, a 62-year-old male, had battled his bulging waistline for years. “I’ve tried everything,” he told me. Yet when he came to see me, his triglycerides and cholesterol were high, indicating excess insulin and a need for drastic carb reduction. He fought me on my recommendation, but surrendered and within two weeks, was proud to announce an 11-pound weight loss to 200 (he is only 5’ 7”). His triglycerides and cholesterol likewise fell to the desirable range.

And then there’s me, the envy of many since I keep the perfect weight for my height so easily. I have always been drawn to a diet rich in veggies and felt sluggish after eating heavy protein. My triglycerides run about 30 and cholesterol is a low 155. Testing in Dr. Kristal’s office showed I’m markedly sympathetic dominant, hence my physical preference for the Group I diet and my ability to easily burn off carb calories. My body needs the minerals potassium and magnesium found in veggies to stimulate the parasympathetic side of my ANS to bring balance. Meat and fats will stress my parasympathetic side, which is already weak. This is the opposite of the thrifty gene, and those like me will do poorly in times of famine, but handle times of plenty much better.

We are living in a time of plenty. Unfortunately, for those who have thrifty bodies, the unbroken chain of storage leads to pathologic obesity and eventually to diabetes. The high levels of insulin in these individuals causes an undesirable medical condition now termed Syndrome X, excess insulin. High insulin is one of the greatest risk factors for the development of circulatory disease: it causes elevated blood pressure, deposition of fat all over the body, fluid retention, headaches, fatigue, abnormal cholesterol levels, and may directly age our DNA (genetic material). It’s likely one of the greatest aging factors. That explains why in countless lab test, the most reliable way to extend life in laboratory animals is simple calorie restriction. Low insulin slows the aging of DNA and maximizes lifespan. By burning fuel rather than calling on insulin to store it, exercise accomplishes the same as calorie and carb restriction, provided you do not compensate by ingesting more carbs.

One of the biggest problems I find is that people are eating out more than ever before and the portion sizes are huge (besides the fact that processed food is bad for you). The low-fat products you buy at a restaurant (or in the grocery store) may be low in fat, but they are not low-calorie. For instance, I recently saw that a regular 50-calorie fig cookie may have more fat, but its fat-free counterpart has 70 calories – which is what puts the weight on.

In order to lose the weight, you’ve got to eat a type that’s right for your metabolic type (not your blood type) and avoid the carbohydrates and calories (which means sugar and other foods high on the glycemic index).

Determining the best and worst foods for your particular metabolic type doesn’t have to be a guessing game. You’ll be amazed at the results.

The above is courtesy of:  Robert Jay Rowen, M.D., Golden Gate Health Association (GGHA), 2200 County Center Dr. Ste H, Santa Rosa, California 95472, 707-571-7560, Fax: 707-571-8929, http://www.doctorrowen.com/contact.html , or Email: drrowen@att.net

"Seeing patients keeps my skills as sharp as possible. I prefer to see the most difficult cases and those that conventional medicine has pronounced incurable. There’s nothing more rewarding than giving hope to someone who was told there’s no hope." -- Dr. Rowen

(Besides traveling out to see Dr. Rowen, he will also do telephone consultations with you or your doctor, and you can fax him your medical records). He is one of the best cancer doctors I know, and it's well worth getting his opinion. By the way, if you'd like to subscribe to his Second Opinions newsletter (from which this article came), go to: http://www.secondopinionnewsletter.com/

"Eating for one's individual metabolism is a time-tested truth. Common sense alone should tell us that the concept "one diet fits all" could not fly, anymore than one medical treatment could fit all. Celebrate your uniqueness, even if it is with foods shunned by conventional paradigms." - Robert J. Rowen, Second Opinion Newsletter
---

Curing Incurable Cancer! -- Dr. Rowen

When I first started seeing cancer patients 16 years ago, I repeated heard about a former dentist who had bucked the establishment (and paid dearly for it) by curing hundreds, if not thousands, of cancer patients. I was able to get a small paperback book that he authored, but as a novice to the concepts, most of it was “Greek” to me.

The Dentist was Dr. William Donald Kelley and his work has followed me everywhere, most recently staring me in the face with the new information on metabolic typing. Suddenly, it call came together – Atkins, Pritikin, the Zone diet, all were correct, but for their own particular metabolic type, not for everyone. However, Kelley had gone much further, much earlier, and truly deserves the Nobel Prize for his work!

In the 1960’s, Kelley awakened from a surgery to be told that he had pancreatic cancer. He said, “Just cut it out!” But when told that it was inoperable and he should prepare for his death within months, Kelley, always a deeply religious man, surrendered to God and began his road to recovery. (Also, his mother came over, went through his refrigerator and cupboards, and threw out all of his junk food, which I’m sure helped, too.)

Kelley was aware of the obscure and almost lost work of a great embryologist, Dr. John Beard, who connected pancreas activity to the control of cancer, so Kelley started taking loads of pancreatic enzymes.

As a student of the autonomic nervous system from college, and aware of acid-base chemistry in the body, he decided to alkalinize his body with a near vegetarian diet and he avoided acidifying animal protein.

He also used coffee enemas to cleanse his colon and stimulate liver/gallbladder flushing and detoxification. Remember, he was diagnosed in the ‘60s, and he wasn’t even 45. Kelley’s recovery from cancer led him to work with thousands more cancer victims spanning over a decade before other problems (with the medical establishment and government) led to an effective retirement in the ‘80s. I spoke with Dr. Kelley recently, more than 35 years after his diagnosis of an “incurable” cancer! The good news is that anyone with cancer can use his program to defeat this deadly disease.

There are three major parts to his program, all of which are natural and very simple: balancing the pH through diet and supplements; taking pancreas enzymes; and detoxifying the body. (There was also a spiritual/imagery side.)

Balancing pH – Francis Pottenger, MD pioneered the study of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Kelley, in his university days, was well familiar with the two branches of the ANS, parasympathetic and sympathetic. The former controls digestion, lowers heart rate, relaxes, restores, and alkalinizes the body. The sympathetic is the adrenaline side. It pumps up the body, accelerates heart rate and metabolism, enables the “fight or flight” response, and acidifies the body. Kelley found that the majority of us have a dominant branch. For example, carcinomas, “solid” tumors like prostate, breast, lung, colon, stomach, etc., arose and thrived in the acid environment of the sympathetic dominant. “Soft” tumors, like lymphomas, leukemia, myeloma, and cancers such as sarcoma and melanoma arise in more alkaline systems, or parasympathetic dominants.

Knowing what effects certain foods have on the body, Kelley designed diets to balance pH chemistry. For example, in a solid tumor, the sympathetic type, he would recommend a nearly vegetarian, meat-free diet, to alkalinize the body.

For the soft tumor parasympathetic types, he recommended a protein and fat-rich diet to acidify the body. Additionally, from Pottenger’s basic science discoveries of the action of nutrients on the two nervous systems, he formulated specific nutrient combinations to further help balance the ANS and pH.

Pancreatic Enzymes – These were the cornerstones of Kelley’s therapy. He used massive amounts around the clock, with less for parasympathetic types, since they already had a strong digestive system compared to the sympathetics (who lean toward constipation). Pancreatic enzymes, he though, dissolved the protective protein coating around the cancer cells as well as malignant proteins. (Dr. Blaylock believes that cancer secretes a kind of protein “glue” that agglutinates certain immune cells, and that the enzymes free the cells. Also, it seems that some of the enzymes, including nattokinase, dissolve a fibrin coating that the cancer cells use to “hide” from the immune system.)

Detoxification – While the pancreatic enzymes were eating away at the cancer and destroying it, the body would come under great stress from the toxins liberated from the dying tumors. Hence, it was absolutely mandatory to encompass good detoxification techniques. These included daily (or more) coffee enemas. Additionally, skin brushing, juice fasting, and liver/gallbladder flushes were regularly employed to enhance detox.

I first heard of Kelley in the 1980s, but by 1990, while still in Alaska, I was seeing patients seen by him more than a decade before and still totally free of the cancer they once had. But could the fabulous statistics I kept hearing be true? I found Dr. Kelley and, in a phone interview, he reaffirmed his experience of the 1970s, during which he saw late stage-4 cancers resolving into complete remission among many who rigorously followed his program. However, he added that cancer today is an entirely different animal, with the population being exposed to many more toxic chemicals, vaccines, nutrient-depleted “foods”, and stresses. Hence, we can expect inferior results in today’s world (which is why we need to integrate Dr. Blaylock’s teachings along with Dr. Kelley’s enzymes, metabolic typing, and faith or visualization/imagery today to increase effectiveness).

So, is Dr. Kelley’s therapy just pie in the sky hype? Hardly: a most trusted associate, Nick Gonzalez, MD, of Manhattan, was an apprentice of Kelley for six years (1981-1987), and even lived in Kelley’s house for part of that time. As a medical student at Cornell, he had heard about this enigmatic man and arranged a study project to assess the validity of what he had heard. Just the cases on pancreatic cancer alone were nothing short of fantastic. Of patients with confirmed pancreatic cancer, in whom a six-month survival, at best, would be expected, 11 completed the rigorous Kelley program. Five lived two years, four lived three years, and two went beyond four years.

Among the 10,000 cases of many cancer types Gonzalez reviewed, 500 had done extraordinarily well, in apparent remission. These were the ones who rigorously followed the entire program. Many more, who only partially followed the program, had comparable partial responses.

Gonzalez has been practicing and refining the Kelley methods for many years. He has compiled such an impressive anecdotal record of success that the National Cancer Institute recently awarded him a $1.5 million grant to study the method on pancreatic cancer, under the auspices of Columbia University. Amazingly, the NCI seems willing to look at the whole program, not just a single agent, as do almost all pharmaceutical industry sponsored medical studies. (You can contact Dr. Gonzalez at 212-213-3337 or www.dr-gonzalez.com)

I sat down with Dr. Gonzalez recently and was able to review his 20-year-old research thesis summarizing Kelley’s cases between 1974 and 1982. He confirmed the fabled stories far beyond my expectations. Furthermore, he allowed me to sit in with several of his ongoing cases. Take Cheryl Wilkens, for example. This brave 54-year old woman drove 20 hours to see Dr. Gonzales in 1992 after being given less than one year to live with a metastatic sarcoma. Her surgeons were eager to amputate her arm even with known lethal metastases to the liver and kidney. Ten disease-free years later, she was back to Dr. Gonzalez after severe stress from her workman’s compensation injury case apparently caused a recurrence (see Dr. Hamer’s theory of a very stressful event oftentimes preceding cancer elsewhere on this site).

Another patient I met was Tracy MacDonald, who was diagnosed in 1997 at age 28 with a high-grade six cm incurable glioma (brain cancer). The bulk of the tumor was surgically removed. In a September 2001 follow-up visit to Dr. Gonzalez, she had no recurrence and only a slight neurological deficit from the surgery itself.

I’m currently employing these methods, together with other strategies I’ve previously revealed in my articles (Note: see my “Cancer Info” and "Cancer Protocol" pages for articles on IPT, Artemisinin and Calcium d-Glucarate, as well as other articles by Dr. Rowen), and have no doubt as to the effectiveness of this inclusion in management. Diane Elhard of Alaska, having been through IPT and other intravenous therapies for her spine-metastasized breast cancer, has been off rigorous intravenous therapy for over a year now. First seen by me in May 2001 with intractable pain and neurological symptoms, she presently has no symptoms, lives a normal life, and her scans show the cancerous vertebral lesion is filling in with bone. Her long-term treatment is Kelly’s sympathetic diet, detox (including coffee enemas), pancreatic enzymes (for life), and small amounts of Artemisinin (see other articles by Dr. Rowen on “Cancer Info” page).

The work of Dr. Kelley and Dr. Gonzalez is truly revolutionary. The best news is that this therapy works just as well to prevent cancer as it does to cure it. Now, metabolic typing is not just a fantastic way to lose weight, it is also a life-saving way to eat. Here are the steps you must take to prevent cancer, lose weight, and live a long disease-free life:

(1)    You must understand your own metabolic type and eat according to it. Dr. Kelley has developed a detailed questionnaire and other literature and products that are available from College Health Stores (888-477-3618) for assistance in self-performed metabolic typing. Additional sources of assistance are the websites www.healthexcel.com and www.bloodph.com (http://meta-typing.com/bph/main.html)  These sites can give you help in locating a physician familiar with this knowledge.

(2)    Changing your eating habits to fit your metabolic type will help rejuvenate your pancreas, but you need to take plenty of pancreatic enzymes to prevent cancer. The best place to purchase them is from Nutricology (800-545-9960) [check prices at http://www.vitacost.com/NutriCology ]

(3)    As I said earlier, pancreatic enzymes can create a large amount of toxic waste products, especially as cancer is being destroyed, so it’s very important that you follow a stringent detoxification program. Organic coffee enemas are a good place to start (http://www.sawilsons.com/library.htm) and the regular use of Calcium d-Glucarate is important.

These three steps will go a long way toward helping you live a wonderfully healthy life, free from the ravages of cancer and many other diseases, including diabetes. If you already suffer from cancer, as always, I recommend you seek assistance from a physician who is familiar with these particular approaches.

Ref: Beard, John. The Enzyme Treatment of Cancer, 1911; Kelley, William Donald Kelley. Metabolic Answer to Cancer and Cancer: Curing the Incurable (http://www.amazon.com/Cancer-Incurable-Without-Chemotherapy-Radiation/dp/0970429002/) (http://www.drkelley.com/CANLIVER55.html  -- online book); Nicholas Gonzalez, personal communications. See also: http://www.amazon.com/Metabolic-Typing-Diet-Customize-Chemistry/dp/0767905644/

The Metabolic-Type Test (An Easy Method of Testing Yourself, from the book, “The Acid Alkaline Balance Diet”, pp15-16 by Kliment)

Kelley determined metabolic type by having his patients answer hundreds of questions in a bound book, but he also used a simpler test that works just as well:

Swallow 50mg of niacin (not niacinamide) on an empty stomach. If, within a half-hour, your skin turns red and you feel very, very hot and itchy, you have a meat-eating metabolism (Parasympathetic Dominant). If you feel warmer and have a better color in your face, then you have Balanced metabolism. If you don’t feel anything, then you have a grain-eating metabolism (Sympathetic Dominant). [This works because niacin produces alkaline effects, which worsens Parasympathetics, who are already too alkaline.]

A second way (or if you want to confirm the first test) is to take 8g of vitamin C (as ascorbic acid) a day for three days in a row. If you feel depressed, lethargic, exhausted and irritable, or if you are a woman and experience vaginal irritation, then you have a meat-eating metabolism (Parasympathetic Dominant). If you don’t notice any change at all, you have a Balanced metabolism. But if you feel an improvement – more energy, better quality of sleep – then you have a grain-eating metabolism (Sympathetic Dominant). [This works because ascorbic acid, even though it’s an acid, produces alkaline effects in the body, which worsens Parasympathetics, who are already too alkaline; calcium ascorbate is the preferred form of vitamin C for them.]

(Note: Ten years ago, I was almost killed by a one-size-fits-all low-fat diet and statin drugs given to me by my doctor until I realized that I needed lots of fat in my diet and gave the prescriptions to the Tidy Bowl Man, besides using metabolic typing, which fixed the extremely high triglycerides and bad cholesterol levels. I use specific supplements to prevent oxidation of my cholesterol. See my Cholesterol page for more information.

You might consider taking one of the following free tests as a starting point to determine if you're a Carb type, Protein type), or Balanced metabolic type as a starting point:

http://i.domaindlx.com/anilak/test.asp
http://glycolady.com/survey.htm

I have links to other self-tests about 2/3 of the way down on this page. Note that the Niacin  quick test that I mention below is dependent upon the individual having the proper amount of stomach acid in order to give correct results, and many seniors are lacking in stomach acid.  Taking Betaine Hydrochloride or 2 tsp of organic, unpasteurized apple cider in some water with a meal helps acidify the stomach but not necessarily the blood; it can increase absorption of vitamins and minerals and help you alkalinize. If you take too much Betaine HCL, it can acidify your blood (see my "MT&Stomach Acid" page for cautions and additional information). I use this to advantage, since I'm a protein type (Parasympathetic) and need to take certain additional foods and supplements because of my trouble with cancer, etc. and I don't want them to throw me out of balance even though I'm mostly following the protein type diet. Although the body struggles to maintain the blood pH at a constant 7.46, the urine pH is not constant and should not be; it normally cycles between about 7 (4am - maximum alkalinity) and 5 (4pm - maximum acidity) each day. I've found, by measuring my saliva and urine pH at 8am and 4pm, that by taking 1 Betaine HCL with breakfast, 1 with lunch and none with supper that my urine pH averages 6.0 (as it should) and my saliva pH averages 6.5. It's best to wait at least two hours after eating before measuring pH. Urine pH is measured mid-stream, and not from the toilet bowl (you don't want to test the pH of your public water supply). I use pH test paper with a range of 4.5 to 7.5, but there are test papers with wider range, such as 0-13, and pH test meters available, which are helpful if you are out of range of the 4.5-7.5. It is best to use foods and appropriate amounts (and forms -- see "carriers" below) of supplements to balance your metabolism, but if there are certain additional foods that are therapeutically necessary (such as extra lutein, ellagic acid, enzymes, cruciferous vegetables needed to fight cancer but not necessarily acidic or alkaline), you might take Betaine Hydrochloride with some or all meals, and/or Buffered Ammonium Chloride with and between meals to increase your acidity. Bicarbonates, such as Potassium Bicarbonate and Magnesium Bicarbonate, can be used to increase alkalinity. A little goes a long way. Be sure to wait for the normal lag time: it may take as little as 20-30 minutes before you begin to see a change. Monitor your urine pH closely, checking at first every half hour to get a sense of the dose you can tolerate. Start with the more subtle alkaline pancreatic enzymes, alkaline minerals, etc. (e.g., potassium citrate, magnesium citrate or carbonate) before resorting to the stronger bicarbonates.

Extra calcium is usually needed for protein types (I take 1500mg/day), while lower amounts of calcium (e.g., 500mg) along with extra magnesium and potassium is usually needed for carb types. Note that I still take Magesium and use potassium chloride (Morton Lite) salt, only less than a carb type, and I use the appropriate forms of them ("carriers"). The type or carrier (e.g., calcium lactate or chloride is good for an alkaline Parasympathetic or Slow Oxidizer type, calcium citrate or carbonate is good for an acidic Sympathetic or Fast Oxidizer type, and calcium gluconate or orotate are good for either acidic or alkaline types) is important. Note that you choose the carrier based upon whether you're an oxidative dominant (e.g., Fast Oxidizer) or an ANS dominant metabolic type (e.g., Parasympathetic dominant). I use the acidic forms of minerals because I'm a Parasympathetic type, which is too alkaline. Note that this means my blood is normally a little to the alkaline side of 7.46 (e.g., 7.48 or so), NOT that my urine is alkaline or acidic. Your metabolic type is reflective of your blood pH, and you try to balance that by following the diet for your particular metabolic type. Your urine pH is different, and is reflective of the reserves of acid and alkaline minerals that your body has to draw upon to balance your blood; if it is too far out of balance for too long, your body can run out of reserves and be much more likely to become weakened or sick.

You will notice that there is a "Comfort Range" of urine pH (and perhaps a particular type of day that usually corresponds to it) at which you feel best, since we are all individuals and there is some variation. Especially notice when you feel increased pain, fatigue or discomfort of any kind.

The first urination of the day consists of a normal elimination acid wastes of cellular debris and toxins. Urine pH can change from acid to alkaline in 15-30 minutes if there is a deeper alkalinity, so it's better to test it a short time after the first urination.

After you are in the right "ballpark", you can fine-tune your diet using the questionnaire at: http://www.mercola.com/forms/mtt_table.htm

One thing that you would want to remember is that, with the proper diet and supplements, some people change types and become more balanced, requiring an adjustment in their diet and supplements, so you would want to re-test periodically (every 6 months or so). Some people never change, but at least they will feel good and be in good health if they are eating right for their metabolic type.

There is too much contradiction and confusion out there. The most important thing for people to determine is if they're in Group I (fast oxidizers/parasympathetic dominant/overly alkaline), Group II (slow oxidizers/sympathetic dominant/overly acidic), or Group III (balanced); the subgroups (such as those mentioned on http://www.royalrife.com/hbal.html and used by Guy Schenker, Wolcott and Kristal) are less influential.

The more technically-inclined people can even determine some of these subgroups themselves (mentioned on http://www.royalrife.com/hbal.html) by taking their reclining and standing respiration, pulse and blood pressure, dermographic lines, gag reflex, noticing pupil size, and length of time they can hold their breath, even if they don't order some pH and urine specific gravity test paper off the internet. (Note: I don't recommend the one-size-fits-all "Zone Diet" that is mentioned on the hbal web page.) I find the acid/alkaline imbalances particularly helpful, and they are easy for the average person to perform: they show if the body is close to (or past) exhausting its reserves in dealing with excess acidity or alkalinity.

Regarding the commonly-heard claim that all cancer patients are too acidic, the following is from "Diabetes, Cancer and Weight: A Metabolic Typing Survey" by Harold J. Kristal, D.D.S. with James M. Haig, N.C (below, on this webpage or http://www.bloodph.com/articles/DiabetesCancerWeight.asp):
"My estimate of our cancer patients was almost completely accurate, with 78% falling into the Group I (carb type) category. What did surprise me was that more of these were Sympathetics (43%) than were Slow Oxidizers (35%). There is a widespread assumption in the alternative health community that cancer is associated with excess “acidity”, though rarely are the parameters of this supposed acidity defined. At the tissue level, cancer cells do indeed typically produce excess lactic acid, which might be expected to result in a compensatory alkalinity in the pH of the blood. The 35% of cancer cases in our survey who are Slow Oxidizers do indeed have alkaline blood, but the larger number of Sympathetics (43%) has acid blood. (Note that, for our purposes, we are using the terms acid and alkaline relative to the perceived ideal venous blood pH of 7.46; all blood is mildly alkaline in the absolute sense). Whether acid or alkaline, both of the Group I Metabolic Types require a diet lower in protein and fat and higher in complex carbohydrates. This diet helps to acidify the overly alkaline Slow Oxidizers, but alkalize the overly acidic Sympathetics (this is because, as we have already seen, foods affect members of the Oxidative and Autonomic systems in opposite ways). This dietary approach is generally in sync with the prevailing nutritional consensus for cancer patients."

Also note that certain metabolic types seem predisposed to certain kinds of cancer (search this page on "solid tumor" for more information).


Metabolic Eating by Harold J. Kristal, D.D.S. with Jessica A. Lewis (http://www.bloodph.com/articles/metabolic-eating.asp)

In recent Townsend Letter articles, I have outlined the benefits of eating a diet keyed to metabolic type. No one diet is ideal for everyone. What is healthful for one person may be inadequate or even harmful for another. When we recommend foods and supplements, it is crucial to address the patient's individual biochemistry. By testing thoroughly to determine each client's metabolic type, my associates and I are able to determine which foods and supplements will be beneficial for that person, and which will be useless or worse.

To properly explain the usefulness of metabolic typing, I must briefly discuss the crucial role of blood pH. The ideal venous pH is 7.461. At this level, the body most efficiently absorbs and utilizes nutrients. A higher or lower pH means the blood is too alkaline or too acid for optimal functioning. Mal absorption and poor utilization of nutrients can lead to an extremely broad array of symptoms, from fatigue and allergies to overweight and high blood pressure. The further the blood deviates from its ideal pH level, the more severe the symptoms become. When the blood moves to its ideal pH level, the body comes into balance and these symptoms generally abate or disappear altogether. The key to managing the blood pH lies in knowing the individual's metabolic type.

There are five basic metabolic types. Two of these tend to be too acid, and need foods that will help move their blood pH towards the alkaline. Two tend to be too alkaline, and need foods to make them more acid. One type tends to be fairly close to the center, yet may need fine-tuning to move to the ideal level. Why not simply determine the patient's blood pH and prescribe foods accordingly? Because even if we know, for example, that the blood is too acid, we still don't know which foods will make it more alkaline. The somewhat surprising reason for this is that any given food may be either alkalinizing or acidifying, depending on the metabolic type of the person ingesting it. Before we can be certain which foods (and supplements) a patient needs, we must know his or her metabolic type.

Recently, there has been a great deal of excitement about another way to eat for your type: eating for your blood type, as described in the work of Peter d'Adamo (see Additional Information at the end of the article:2) This system is very appealing, at least in part because it is so easy to use: once you know your blood type, you simply follow the diet for that type outlined in d'Adamo's book. According to d'Adamo's interesting theory, the various human blood types evolved over time, and each corresponds to a phase of human development, and therefore to the dietary patterns of that period. The first blood type to evolve was type O, which was the blood type of early nomadic humans, hunter-gatherers whose diet included as much meat as they could catch. Then, about fifteen thousand years ago, certain humans learned to grow crops. They settled, became agrarian, and shifted to a more vegetarian, grain-based diet. These peoples evolved blood type A. Further evolution and mingling produced the other two types, B and AB. According to the theory, people with blood type O will function best by eating a lot of meat, while blood type A's will be healthiest when eating a mainly vegetarian diet, and so on. This makes a great deal of sense. The trouble is, it doesn't work.

In my practice I see many type O's who thrive on a meat-based diet. But I also see many type O's who have become unwell on such a diet, and actually need a mainly vegetarian diet in order to feel their best. Conversely, I often see type A's who need to eat a lot of fat and meat to achieve optimal health. Other researchers and practitioners report the same experience: blood type is an unreliable indicator of dietary needs. Robert Crahon, a renowned nutritionist in Boulder, Colorado, has concluded that you cannot simply eat for your blood type. Bill Wolcott of Winthrop, Washington, who has created the Healthexcel program, states that you cannot rely on blood type to determine your most healthful diet and supplements. Dr. Guy Schenker, a chiropractor who runs the Nutrispect Company, is a renowned writer and publishes a monthly newsletter. He too is convinced that "eat for your blood type" is an erroneous prescription. The successes are balanced by too many failures. To be useful, the theory must produce consistent results.

Why does eating for blood type work for some and fail utterly for others? It is impossible to know for certain, but I conjecture that the type O of today is very different from the type O of sixty thousand years ago. At that time, presumably, all humans were type O, and all had evolved to utilize the hunter-gatherer diet. Then one population group split off, adapted to an agrarian diet, and developed type A blood. At this point, each population group was homogeneous, and blood type was probably a reliable indicator of dietary needs. Since that time, I would suggest, human population groups have mingled, creating a very mixed gene pool. Each individual still has one of the four major blood types, but may have characteristics of all four types, passed on with the genes of parents and grandparents. Therefore, the individual physiology may contain elements found in various blood types, in unique combination. One Type O could have a very different metabolism, and dietary profile, from another. Though it is pure conjecture, this is one theory that could help to explain the inconsistency of results from "eating for your blood type."

Eating for your metabolic type is not quite so easy to use - it requires a series of tests to determine type - but the consistent results make it worth the extra trouble. In order to efficiently determine each patient's metabolic type, Bill Wolcott and I have developed a series of tests which can be completed in one office visit. Before the visit, the client is asked to complete a questionnaire which includes both physical and psychological characteristics which are linked to metabolic type. In the office, we take physiological readings, including blood glucose level, pulse, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and several others. In addition, we ask for the patient's subjective experience of well being, energy level, hunger, etc. We then give the patient a high glucose drink. We do this in order to challenge the system, and measure its reactions. We repeat the physiological tests and the subjective questions at specific intervals over the course of the visit. The entire process takes about two hours, and the results, combined with our extensive research data, allow us to determine each patient's metabolic type, with 80% accuracy on the first visit. Further testing, including a protein challenge I have recently developed, helps us to classify the 20% of patients who yield ambiguous results from the standard series of tests (see Additional Information at the end of the article: 3).

In order to make the benefits of metabolic typing more widely available, my colleagues and I have developed a two part program for teaching medical and nutritional professionals how to use the system. In the Level One seminar, we outline the entire program, including hands-on practice at performing the tests and interpreting the results. This two-day seminar prepares the participants to begin using metabolic typing with their own patients. Consultation by telephone is available and generally necessary at this stage, until each participant becomes thoroughly proficient at using the system. To this end, we highly recommend that participants follow up by taking the Level Two seminar. In Level Two, we cover in depth the use of supplements as well as foods to resolve imbalances in the system. This information is fairly intricate, as well as extremely useful. In addition, we go through more complicated case studies, adding further details and refinements that cannot be covered in the basic program.

These seminars are given quite frequently. For more information, please contact my office:
Harold J. Kristal, DDS
655 Du Bois St, Suite F
San Rafael, CA. 94901

415-257-3099 Phone (800 number below is newer)
415-257-3519 Fax

General Information: pmn@meta-typing.com
Sales & Customer Support: sylvie@bloodph.com
800-772-0646

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
Watson, Dr. George. Nutrition and Your Mind New York: Harper and Row, 1972. Wiley, Dr. Rudolf. Biobalance. Tacoma, WA: Lifesciences Press, 1991.
D'Adamo, Peter J., Catherine Whitney. Eat Right 4 Your Blood Type: Staying Healthy, Living Longer, Achieving Your Ideal Weight New York, N.Y.: Putnam Publishing Group, 1997

The protein challenge, as well as the glucose challenge, will be described in greater detail in a future article.
http://www.minimum.com/b.asp?a=nutrition-solution
http://www.amazon.com/Nutrition-Solution-Guide-Your-Metabolic/dp/1556434375

http://www.afibbers.org/conference/session54.pdf:
"Biochemical Individuality"
While I use this term frequently, it is not one I coined. Rather, it is the title of a book by a biochemist, Dr. Roger Williams. We are all genetically and biochemically unique. That’s why some of us respond favorably (or unfavorably) to certain nutrients in foods, a special eating plan, or even nutritional supplements. There is another book, which I reviewed in the forum several years ago “The Metabolic Typing Diet” by William Wolcott and one worth time spent for anyone looking to find the correct eating plan for their biochemistry. Afibbers would be especially well-advised to read the book and determine their metabolic type based on the “dominance theory of individual metabolism.”

Robert Jay Rowen, MD, writes in his holistic newsletter, “Second Opinion,” (1) that people wishing to become healthy should eat right for your metabolism and not your blood type. He goes into detail about various diets used by his patients and observations that some diets worked for some and for others, they were a disaster. He references the same nutritional researchers as t William Wolcott in a historical review of the three researchers doing impeccable research but with three different theories and points out that while theories may be directly opposite, they still work when the ‘dominance theory of metabolism’ is applied.

I think this will be especially interesting to you since you are one of the adrenergic afibbers who doesn’t respond favorably to the typical nutritional suggestions offered here. (quoting and paraphrasing from this newsletter).

Dr. Rowen explains that there are two competing determinants of metabolism in the body: the autonomic (unconscious) nervous system (ANS) and the oxidative system. Foods and nutrients have opposing effects on body pH in each. Example – potassium and magnesium are alkalinizing –but they may not be in all individuals. The ANS has two branches, sympathetic and parasympathetic. The latter controls digestion, tends to unwind the system, and promotes alkalinization of the body when it is active. The sympathetic branch winds us up, gets adrenaline pumping and tends to acidify the body when active. From the Wolcott book, (page 382).

“Different nutrients and foods have varying effects on the different divisions of the autonomic nervous system. Some stimulate, strengthen, or support the sympathetic system, thereby producing an acidic shift in metabolism. For example, potassium is a powerful stimulant to the parasympathetic system, and magnesium has an inhibiting influence on the sympathetic system. Thus, these nutrients tend to increase the parasympathetic activity and decrease the sympathetic activity. On the other hand, phosphorous and calcium powerfully activate the sympathetic system, thereby increasing sympathetic qualities and decreasing parasympathetic qualities. Significantly, it should be noted that those foods and nutrients (in general) that product an acidic shift through sympathetic stimulation have the opposite pH effect on the oxidative system, producing an alkaline shift. And those foods and nutrients that have an alkaline influence through acceleration of the parasympathetic system will actually produce an acidic response via the oxidative system. I (Wolcott) observed this phenomenon in 1983 and named it “The Dominance Factor” This explains why what works for one person an fail or even worsen the same condition in another and exemplifies the necessity of first determining the metabolic type before making dietary or nutritional recommendations.

The two systems tend to balance out each other and Wolcott teaches that, “The net effect of pH depends on which system is dominant in the given individual.” Dr. Rowen observes that “ knowing your metabolic type is of paramount importance. If you are parasympathetic dominant and you are already alkaline, eating foods that stimulate further the parasympathetic system (vegetarian based) will only push you further into imbalance. [my comment: substitute the word “foods” for alkalizing minerals such as magnesium and potassium] If you are oxidative dominant and a ‘slow’ oxidizer, your alkalinity will be balanced by a vegetarian-based diet. It will provide the vitamins and minerals you need to speed up oxidation and generate more acids to balance out your system.

This is the secret of why one diet works for some but not for others. “One branch of the ANS is generally dominant. And within the oxidative system, fast or slow oxidation tends to dominate. Similarly ‘dominance exists on a larger systemic level between the ANS and the oxidative system. Whether you are ‘autonomic dominant’ or oxidative dominant’ will determine how a food or nutrient behaves in your body – whether it is alkalizing or acidifying. In order to select an appropriate diet and effectively balance a person’s body chemistry, it is essential to first determine which system is dominant.” (p. 43)

You need to read the book and determine your type – fast or slow oxidizer and autonomic or oxidative dominant. When I went back to locate this again, I decided it was time to read once again, this fascinating book. It’s hard to take it all in with just one reading. It’s a very important piece of research for everyone but especially so for afibbers. He has many comparison charts and a questionnaire so you can take determine your own type easily.

One chart of interest compares characteristics associated with sympathetic and parasympathetic dominance. [I am parasympathetic but some of the traits definitely don’t fit my profile – so this is just generalities, I presume.]

Sympathetic Dominance Physical Tendencies
•indigestion
•heartburn
•insomnia
•hypertension
•predisposed to infection
•low appetite
•angular facial structure
•tendency to be tall, thin
Psychological/Behavioral Tendencies
•excellent concentration
•highly motivated
•cool emotionally
•irritable
•hyperactive
•socially withdrawn

Parasympathetic Dominance
•Diarrhea
•Allergies
•Low blood sugar
•Irregular heartbeat
•Chronic fatigue
•Cold sores
•Excessive appetite
•Round face and skull
•Shorter, wider build
Psychological/Behavioral Tendencies
•Lethargy
•Procrastination
•Slow to anger
•Deliberate, cautious
•Warm emotionally
•Socially outgoing

Resources:
Roger J. Williams, “Biochemical Individuality” Keats Publishing 1998
Wolcott, William, “The Metabolic Typing Diet” Broadway Books 2002

(1) Second Opinion, January 2002, Second Opinion Publishing, Inc. Suite 100, 7100 Peachtree-Dunwoody Road,
Atlanta, GA 30328, 800-728-2288 (https://secure.secondopinionnewsletter.com/orderform.php)


Metabolic Typing

Taking plenty of enzymes, curcumin + quercetin (500mg of each mixed thoroughly in 1 TBS extra virgin olive oil taken 3 times a day), lots of sugarless pomegranate extract, and a very strict diet based upon metabolic typing (absolutely essential), which determines what foods are best for you as an individual, as well as addressing lifestyle and spritual aspects, including imagery are the at the core of a good treatment program. See my Cancer Protocol page (http://www.distance-healer.com/24.html) for information on metabolic typing. You can also call 888-477-3618 (College Health Stores) for Dr. Kelley's detailed metabolic typing questionnaire, and visit http://www.bloodph.com/

Keep in mind that some people incorrectly think that everyone is too acidic and needs to be more alkaline. I'm a parasympathetic dominant metabolic type and I need to be somewhat more acidic, with plenty of protein and lots of healthy fats or my triglycerides go way up and my LDL cholesterol converts to the most harmful type (small particle or "dense" LDL) and plugs up my arteries. I do best with about 30-40% of my calories from protein (white meat, organic, grass-fed free range chicken or turkey, and wild, line-caught fish -- mostly canned Alaskan salmon and sardines); 35-40% from healthy oils (4-6TBS cold-pressed EV olive oil, 4TBS purified fish oil, 3 capsules Borage, 2 capsules Evening Primrose, 1-2TBS EV coconut oil, some raw pumpkin seeds, flaxseed); and the rest from certain raw vegetables with the few carbs mentioned above).

Many people, even doctors, try to treat us with "one-size-fits-all" methods, including one size fits all people with the same blood type. 45% of the population is harmed by low-fat diets, and many are harmed by vegan diets (although some do well on them) -- the trick is knowing which one is best for you as an individual. Dr. Kelley cured himself of terminal cancer primarily by a vegan diet, but then went on to almost kill his wife with the same diet.

If you take a metabolic typing test, you can determine which foods are best for you and which will push you further into unbalance. You may have heard that everyone with cancer is too acidic and needs to alkalinize. This is not true! Remember: we are all individuals, and one's man's food is another's poison.

Parasympathetic dominant (and fast oxidizers) metabolic types are too alkaline and need to acidify to balance, while sympathetic dominant (and slow oxidizers) are too acidic and need to alkalinize. Knowing your metabolic type is a very important part in maintaining optimum health, whether you already have cancer or other diseases or just want to significantly reduce your chances of getting them.


Achieve Independent Health With Your (Free) Optimized Nutrition Plan: Getting Started
http://www.mercola.com/nutritionplan/index.htm
Fact: One person's food may be another person's poison. [syn: free MT self-test; free self-test;  Metabolic Typing; ]

http://www.mercola.com/nutritionplan/beginner.htm
There is a basic test you can take to find out your nutritional type, which is detailed in my book, Take Control of Your Health (http://products.mercola.com/take-control/). Alternatively, you can take the free online Nutritional Typing / Metabolic Typing test (http://products.mercola.com/nutritional-typing/) [syn: free MT self-test; free self-test;  Metabolic Typing; ]

(Note: See my Metabolic Typing pages on www.distance-healer.com about how each of us is an individual: some of us are too alkaline and others too acidic, and therefore can be protein, carb or mixed metabolic types and need different diets from each other. Since we're all unique individuals, no one diet is optimal for everyone (or even most everyone); also, Vegans and Vegetarians as a rule have more health problems and die sooner than if they had some eggs, cheese and/or fish. See my Metabolic Typing pages to determine your metabolic type and what diet is optimal for you. All MTs can benefit by having enough raw, organic, blenderized vegetables, though, but the proportions of nutrients vary amongst different MTs.)
---

For Alzheimer's: Niacinamide; 2 TBS/d Extra Virgin coconut oil; Folate; B6; B12; Bacopa; Ginkgo; plenty of organic cayenne/habenero, garlic, ginger, curcumin, quercetin, Milk Thistle extract (all oil-soluble, so mix in CP EV olive oil); Zeolite (see my Chemtrails page);

Free Report (without subscribing) How a Doctor Reversed Her Husband's Alzheimer's Disease in 37 Days (with inexpensive coconut oil! -- and a link to subscribe to Real Cures Newsletter):
http://www.realcuresletter.com/Offers/RC/RCHA12.htm
---

The surprising diet diabetics must avoid - increases your risk of dementia by 27%
Volume 7, Issue 20     May 15, 2014 [syn: Metabolic Typing; Alzheimer's Disease; ]
http://www.realcuresletter.com/Offers/RC/RCHA12.htm

Do you think diet doesn't matter when it comes to developing cognitive impairment? Think that the Mediterranean diet is great for everyone? Wait until you see the results of this new study just published in the journal Neurology. You just might be surprised.

Researchers at the Department of Neurology at the University of Athens in Greece were looking to find a connection between eating a Mediterranean diet and cognitive function. So they looked at a group of 17,478 men and women. This was not necessarily a healthy group. Some of them had diabetes. The only health criterion that the researchers demanded was that none of them had a history of stroke, and that all of them tested normal for cognitive function.

For the next four to five years, the researchers tested the participants every year for cognitive function and how close their diets were to the typical Mediterranean diet. They rated the diets on a 1-9 scale with 9 being an exact Mediterranean diet and 1 being a diet that was in no way close to a Mediterranean diet.

At the end of the follow up period, 1,248 (7%) of them tested out poorly enough to be diagnosed as having developed some degree of cognitive impairment. Then the researchers compared the likelihood of developing cognitive impairment to the diets the men and women were eating.

For those who did not have diabetes the risk of developing cognitive decline was reduced by 19% when their diet was closest to a Mediterranean diet. This was true regardless of other risk factors like where they lived, depressive symptoms, environmental factors, vascular risk factors, and their overall health status. But here's where it gets interesting.

The Mediterranean diet had a completely different effect on the men and women who had diabetes. The diet did not result in a decreased chance of getting cognitive impairment in this group. In fact, it did just the opposite. In diabetics, the diet increased the risk by 27%!

So let's get this straight. The same diet very significantly protected brain function in one group of people and very significantly made it worse in another group. This is why I find it so preposterous when people come out with some diet that is supposed to be great for everyone.

I don't care whether we are talking about a vegan diet, a vegetarian diet, a Paleo diet, a food combination diet, or whatever. Hippocrates wrote 450 years before Christ was born that, "One man's food is another man's poison." It is impossible to come up with a one-size-fits-all diet for everyone. The best diet is the one that works best for you. And you can best determine that by how you feel, Bio-Energy Testing, and your blood A1c and triglyceride levels. The healthiest diet will be the one that makes you feel great, causes your body to burn fat with a greater than 90% efficiency, keeps your A1c below 5.0%, and your triglycerides below 100.

Finding your Real Cures,
Frank Shallenberger, MD

REF:
Tsivgoulis G, Judd S, Letter AJ. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and risk of incident cognitive impairment. Neurology. 2013 Apr 30;80(18):1684-92.

Subscribe now to Dr. Shallenberger's Real Cures Newsletter and Get up to 19 Free Reports

Free Report (without subscribing) How a Doctor Reversed Her Husband's Alzheimer's Disease in 37 Days (with inexpensive coconut oil! -- and a link to subscribe to Real Cures Newsletter):
http://www.realcuresletter.com/Offers/RC/RCHA12.htm

Copyright © 2014 Soundview Publishing, LLC.

To contact us:
Your feedback is very important to us. So if you would like to contact us with a question or comment, please send us a message to feedback@RealCuresLetter.com.

Real Cures
PO Box 8051
Norcross, GA 30091-8051
800-791-3392
770-399-5617

If someone forwarded you this email, and you'd like to receive your own Real Cures Alert, please sign up on our website: www.RealCuresLetter.com
---

Is this the easiest and surest way to avoid dementia?  [syn: Alzheimer's Disease; ]
Volume 7, Issue 2 | January 9, 2014

Sometimes it's the simple, natural things that make the biggest difference. In fact, new evidence suggests that one of the most effective ways to reduce your risk of dementia by as much as 40% is really quite simple.
The authors of a brand new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine looked at 1,835 men and women with an average age of 76. None of them had any signs of dementia. They tracked the group for an average of 6.8 years. During that time a whopping 28% of them developed dementia.

I think that's scary! But why so high?

The researchers ruled out the effects of all of the other usual risk factors for dementia including: age, sex, educational level, level of exercise, presence of coronary and cerebrovascular disease, atrial fibrillation, smoking, and high blood pressure. They were looking at only one factor – blood sugar.

The best way to determine your overall blood sugar levels is with a test called the glycohemoglobin test, or more simply A1c. A1c is a test that tells you what your blood sugar levels were on average over a three-month period. The higher your A1c level is the higher your overall blood sugars were over that time. So the researchers looked at the levels of the A1c and how they affected the risk for getting dementia. Here's what they found.
After looking at literally thousands of A1c levels in these people, they found that those men and women who had an A1c of 4.9% or less were 14% less likely to develop dementia. Those who had an A1c of 5.0% were at no risk for dementia from their blood sugar levels. Those who had an A1c equal to 5.2% had a 10% increased risk. Those with an A1c of 5.4% had a 15% increased risk. And those with an A1c of 5.6% had an 18% increased risk. The risk continued to climb the higher the A1c went. And get this. Those with an A1c of 8.2% had an incredible 40% greater chance of becoming senile. But don't go away yet. There are two other things from this study I want to point out.

One is that this effect of blood sugar was independent of all of the other risk factors I mentioned above. This was risk caused pure and simply from fairly modest elevations in blood sugar. The second thing is that an A1c less than 5.9% is reported as normal on the lab sheet. So if your A1c is "normal" at 5.6% you still have an 18% greater risk of becoming senile from it. Like I said before, that's scary! Even small fluctuations in blood sugar can wreck your brain.

Your levels of A1c are going to depend on many factors including the amount of carbohydrates in your diet, your exercise level, your hormone levels, and your genetics. But clearly the most important factors are diet and exercise. I just checked my A1c. It was 5.0%. That puts me at a slightly reduced risk. I was happy about that result, but I wasn't all that surprised. I have good genetics, eat very few carbohydrates, and exercise for an hour six days a week. But there are going to be some people that do all of that and still can't get that A1c down low enough. So what to do then?

If that's you, try taking my Super Immune QuickStart-DM. You can get this by calling the toll free clinic order desk at 866-376-0610 or by going to the products page on the clinic website www.antiagingmedicine.com. This is the standard QuickStart recipe with additional herbs and nutrients to help maintain healthier blood sugars. In addition, take 500 mg of berberine extract. And then retest in three months.

Finding your Real Cures,
Frank Shallenberger, MD
---

You don't have to suffer from dementia - ever! [syn: Alzheimer's Disease]
Volume 6, Issue 49 | December 12, 2013     

We're still three weeks away from the New Year, but here's a new year's resolution you should do right now. Do it before you forget. That's because it has to do with your brain function.

The 2013 World Alzheimer Report entitled "Journey of Caring: An analysis of long-term care for dementia" just became available. The Alzheimer's Disease International group published the report. And the news is not good. According to their statistics, by the middle of the century, the number of people suffering from dementia will nearly triple to a staggering 270 million people at a cost of $600 billion. That's 270 million people who can't take care of even their basic needs, and often don't even know where they are. The purpose of the report was to alarm the governments of the world to prepare. But I'm taking a different look at it.

Dementia is not inevitable. In the great majority of cases, it is completely preventable. So instead of governments focusing on how to pay for the incredible costs of dementia, why not just prevent it? And that certainly is one of the main focuses I have for you. I don't want any of you or your families coming down with dementia. That is why I have written so much about it. So here is a quick checklist of what each of us should be doing to prevent dementia.

First, avoid drugs unless you absolutely need them. The worst drugs for causing dementia are the antidepressants, tranquilizers, and the statin drugs. But that doesn't exhaust the complete list. Many older people have unusual brain reactions to common drugs. So for a complete list, go to www.worstpills.org. Also, ask your pharmacist if any of the medications you are on have mental impairment as a side effect. This is yet one more reason to work with a doctor who knows about how to treat problems without drugs. While many drugs are needed, you can replace most of them with natural therapies.

Second, replace your hormones as your body becomes deficient in them. Of all the ways to prevent dementia, the single most effective is hormone replacement. I'm talking about thyroid hormones, melatonin, sex hormones, and adrenal hormones. Most men and women over the age of 50 need some if not all of these hormones. This is not something you can do yourself. Also, it's nothing that blood tests can diagnose. Most of the time, people that need hormones have blood levels in the so-called "normal range." Your doctor has to diagnose and treat it. So make sure your doctor is well-trained in hormone replacement according to a detailed history and examination. I describe this in my book Bursting With Energy.

Third, and almost as important as hormone replacement, is exercise. And I don't mean just walking a few miles every day. The only way that exercise can really protect you from diseases as you get older is when it is intensive and consistent. If I were in charge of everything, I would see to it that everyone over the age of 50 had a personal trainer they met with for one hour two to three times a week as long as they were above ground.

Fourth, is diet. The single most critical thing about diet is making sure that you avoid the high glycemic carbs. You know the ones I'm talking about: flour products such as bread, crackers, pretzels, chips, etc; sweets; fruit juice, and dried fruit. Fruit in general is okay, but keep it to no more than one piece of fruit per day. Once again, I discuss this in detail in my book Bursting With Energy. Coffee (two cups per day) and alcohol (two drinks per day) have been shown to decrease the chance of dementia. But amounts greater than these have the opposite effect. [Note: alcohol should not be taken in any amount with liver problems or cancer.]

Lastly, make sure you get di-sodium EDTA chelation. Everyone should have a chelation treatment once a week for 20 weeks starting on their 60th birthday. After these 20 treatments, you should continue to have one a month for the rest of your life. Chelation removes toxic heavy metals, improves circulation, and prevents strokes and heart attacks.

I suppose it would be theoretically possible for someone who was doing all these things to still come down with dementia. But I would have to say that it would be extremely unlikely. Oh, and yes, taking these precautions will also reduce your risk for just about every other chronic disease there is as well. So if you are already doing all these things then congratulations. You are not only making the quality of your life much better, you are also doing your part to reduce the national debt. If you need some help in any of these areas, please make it your resolution this year to get it together before you forget!

Finding your Real Cures,
Frank Shallenberger, MD

REF:
http://www.alz.co.uk/research/WorldAlzheimerReport2013ExecutiveSummary.pdf.
---

Shattering Nutritional MYTHs With Metabolic Typing
(from http://www.metabolictyping.info/docs/_myths1.html or
http://www.naturalhealthyellowpages.com/health_books/wolcotts_essay.html)

MYTH : Everyone should take calcium (or vitamin C, or anti-oxidants, etc.).
REALITY : Nothing could be further from the truth. Through Metabolic Typing, we know that any nutrient can have opposite effects in different Metabolic Types. This is why a nutrient can help correct a condition in one person, have little or no effect on another person, or worsen the same condition in a different Metabolic Type.

Thus the old adage, "one’s food is another’s poison." This is why you should only take those supplements that are right for your Metabolic Type. Every nutrient raises or lowers up to 9 other nutrients in your body. So taking therapeutic doses of vitamin C can actually, for example, cause cancer (vitamin C lowers copper, so if you are already deficient in copper and take high therapeutic doses of vitamin C, you can seriously compromise your immune system).

Taking too much calcium can actually cause osteoporosis (in order for calcium to be utilized, it needs certain synergistic nutrients and if you are already low in those synergistic nutrients, taking more calcium will only further deplete the existing deficient levels, worsening any problems relating to calcium metabolism).

Eating a low-fat diet can actually raise cholesterol (if it further disturbs the body's cholesterol metabolism, e.g., certain metabolic types paradoxically need to eat a high-fat diet to promote efficient cholesterol metabolism). Of course, everyone needs all the nutrients in order to be healthy . . . but not in therapeutic doses. So before you start supplementing your diet, it’s best to know your Metabolic Type.

MYTH : Nutrients are nutrients. It doesn't matter what form they are in.

REALITY : The carriers of nutrients are just as powerful -- in some cases even more powerful -- in their effects on metabolism as the nutrients themselves. Depending on your Metabolic Type, any nutrient can be acidifying or alkalinizing.

For example, in a Parasympathetic (alkaline) Metabolic Type, calcium is acidifying, but in a Fast Oxidizer, calcium is alkalinizing. So, it is important that an acid form of calcium (e.g., calcium chloride) be used if you’re an alkaline Parasympathetic type metabolizer, but that an alkaline form of calcium (calcium citrate) be used if you’re an acidic Fast Oxidizer.

Otherwise, the nutritional supplement will at best have a neutral effect, and at worst, actually worsen your existing imbalances. You can take the best supplements money can buy, but if they are not right for your Metabolic Type -- the right nutrients and the right forms of the nutrients – they won’t produce the result you’re looking for and can end up making you worse than before.


Metabolic Typing: Calcium Is Not For Everyone
http://www.healthexcel.com/docs/_calcium1.html

There is a great deal of misinformation and misunderstanding surrounding the use of calcium supplementation. For example, it is generally accepted that women over the age of 40 should be taking calcium supplementation to prevent osteoporosis. Here is yet another nutritional myth that has been shattered by metabolic typing research. Through metabolic typing we have come to understand that there is no one diet right for everyone and that there are no “good foods” or “bad foods” except those relative to each person's biochemical individuality. Similarly, although everyone needs to obtain all available nutrients in his daily diet, taking therapeutic doses of a nutrient such as calcium, for example, is another matter altogether.

While supplementing the diet with calcium can help some problems in certain metabolic types, in other metabolic types it can actually worsen the same problems. The reason for this is that any problem related to calcium has to do with its utilization or metabolism in the body. When there is a disruption to calcium metabolism or a loss of calcium metabolism efficiency, it often involves a calcium deficiency. But, there are two kinds of calcium deficiency: an actual quantitative deficiency and a relative deficiency of utilization due to biounavailability.

In order for calcium to be utilized, two factors are necessary: 1) calcium, and 2) calcium's synergistic nutrients (calcium requires other specific nutrients in order to be utilized). Certain metabolic types naturally require higher amounts of calcium in their diet in order to function optimally, tending to have sufficient synergistic nutrients but lack sufficient calcium. But other metabolic types have the opposite biochemical balance: these metabolic types tend to already have high calcium but are low in the synergistic nutrients, thereby doing well on diets lower in calcium and higher in the synergistic nutrients.

Thus, only the metabolic types (parasympathetics, fast oxidizers or anabolic dominants) that are actually deficient in calcium benefit from calcium supplementation. But the other metabolic types (sympathetics, slow oxidizers or catabolic dominants) who already have enough or excess calcium in the body but lack the synergistic nutrients will worsen their condition by calcium supplementation by creating an even greater biounavailability through further depleting synergistic nutrient stores.

Furthermore, the form of calcium used, when it should be used, is equally important. Parasympathetics, alkaline metabolic types that require calcium, should only use acid forms of calcium like calcium chloride or calcium aspartate. If other alkaline forms are used, not only will the problem not resolve but it could also even get worse than before. On the other hand, Fast Oxidizers, acid metabolic types, require an alkaline form of calcium and would actually worsen using the acid forms mentioned above.


Minerals: Individualized Biochemical Considerations
http://www.healthexcel.com/docs/_insom1.html

The kinds of foods that one should eat are a matter of nutritional individuality and can only be recommended after proper analysis of one's metabolic type (Contact Healthexcel for information about determining your own metabolic type).

Food provides fuel for the body. Like the fuel for a car, if the fuel is not correct for the engine, the energy produced will be poor compared to what it can and should be. The result can be disrupted sleep patterns at best, and may prove to be a major causative factor in full-blown insomnia. Since people do have different requirements for nutrition, what may help one person to alleviate insomnia may cause it in another. Nonetheless, the following are the major areas of concern in all metabolic types:

EATING BEFORE BED To eat or not to eat, that is the question....or at least part of the question. The other part concerns what to eat!

In certain metabolic types (parasympathetics or fast oxidizers) there is usually a requirement to eat before going to bed. If these types don't eat, they usually will experience difficulty falling asleep, and if they do fall asleep they will invariably awaken in the middle of the night. Usually, their ideal fuel mixture is a snack that contains a good amount of protein and fat. A high carbohydrate snack may help some, but is usually not sufficient to carry them through the night. In these metabolic types, a high carbohydrate snack will actually be stimulating (by increasing the oxidation rate) and thus, prevent sleep.

Other metabolic types (sympathetics and slow oxidizers) generally don't do well eating before bed. They often complain that when they eat before going to bed, food feels like a rock in their stomachs. If they do eat a bedtime snack, they do best eating food high in carbohydrate with just a little protein and fat, like a small bowl of cereal with milk or some fruit and yogurt.

SALT Parasympathetics and slow oxidizers tend to do better including high sodium foods and some salt in their diets to help balance body chemistry. But, in the sympathetics and fast oxidizers, salt often has too strong of a stimulating effect on the adrenals and if eaten around bedtime may contribute to insomnia.

CALCIUM In the autonomic dominant, calcium usually acts as a stimulant by innervating the sympathetic system. Thus, in the sympathetic dominant, calcium supplementation before bed is not recommended. However, in the extreme parasympathetic dominant who has problems awakening in the night with hunger pains, calcium may help diminish the appetite by restoring autonomic balance. In this type, calcium supplementation before bed may help prevent the body chemistry from going too parasympathetic during the night.

In the oxidative dominant, calcium tends to have a sedating, calming effect by slowing down the rate of oxidation. When the oxidation rate gets too fast, carbohydrate is "burned" too quickly. The result is that one also runs out of fuel too quickly as well. When this occurs at night, insomnia may result. Calcium supplementation before bed for the fast oxidizer may help prevent this from occurring. (CAL-COM)

MAGNESIUM In the autonomic dominant, magnesium acts as a natural tranquilizer by inhibiting the influence of the sympathetic system. In the sympathetic insomniac characterized by racing thoughts or an inability to shut the mind off when trying to sleep, magnesium has been found to be an excellent bedtime supplement. (MAGNESIUM-COM)

POTASSIUM Whereas calcium is the mineral which acts as the major stimulator of the sympathetic system, potassium is considered the major innervator of the parasympathetic system. In the sympathetic dominant, magnesium and potassium work well together in producing a calming, sedating influence.

On the other hand, in the fast oxidizer, potassium tends to have a stimulating effect. The result may be a strongly increased appetite. (POTASSIUM-COM)

THYMUS Whereas the sympathetic system is responsible for energy, motivation, get-up-and-go, the parasympathetic system controls immune function, digestion and all repairing/rebuilding activity. Thus, it is the parasympathetic system which normally dominates during sleep. Certain glands are related to the sympathetic system while others are more related to the parasympathetic system. The thymus is considered to be the major "parasympathetisizing" gland of the endocrine system. Stimulation and support of the thymus has been observed to increase parasympathetic tone, particularly when employed along with magnesium and potassium. (THYMOTRATE)

Other parasympathetic glandulars, singularly or in formulas, may be used along with thymus for a stronger parasympathetisizing influence. (SYNERGY-COM #1, IMMUNO-COM).

TRYPTOPHANE This amino acid when taken before bed is known to encourage sleep, particularly when combined with some carbohydrate. It appears to be most effective for parasympathetics, but has not been found to be of much help in other metabolic types with insomnia. (TRYPTOTRATE)

ADRENAL In rare instances, insomnia may be related to adrenal insufficiency. This type of insomnia is characterized by being able to fall asleep, but "jerking" awake 20-30 minutes later. It may be accompanied by feelings of panic and/or a racing heart rate. Some adrenal support along with other nutritional support of the sympathetic system may be very helpful. Often a bedtime snack including meat or poultry is also of benefit. When adrenal insufficiency is the case, an herbal blend of capsicum, Siberian ginseng root, and gotu kola--normally an energy-improving combination--may prove very helpful. (ADRENOTRATE)

HERBS Herbs used in tea or capsules may be very helpful in helping to support and balance body chemistry. Herbs are almost always better when taken in combination as opposed to individually. They are available from most health food stores prepackaged blends.

Valerian root, wild lettuce, blue vervain, catnip, blue violet, passion flower, and scullcap are likely best for sympathetics. Comfrey root, horsetail (shavegrass), oat straw, lobelia, chamomile and dandelion may be more suited for parasympathetics.

http://www.healthexcel.com/docs/_herb1.html
If the nature and the constitution of an herb runs contrary to the nature of the human metabolism on whom it is employed, it will have an aggravating influence on the constitution that will override the symptom specific nature of the herb, contributing to existing imbalances or creating new ones, even to the point of worsening the very symptom for which it was employed. For example, Valerian, Hops and Skullcap are commonly employed in formulas for insomnia, but it is a frequent complaint that they "don't work." It so happens that 2 of these herbs actually have a stimulatory influence on certain qualities in certain types. Used in these types, the calming aspects of the herb are offset by their metabolically stimulatory action, effectively neutralizing their desired result.


Using vitamin C as an example, ascorbic acid will acidify oxidative metabolic types and alkalize autonomic types, while calcium ascorbate (buffered vitamin c) does the opposite. Group I requires the ascorbic acid form because it acidfies the slow oxidizer, but alkalizes the sympathetic. Group II requires the calcium ascorbate form because it alkalizes the fast oxidizer and acidifies the parasympathetic. Among foods, brocolli is a Group I food and cauliflower is a Group II food. Again, see the book for details. (Source)


Ascorbic Acid or Calcium Ascorbate
http://www.bloodph.com/articles/vit-c.asp

Calcium ascorbate and ascorbic acid are both forms of vitamin C. Calcium ascorbate, being alkaline forming in the blood, will alkalize the blood; where ascorbic acid, being acid forming in the blood, will acidify the blood.

It is absolutely necessary that the venous blood ph be maintained in the very close proximity pH of 7.46. Anything below this would be acid; anything above this would be alkaline. Why is it necessary to have your pH be around 7.46? This is the ideal pH which optimal absorption and utilization of enzymes and trace nutrients takes place. If your pH is too far off one way or another, you will not be able to properly metabolize these precious nutrients.

A practical example that happens is when I do nutritional reinforcement for cancer patients. Generally cancer patients venous blood is alkaline. I find most of these patients are taking the ascorbate form of vitamin C, which is further alkalizing their blood. This means they are not able to utilize many of their enzymes or trace nutrients. Certain vitamins and minerals are either acid or alkaline forming in the blood. The scope of this report is to just focus on vitamin C. When the conversion is made to further acidify their blood, higher energy is usually observed. This is true for mostly everyone.

Most people are confused about the pH systems of our body. When the urine pH is acid, the blood is generally alkaline and vice versa. Taking a pH reading of your urine after a fifteen-hour fast will give some indication of the acid alkalinity of your blood. Type A personalities, lean people, and compulsive behavior are individuals with alkaline blood. If your nature is to gain weight easily, hard to wake up in the morning, and be less disciplined, you are probably an acid blood type. Acid blood people have to snack in between meals. These are all generalities. The best way of determining your blood type is by biochemical testing which is done by a number of us.

In conclusion, you should now have a good idea which Vitamin C is right for certain individuals. You should now understand why the pH is so critical for optimal health. It might even be possible now for you to figure out which Vitamin C is right for you.
---

http://www.dreddyclinic.com/vitamins/Calcium.htm
You never get calcium into the body elementally, it is always attached to something else. It is the something else, which can cause a shift in the underlying pH of urine and saliva and if shifted the wrong way can lead to imbalance. The calcium's that are neutral would be calcium gluconate and orotate (a good bone builder). These are calcium's for use by anybody at any time.

Calcium lactate on the other hand can push a person too acid. But it is ok to use if a person has a high average alkaline urine and saliva pH (7.0 or above) and you want to push it down.

Calcium citrate, hydroxide, and carbonate (Tums) can push a person too alkaline. But it is ok to use if a person has low average acid urine and saliva pH (5.8 or below) and you are working to push it up. In all cases you should return to a neutral calcium when the proper pH zone is reached. Continued use of the wrong calcium in the wrong pH can lead to unbalanced conditions and potential problems. Note that Coral Calcium is full of lead and heavy metals and is overpriced, besides being dangerous.
---

CARRIERS or Types:

A good reference as to which carriers are acidic and which are alkaline is Biological Ionization by Dr. Alexander F. Beddoe.

Acidic carriers: phosphate, sulfate, lactate, chloride, aspartate.

Alkaline carriers: carbonate, oxide, citrate, hydroxide, bicarbonate, hydrate (e.g., lime water).

Neutral carriers: gluconate, orotate. (Can be used with all pH's)

The mineral or vitamin needed is based upon the Metabolic Type (e.g., Parasympathetics and Fast Oxidizers need Calcium), but the carrier is based upon whether the person needs to be more acidic or alkaline (e.g., Parasympathetics and Slow Oxidizers are too alkaline and need to take the acidic forms, such as Chlorides or Aspartates). 

Note: the Metabolic Typing premise that all Parasympathetics and Fast Oxidizers need Calcium but don't need Magnesium, and vice versa for Sympathetics and Slow Oxidizers is a one-size-fits-all theory, which is a bit too rigid for good health. Some people need extra Magnesium (and other vitamins and minerals) for therapeutic reasons; in this case, it's more important to use a carrier that is better absorbed than one that fits a certain metabolic type. For example, Dr. Russell Blaylock recommends the Malate form of Magnesium for various illnesses and diseases (see his books, newsletters and NewsMax columns); oxide and carbonate forms are poorly absorbed and neutralize a lot of stomach acid, thereby causing problems absorbing nutrients and properly digesting foods, vitamins, minerals, etc. Note that stomach acid is neutralized in the duodenum by the pancreas (sodium bicarbonate) and does not affect overall blood pH negatively.

Malic acid is the same type of carrier as ascorbic acid (buffered vitamin C or magnesium ascorbate, which is a good form of magnesium and vitamin C with an alkaline carrier)  and citric acid (magnesium citrate). I don't use extra calcium because I don't want to have calcium deposits in my arteries and soft tissue calcification (I get it all from two 10 ounce blenderized glasses of raw, org specific vegs per day, plus the 200mg that is in my Activite Sport multi), so I'm not sure who sells calcium malate. Note that many other vitamins and minerals are required in order to absorb calcium and ensure that it ends up in the bones and teeth and not in the soft tissues, including vitamins K2, D3, Sr, Zn, Bo, Mg, etc. You can obtain these in a balanced form by getting your calcium from specific organic, raw, blenderized vegetables.
---

Excerpts explaining that not only which mineral or vitamin is taken is important, but also which form of carrier:

For example, we know that potassium stimulates the parasympathetic side of the Autonomic Nervous System, thereby producing an alkaline shift in an “autonomic dominant” person, and we know that potassium also increases Fast Oxidation, thereby producing an acidic shift in an “oxidative dominant” person. So taking potassium is good for you if you are an acid-type Sympathetic Autonomic Dominant, or an alkaline-type Slow Oxidative Dominant, but bad for you if you are an already alkaline Parasympathetic Autonomic Dominant or an already acid Fast Oxidative Dominant! But which form of potassium is good for you is also an issue specific to your Metabolic Type.

A supplement containing potassium citrate, for example, has a completely different effect than one containing potassium chloride. Potassium citrate essentially produces an alkaline effect, but potassium chloride has an acid effect.

To illustrate this highly significant issue, potassium is needed by Sympathetics (who are acid) and Slow Oxidizers (who are alkaline). But whereas potassium citrate is great for a Sympathetic, it’s bad for a Slow Oxidizer. The reverse is true for potassium chloride -- it’s great for a Slow Oxidizer, but disastrous for a Sympathetic.

The reality is that you can neutralize or even adversely override the benefit of a nutritional supplement if you take it in a form that is wrong for your Metabolic Type. Make no mistake: Just like foods, the wrong nutritional supplements can create health problems instead of correct them. Unless you are taking supplements that are right for your metabolic type, it would be better to not take any at all!
--

REALITY : The carriers of nutrients are just as powerful -- in some cases even more powerful -- in their effects on metabolism as the nutrients themselves. Depending on your Metabolic Type, any nutrient can be acidifying or alkalinizing.

For example, in a Parasympathetic (alkaline) Metabolic Type, calcium is acidifying, but in a Fast Oxidizer, calcium is alkalinizing. So, it is important that an acid form of calcium (e.g., calcium chloride) be used if you’re an alkaline Parasympathetic type metabolizer, but that an alkaline form of calcium (calcium citrate) be used if you’re an acidic Fast Oxidizer.

Otherwise, the nutritional supplement will at best have a neutral effect, and at worst, actually worsen your existing imbalances. You can take the best supplements money can buy, but if they are not right for your Metabolic Type -- the right nutrients and the right forms of the nutrients – they won’t produce the result you’re looking for and can end up making you worse than before.
--

Furthermore, the form of calcium used, when it should be used, is equally important. Parasympathetics, alkaline metabolic types that require calcium, should only use acid forms of calcium like calcium chloride or calcium aspartate. If other alkaline forms are used, not only will the problem not resolve but it could also even get worse than before. On the other hand, Fast Oxidizers, acid metabolic types, require an alkaline form of calcium and would actually worsen using the acid forms mentioned above.
--

If restricting the more alkaline foods does not correct excess alkalinity, you can use ammonium chloride to acidify urine pH. Ammonium chloride can be taken with or between meals as needed to offset an alkaline urine pH. If you have a history of a sensitive stomach always test any new acid supplement first at low doses and take with food instead of between meals.

Excess acidity will also inhibit the immune system by blocking key metabolic pathways. If your urine pH is consistently below pH 5, review the supplements that you are currently taking and reduce or eliminate acidic supplements. A buffered form of Vitamin C in capsules or powder will help offset excess acidity. (If you are too acidic) Avoid Vitamin C formulas that are "buffered" with ascorbates as they are still quite acidic. The buffering agent must be a mineral form of bicarbonate to have the alkaline effect you need. Most forms of calcium and magnesium are alkaline and can be used as well to offset excess acidity (see "carriers" on this page for which are alkaline). (The Metabolic Balancing Workbook contains a list of alkaline foods and supplements.)
---

In biochemistry textbooks, calcium is considered an alkalizing mineral, and is known to be one of the primary buffering agents used by the body to keep the blood pH stable. However, Metabolic Typing is based on the observation that how people metabolize food and nutrients is determined by which of two dominance systems (the Oxidative, or energy generating, and the Autonomic, or energy regulating) controls their metabolism. From this perspective, calcium is only alkalizing to the two Oxidative types (Fast and Slow Oxidizers), but is acidifying to the two Autonomic types (Sympathetics and Parasympathetics). While dietary calcium and all other nutrients are required by everybody, supplemental calcium is only desirable for one member of each dominance system: Fast Oxidizers, in whom it helps to alkalize their overly acidic blood; and Parasympathetics, in whom it helps to acidify their overly alkaline blood. (Remember that, calcium, like all nutrients, will work oppositely in members of the two dominance systems).

Conversely, supplemental calcium would tend to further alkalize the already overly alkaline Slow Oxidizer, while further acidifying the overly acidic Sympathetic. Thus, too much supplemental calcium given to the wrong Metabolic Types can actually create or exacerbate a blood pH imbalance. Because the body draws on the minerals stored in bone tissue to buffer blood pH, this will often result in a net loss of bone tissue.
---

The two most common forms of supplemental vitamin C are ascorbic acid and calcium (or other mineral) ascorbates.

Ascorbic acid, being acid forming, will acidify the blood of both of the oxidative dominant types (fast oxidizers and slow oxidizers). Fast oxidizers already tend to have an overly acid venous blood pH, and so ascorbic acid, which would make them even more acidic, would not be an appropriate form of vitamin C for them to take. Conversely, slow oxidizers tend towards an overly alkaline blood pH, and so ascorbic acid, by making them more acidic, would tend to balance them out.

Calcium ascorbate (and other mineral acorbates), being alkaline forming, will alkalize the blood of the oxidative dominant types. This would be a desirable effect for fast oxidizers (with their overly acid blood pH), but undesirable for slow oxidizers (with their overly alkaline blood pH) who would be pushed even further in the alkaline direction. Therefore calcium ascorbate would help balance out fast oxidizers but would exacerbate the alkaline imbalance of slow oxidizers.

One practical example of this would be cancer patients who, by and large, tend to have alkaline blood pH. Giving such individuals calcium ascorbate (which is alkaline forming) would push them further into an alkaline imbalance, whereas ascorbic acid (which is acid forming) would help move them towards a more metabolically balanced condition.

For autonomic dominant types these values are reversed, so that (for complex biochemical reasons) nutrients that acidify that oxidative dominant types, alkalize autonomic dominant types, and, conversely, nutrients that alkalize oxidative types acidify autonomic types.

Ascorbic acid, therefore, has an alkalizing (rather than acidifying) effect on both of the autonomic dominant types (sympathetic and parasympathetic). This would be beneficial for sympathetic types, who tend to have an overly acid blood pH. However, it would not be beneficial for parasympathetics (who have an overly alkaline blood pH) who would be further alkalized by it, and pushed even more out of balance.

Calcium ascorbate, however, has an acidifying effect on both of the autonomic dominant types. This would create further imbalance in the sympathetic types (whose blood pH is already too acid). However, it would help balance parasympathetics, who need acid forming nutrients to balance their overly alkaline blood pH.

Thus, using vitamin C as an example, we can see how important it is to determine the individual's metabolic type. Such knowledge allows us to select the appropriate form of this vital nutrient, as well as all nutrients and foods, so that we can learn to intelligently and effectively balance out our metabolic type, thereby achieving a new level of health and harmony.
---

http://www.drlam.com/opinion/osteoporosis.cfm
Osteoporosis Prevention Protocol
Metabolic Typing and Calcium

Metabolically, most people can be divided into three types. Protein, carbohydrates (carbs), and mixed (a combination of carbs and protein). Certain metabolic types naturally require a higher amount of calcium in their diet in order to function at their best. They tend to have sufficient synergistic nutrients but lack sufficient amounts of calcium. Other metabolic types are the opposite. These types tend to already have high levels of calcium in their body and are low in synergistic nutrients. They do well in diets that are relatively low in calcium and high in other synergistic nutrients. By simply overloading one’s body with mega doses of calcium may make things worse.

Generally speaking, protein types are fast oxidizers and are autonomically parasympathetically driven. These people require large amounts of calcium to normalize their acid-base balance. On the other end of the spectrum, those who are in the carb groups are slow oxidizers and are sympathetically driven (they respond in a different way). Therefore when the carb types receive calcium, their pH and acid-base balance gets considerably worse. This may be one reason that helps to explain the observation that calcium does not seem to be associated with reducing bone fractures in all people.

1. Diet
A. Meat

There is little doubt that there is a strong correlation between dietary habits and osteoporosis. As far back as 1968, research has shown that the amount of minerals in the bones varies with the diet. An excessively high protein diet (particularly animal protein) leads to a negative calcium balance. In other words, there is a net loss of calcium from the body resulting in reduced calcium storage in bones. This is a serious risk for osteoporosis.

When excessive amounts of meat, refined carbohydrates, and fat are consumed into our diet over a long period of time, our body becomes more acidic. The body is not used to this and prefers to be in an alkaline environment most of the time. As a compensatory mechanism, the body directs calcium and other minerals to be removed from the bones and transported to the rest of the body in an attempt to buffer and neutralize this acidic environment. Some of this calcium goes into the kidney and is excreted out. As a result, there is a net loss of calcium from the body.

In addition to the loss of calcium from the bones, animal proteins, due to the high sulfur content, alter the kidney's re-absorption of calcium, so that more calcium is excreted. Those on high protein diets such as meat and dairy products can lose about 100 mg of calcium a day. In one study, individuals who consumed excessive amounts of protein were found to have a negative calcium balance of 137mg/day. This translates into approximately 50g/year and a potential skeletal mass loss of 4% per year.

Milk Promotes Calcium Loss

A major concern of those who have been advised to stop drinking milk is, "What will happen to my teeth and bones?" The answer is astoundingly simple, "They will improve."

The majority of the world's population takes in less than half the recommended daily calcium intake of 800 mg a day and yet they have strong bones and healthy teeth. The notion that continuous ingestion of high amount of calcium is needed in order to maintain strong bones and prevent osteoporosis must be dispelled. Studies have repeatedly shown that strong bone is due more to a function of optimum amount of magnesium and a low acidic environment in the body rather than calcium from a nutrient perspective.

While milk provides calcium, it is ironic that milk also promotes calcium loss in the body. This is because the consumption of the excessive proteins found in cow's milk increases the need for minerals found in the body to neutralize the acid formed from digesting the animal protein in cow’s milk. Such minerals include calcium and magnesium and 99 percent of the body's calcium and 60 percent of the body's magnesium is stored in the bone. As mentioned before, calcium is removed from the bone to the blood in order to neutralize the acid, resulting in the loss of calcium from the bone. In fact, calcium excretion and bone loss increase in proportion to the amount of animal protein consumed.

In short, milk and diary products are acid forming substances. Acidic byproducts that accumulate in the body is also one of the primary reasons of accelerated aging and cancer. It is best that our body be bathed in a slightly alkaline environment. A diet high in milk, meat, and poultry means that, more protein is ingested, and the more acidic the body becomes. Vegetarians, for example, need about half as much calcium as meat eaters as they lose much less calcium from their bones.

Cow's milk also contains phosphorous. When calcium and phosphorus reach the intestine at the same time, they compete for absorption. The more phosphorus there is, the less calcium will enter the body. Some phosphate compounds form insoluble calcium salts in the intestine. In addition, excess phosphorus triggers the release of parathyroid hormone, which sucks calcium out of the bones. When combined with calcium, phosphorus also competes with and prevents calcium absorption in the intestine.

The higher phosphorous level found in animal food (as compared to plant food) may also interfere with calcium absorption. Phosphorous is an important component in a balanced nutritional program, but it may bind with calcium and therefore reduce the amount of calcium that is absorbed by the body. Plant based foods have protein, but contains a lower calcium –phosphorous ratio.

Not all calcium in food enters the body. Many components of food such as phosphates, vitamin D, fiber, proteins, and hormones alter the absorption of calcium in our diet. For example, Cow's milk contains 1,200 milligram of calcium per quart; human milk contains only 300 milligrams. But the total calcium absorbed in breast-fed babies is higher than in babies fed cow's milk. This is because the phosphates and palmitic acid in cow's milk reduce the absorption of calcium by the body.

The optimum calcium/phosphorus ratio is important for bone building. The ideal ratio is 2.5 to 1. Too much phosphorus consumed will upset the balance, and will lead to progressive bone loss in the body. The ratio in cow's milk is only 1.3 to 1.

In addition, milk consumption is not helpful in improving bone density for those over 30 years old, because the milk has been pasteurized. The pasteurization process causes a severe destruction of essential nutrients.

Low-carb diet

As more Americans turn to the low-carb, high protein diet to lose weight quickly, some research studies are reporting that such diet can increase the risk of kidney stones as well as the risk of osteoporosis. In a six week study reported in the American Journal of Kidney Disease in 2002, ten healthy adults consumed a regular diet for two weeks, followed by a low-carb, high protein diet for two weeks, and finally followed by a moderately restricted carbohydrate diet for four weeks. It was found that while the volunteers lost nine pounds on average, most developed ketones. These ketones raise the acid level in the blood, and some volunteers had their acid level increased by 90%. There is also an increase of calcium being lost in the urine by the volunteers. Protein is a source of acid and produces an acidic environment in the body. The body simply does not like this. When exposed to a high acidic environment, the body tries to buffer or neutralize the acid by withdrawing minerals such as calcium from the bones. As such, the body’s calcium stored in the bones is therefore reduced.

Vegetables

The kind of vegetables that is good for osteoporosis prevention include leafy vegetables, legumes, raw nuts ( that have been pre-soaked overnight in water), and seeds. All these contain plentiful amounts of calcium. It has been shown that the average African women only consumes only 500mg of calcium a day, and mostly from plant sources. However, they have a positive calcium balance because they retain their calcium much better.

The key is to control the protein level and thus maintain an environment that is not overly acidic in the body. When protein intake is reduced to a modest level, and especially if the protein can be derived from plant sources, excessive calcium intake to compensate for the calcium lost is not necessary. The level of calcium intake can further be reduced if it is combined with magnesium and strontium, both facilitators of calcium transport.

Soy

Soy is high in phytoestrogen, a plant estrogen precursor. The effect of soy in the body is still controversial, but many experts believe that soy blocks excessive estrogen from being absorbed and acts like estrogen when it is deficient, thus providing the best of both worlds.

Interesting studies have been conducted, including one from Italy involving 90 women age 53-65. It was found that ipriflavone and calcium supplementation was able to increase bone mineral density by 2% after 6 months and 5.8% after 12 months with the added bonus of significant decrease in pain-45% in 6 months, and 62% at 12 months. However, it should be noted that soy does have a dark side. Excessive amounts of unfermented soy intake such as tofu can lead to thyroid disturbances. Women who are in post-menopausal period should therefore be careful when using soy as a supplementation for osteoporosis. Fermented soy products such as miso or tempeh do not have this problem and can be taken liberally.

Fluids

Avoid stimulatory drinks that contains caffeine which acidifies the body and cause calcium to be withdrawn from the bone. Avoid coffee and tea.  Distilled water should also be avoided. Decaffeinated coffee and decaffeinated tea is acceptable in moderate amounts. Herbal tea is acceptable.

2. Exercise and osteoporosis

Weight bearing exercises is as close as one can get when one is searching for a magic bullet in the prevention of osteoporosis. The positive effect of exercise on bone density is greatest in adults who have been sedimentary and just started exercising. Studies have shown that even elderly adults over age 80 who have done active exercise and weight bearing programs can significantly increase their bone density over a shot period of time. Weight bearing exercises such as walking, running, jogging, dancing, are especially important. While swimming is a great exercise for cardiovascular diseases, it is not as good for bone health when compared to walking and jogging.

Bone is a live tissue and it responds to stress placed upon it. In a positive way when a person becomes sedimentary, the normal stress placed on the bones is removed. The bone will lose its density and become brittle over time. It comes as no surprise that a patient with spinal cord injuries will have significant loss of bone density if proactive steps are not taken. The opposite is also true; athletes have stronger bones than the average adult.

Exercise is a life long activity. Its effect on bone mass will decrease when one stops to exercise. Therefore, exercise needs to be done on an ongoing basis. 30 minutes of weight bearing exercise daily will improve bone density, heart health, muscle strength, coordination, and balance. The good news is that studies have now shown that the 30 minutes of exercise can be broken down into ten-minute blocks without sacrificing results.

Remember to warm up and cool down always. It is also wise to combine several different kinds of weight bearing exercises. Incorporate exercises that build strength, and increase resistance in weight to the program. Lastly, drink plenty of water to prevent dehydration.

3. Nutritional Supplement Considerations

Fifty years ago, nutritional supplementation for bone building involves primarily around the single element calcium. Later, it was found that magnesium and vitamin D are important components as well. The latest nutritional research now points to three other important team players – strontium, vitamin K, and collagen.

Bone building is no longer about any one single nutrient. The best program consists of a cocktail with all six nutrients working concurrently.

A. Calcium

Calcium is a basic building block of bones. The average adult has about 3 lbs of it in their bones, teeth, and blood. The use of calcium supplementation to treat post menopause osteoporosis has increased significantly since 1987, which is the year the National Institute of Health increased the recommended daily intake of calcium to 1500mg for the prevention of primary post-menopausal osteoporosis (PPMO). There is significant controversy surrounding this recommendation because working it was made despite the conflicting conclusions research by some clinical studies presented to the NIH. Some of the studies show no significant effect of calcium intake on mineral density on the trabecular bone and only a slight effect on the cortical bone. Since PPMO is predominantly a condition due to the demineralization of the trabecular bone, there is no justification for calcium mega dosing for postmenopausal women. In fact, soft tissue calcification can be a serious risk factor arising from calcium mega dosing under certain conditions. Most research and trials using calcium in the prevention of post-menopausal osteoporosis also involve the use of vitamin D and this makes it difficult to attribute the benefit to calcium alone.

It is also interesting to note that the bone density increase found in the first two years of calcium supplementation may not substantially increase over a long period of time. In contrast to most clinical data, a great number of studies did not find a significant association between calcium intake and a reduced risk of bone loss fracture. It is well known that calcium at low or moderate doses is largely dependant on the action of vitamin D for active support. Sufficient amount of Vitamin D are important for the prevention of post-menopausal bone loss. Insufficient vitamin D leads to less calcium absorption, elevated blood concentration of parathyroid hormone, as well as an increased rate of bone absorption. All these can eventually lead to a bone fracture if not corrected in time.

The conventional wisdom and recommendation taken for granted is that a high dose of calcium is necessary for the prevention of post menopausal osteoporosis, as well as for the building of strong bones for children and elderly. Long term studies however have not been able to confirm that calcium alone can get the job done without the help of other nutrients especially in the case of PPMO.

RDA

Current Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) is 1000 mg of calcium for younger adults, and 1200 mg for people over the age of 50.These numbers reflect the total calcium needed for a diet that is high in protein and fat (typical of the young American diet). Such diet also produces a body that is acidic and as a result, calcium is drawn out of the bones to neutralize this acidic environment in order to return the body to a more alkalized state. A high calcium intake of more than 1000 mg or more is suggested for anyone who falls into this demographic group that takes in a diet high in protein.

This recommendation  of 1000 to 1500 mg calcium is not suitable in the case of postmenopausal osteoportic women whose diet is likely to be high in green leafy vegetables. In this type of diet, the amount of calcium required in terms of supplementation is much reduced. If you have a high calcium intake from food source, then less supplemental calcium will be needed.  As well, a diet high in green leafy vegetables leads to an alkaline internal environment. The body will not have a need to withdraw calcium from the bone required. As a result, only 500 mg is required if accompanied by the right dose of magnesium.

Mega-dosing of calcium in excess of 1000 mg per day has little correlation with increase in bone density. In fact, taking too much calcium can inhibit the absorption and utilization of other important bone nutrients, such as zinc and copper. In fact, mega-dosing of calcium can be detrimental to your health, leading to the extra cellular deposit of calcium and eventual formation of bone spurs. Excess calcium also can serve as a cardiac irritant and can lead to cardiac arrhythmias.

Multiple studies have shown that calcium supplements - such as calcium gluconate, calcium citrate, calcium carbonate, and even calcium citrate-malate - slow, but do not halt or reverse, menopausal bone loss, whether taken alone or with vitamin D. Even a total daily calcium intake of 3000 milligrams of calcium alone isn't enough to stop bone loss. The bone will not be able to take in more calcium than it is capable of if other supporting nutrients are not present. An osteoporosis program focusing largely on calcium intake is a recipe for failure.

Metabolic Typing and Calcium

Metabolically, most people can be divided into three types. Protein, carbohydrates (carbs), and mixed (a combination of carbs and protein). Certain metabolic types naturally require a higher amount of calcium in their diet in order to function at their best. They tend to have sufficient synergistic nutrients but lack sufficient amounts of calcium. Other metabolic types are the opposite. These types tend to already have high levels of calcium in their body and are low in synergistic nutrients. They do well in diets that are relatively low in calcium and high in other synergistic nutrients. By simply overloading one’s body with mega doses of calcium may make things worse.

Generally speaking, protein types are fast oxidizers and are autonomically parasympathetically driven. These people require large amounts of calcium to normalize their acid-base balance. On the other end of the spectrum, those who are in the carb groups are slow oxidizers and are sympathetically driven (they respond in a different way). Therefore when the carb types receive calcium, their pH and acid-base balance gets considerably worse. This may be one reason that helps to explain the observation that calcium does not seem to be associated with reducing bone fractures in all people.

Calcium can be found in vegetables and milk. Traditionally, milk is consumed, but it is not helpful in improving bone density as it is pasteurized. Raw milk on the other hand, is very different and beneficial, but not everybody has access to this however.

You can get an ample supply of calcium from green leafy vegetables. Supplementation with calcium is an easy and inexpensive way to assure that you get enough. About 500 mg of calcium a day is all that is needed for strong bones, provided that you also take 500 mg of Magnesium and follow a diet ample in green leafy vegetables. The ratio of magnesium to calcium should be one to one (1:1) or even two to one (2:1) for strong bones, according to many researchers who are in the forefront of anti-aging medicine. Over 80% of adults in America do not consume even the 300 mg of magnesium recommended. While there is no harm in excessive amount of magnesium being consumed, some people do develop a harmless diarrhea.

How Much to Take?

A recent study made by the National Institute of Health supports the notion that, starting at childhood, an adequate amount of bone reserve needs to be built up in order to have it for the future. As such, a high dose of calcium intake of 800mg for children from years 3-8 and 1300mg for those between 9-17 is suggested.

From age 18 onwards, the use of high dose calcium above 1500 mg is only indicated if the diet is high in meat (leading to an acidic body). Only 500 mg is required if the diet is high in vegetables (leading to a alkaline body), and excessive calcium intake can in fact cause more harm than good. The blanket recommendation of high doses of calcium (over 1000mg )after adulthood regardless of diet or metabolic type, should be abandoned.

Nutritional Consideration : 500 mg of calcium in a diet high in green leafy vegetables. The calcium intake should be increased up to 1500 mg a day if the diet is high in meat and protein.

B. Magnesium

Magnesium acts as a balancer of calcium in our body, much like progesterone balances the effect of estrogen, and omega-3 balances omega-6 fatty acids.

Magnesium balances the body's calcium supply and keeping it from being excreted. Without magnesium and other trace minerals, calcium ingested, especially if excessive, will be deposited not in the bone but perhaps in the wall of our arteries.

It is interesting to note that human autopsy studies have shown a close correlation between osteoporosis and abdominal aortic calcification. Since magnesium deficiency can promote osteoporosis and calcium deposit in aorta, logic dictates that magnesium is likely to be the primary factor and that calcium is secondary when it comes to the prevention of bone loss.

Magnesium regulates the active calcium transport. It has been shown that magnesium has fracture prevention effect, and is able to increase bone density when taken on an ongoing basis. Magnesium deficiency has been shown to be a significant risk factor for post-menopausal osteoporosis, and this may due to the fact that magnesium deficiency alters calcium metabolism and the hormones that regulate calcium.

Magnesium has been shown to prevent the formation of calcium oxalate crystals, the most common cause of kidney stones. Studies have shown that 500 mg a day of magnesium is able to reduce the recurrence rate of kidney stones by as much as 90%. Magnesium is also nature's "calcium channel blocker", preventing the entry of excessive calcium into the cell resulting in contractions, chest pain, hypertension, and arrhythmias. Magnesium deficiency can cause various abnormalities of calcium metabolism, resulting in the formation of calcium deposits in arteries. Osteoporotic women who were deficient in magnesium had abnormal calcium crystals in their bones, whereas osteoporotic women with normal magnesium status had normal calcium crystals in their bones.

One researcher, Dr. Guy Abraham, postulated that a dietary program emphasizing magnesium as well as calcium for the management of PPMO would be more effective in preventing bone loss. His concern for low magnesium for osteoporosis is similar to his concern for women with premenstrual tension syndrome. To test Dr. Abraham’s hypothesis, 19 post-menopausal women on hormone replacement therapy were given a supplement consisting of 500mg of calcium (50% of RDA), and 600mg of magnesium (200% of RDA). Studies were conducted every 3 months. Subjects receiving the treatment showed an 11% increase in bone density versus 0.7% in the untreated group. Results also showed that in post-menopausal women on hormone replacement therapy, the magnesium emphasized program was able to produce calcaneous bone density 16 times greater than that of the dietary advice alone. At the start of the study, 15 subjects were below the fracture threshold. After a year of treatment with magnesium supplementation, in conjunction with calcium supplementation, only 7 of them were below the fracture threshold.

Researchers such as Dr. Abraham postulate that PPMO is predominantly a skeletal manifestation of chronic magnesium deficiency facilitated by estrogen withdrawal during the post-menopausal period. He suggests raising the RDA of magnesium to 1000mg a day and lowering the RDA of calcium to 500mg a day. This suggestion is more in line with the World Health Organization” (practical allowance)”.

Nutritional  Consideration: 500mg magnesium.


http://livingbalance.us/readings/Week_5.pdf
Not All Supplements Are Equal

One of the stunning revelations of our system of Metabolic Typing is that any given nutrient can have opposite biochemical effects in different Metabolic Types.

The reason for this is that every nutrient stimulates or inhibits one or more of the body’s Fundamental Homeostatic Control Systems. Different Metabolic Types are dominated by different FHC’s which dictate how nutrients behave in one person’s metabolism as opposed to someone else’s metabolism. And, of course, this is why it’s critical for people to obtain the quantities and balances of nutrients that are right for their Metabolic Types.

This alone distinguishes Metabolic Typing Nutrients from every other kind of nutritional formulation available today. But one of the great secrets of nutrition that has only been revealed by Metabolic Typing research is the surprising fact that the carrier attached to the nutrient(s) also has specific and potent effects on the FHCs -- sometimes even more so than the nutrient itself!

For example, we know that potassium stimulates the parasympathetic side of the Autonomic Nervous System, thereby producing an alkaline shift in an “autonomic dominant” person, and we know that potassium also increases Fast Oxidation, thereby producing an acidic shift in an “oxidative dominant” person. So taking potassium is good for you if you are an acid-type Sympathetic Autonomic Dominant, or an alkaline-type Slow Oxidative Dominant, but bad for you if you are an already alkaline Parasympathetic Autonomic Dominant or an already acid Fast Oxidative Dominant! But which form of potassium is good for you is also an issue specific to your Metabolic Type.

A supplement containing potassium citrate, for example, has a completely different effect than one containing potassium chloride. Potassium citrate essentially produces an alkaline effect, but potassium chloride has an acid effect.

To illustrate this highly significant issue, potassium is needed by Sympathetics (who are acid) and Slow Oxidizers (who are alkaline). But whereas potassium citrate is great for a Sympathetic, it’s bad for a Slow Oxidizer. The reverse is true for potassium chloride -- it’s great for a Slow Oxidizer, but disastrous for a Sympathetic.

The reality is that you can neutralize or even adversely override the benefit of a nutritional supplement if you take it in a form that is wrong for your Metabolic Type. Make no mistake: Just like foods, the wrong nutritional supplements can create health problems instead of correct them. Unless you are taking supplements that are right for your metabolic type, it would be better to not take any at all!


Measuring your pH
www.thewolfeclinic.com

As mentioned above, it is the cancer cell pH that must be raised to 8.0 or above. The human blood cannot be raised to a level of 8.0, because you would die before that happened. Your body does an amazing number of things to keep your blood pH at a fairly constant level. Unfortunately, when a person has a highly acidic diet, some of these things lead to major health problems. That is how desperate the body is to maintain a constant overall pH.
So how do you know when your cancer cells have a pH of 8.0 or above? You can’t. Some people talk about measuring the pH of the blood, lymph, saliva or urine to try to determine whether the pH of the cancer cells is high enough. It won’t work.

At present no tests can accurately gauge how acid you are because current diagnostic methods reveal only that acid wastes are present in body fluids (blood, lymph, urine, mucous, and saliva). Such tests never give a reliable indicator of how much acid waste is actually in the system, because the fluids are always running through the tissues attempting to remove these excess tissue acid wastes. Therefore, although it is possible to measure body fluid as being alkaline or acid, it is impossible to evaluate the state of body tissues (skin, organs, glands, muscles, ligaments, arteries and vessels) based solely on blood, urine, or saliva tests.

Unfortunately, waste acids that are not eliminated when they should be are reabsorbed from the colon into the liver and put back into general circulation. They then deposit in the tissues. It is these tissue residues that determine sickness or health!

The only real way to tell if your tissue is acidic or alkaline is to analyze your diet.
In short, the best way to insure your pH obtains a level of 8.0 or above is to follow the protocol in this article and make sure you don’t partake of too many acidic foods or drinks (such as soda pop), meaning follow the “cancer diet.” As well, you should read Dr. Wolfe’s books “Reclaim Your Inner Terrain” (http://www.thewolfeclinic.com/pdf/Reclaim_Dec_2006.pdf) and “Spoiled Rotten” (http://www.thewolfeclinic.com/pdf/Spoiled_Rotten_Dec_07_2006.pdf) for more information.

Balancing Your pH (the below is courtesy of Jan Johnson, author of the Metabolic Typing Workbook)

Welcome to RandomRat!

The random rat is the name given to a subject in a laboratory study whose unexpected responses differ distinctly from those of the other more predictable test subjects.

As with the random rat, our stressful times produce puzzling new health problems. We need innovative solutions that focus on the total health of unique individuals that take into consideration key disrupting influences that accompany our current lifestyles.

At Random Rat we explore ways to address your individual health needs - to recognize and manage influences on your health and to determine which choices support, not interfere with your health.

Hello, I’m Jan Johnson.

Over the last twenty or so years I have dedicated much of my time to understanding the devastating process that drags a person down into illness and the often illusive and precarious path that leads back towards health. When my own illness motivated this quest, I was convinced that scientific research held all the answers, but only if they could be unearthed and pieced together into a bigger, more comprehensive and workable picture.

My experience in the early 80’s with Multiple Chemical Sensitivities gave me a unique perspective on health. The illness I developed was a result of chemical exposures I experienced from 20 years as an artist. This sustained toxic exposure slowly broke down my immune system, and ultimately the rest of my body.

As this illness kept me within the shell of “barely alive” for several years, I experienced all too deeply the limitations of both traditional and alternative medical care. My body became a minefield, hyper-reacting to every change. Much to everyone’s frustration, most attempts at treatment only made me worse. My immune system had literally turned on itself and my ability to eliminate toxins had failed, turning relatively benign toxins even more toxic. I did not respond favorably to the usual treatments because my illness had progressed too far. Abnormal circumstances; high levels of toxic chemical exposures coupled with poor nutrition and other factors, unique to my constitution, rendered my immune system defenseless and nearly irreparable.

I clearly needed to find a way of changing my situation while protecting against further aggravation of my weakened condition. I thought of it as the Humpty Dumpty Syndrome – when the body’s systems become so utterly run down – great care was needed to avoid putting Humpty back together incorrectly again.

Purely by accident I discovered the merit of observing daily changes in urine pH. I found that my frequent setbacks were usually accompanied by an excessively acid or alkaline change in my urine pH. These extreme swings coincided with some form of added stress. Finally I had found something I could see and measure that was directly related to the changes in my health. Now I had what I needed - an early warning system. Through trial and error, I learned to avoid certain foods and supplements and whatever else that, for whatever reasons, were creating additional stress - stress that I could now avoid. As I grew more familiar with the cause and affect relationship between how I felt and the numerous influencing factors, I became more sophisticated in my control. I was able to develop a tool kit of acid and alkaline effects to counterbalance and ultimately stabilize my hyper-reactive condition.

My understanding of pH was the beginning of many new answers. It opened the door to previously unrecognized areas of weakness and hidden stressors. One by one, I strengthened weakened systems and replaced missing nutrients – maintaining a constant eye to stabilizing my pH in everything I did. I could now proceed without the fear of major, or worse yet, mysterious setbacks. My experiences over the years taught me that so much of what we do affects our pH and in turn our pH affects most everything we do – and how we feel. I learned to view health in terms of pH effects, a perspective that has proven to be quite useful. PH balance is not the definitive solution to all health problems rather, it is a perspective that proves time and time again to be an invaluable tool in directing effective choices while avoiding unrecognized stressors..

Understanding Your Acid-Alkaline Balance – Adapting to Stress.
Maintaining habits that support a normal acid-alkaline balance increases your ability to cope with life’s many stressors. There is a multitude of supportive choices that you can make every day to promote a normal acid-alkaline balance and avoid overtaxing your important natural adaptive ability. The body’s ability to adapt is one of its most resilient features. This is evident when we see those who continue to function effectively in spite of a tremendous amount of stress and strain in their lives. This resiliency unfortunately, has its limitations. We can, however enhance this innate resiliency by understanding the role that nutrition and key activities play in promoting the body’s protective acid-alkaline balance.

Nutrition – A Integral Part of Balance

The field of nutrition is becoming increasingly exciting as guesswork and generalizations are being replaced by a growing number of accurate testing and analytical methods based on sound scientific research. There is truly a window opening into the inner worlds of the body’s miraculous wisdom. The picture only gets brighter as we incorporate these new insights and breakthroughs into our own daily nutrition and lifestyle habits.

Bringing it all together.

My intention for randomrat.com is to place new and insightful information where it can be viewed, discussed and integrated into workable solutions. Our health is clearly our own responsibility and is only as good as we make it. Even the most astute health care provider cannot do our job – that, we must do for ourselves. Only we have the real inside story - the daily experience of our own unique nature and changing needs.

The tools provided by the Metabolic Balancing Workbook are intended to increase your awareness of your options for a broader understanding of how to balance your nutrition and related lifestyle factors to strengthen your body’s natural state of health.

We welcome you to our site!

Please read about the Metabolic Balancing Workbook; The Rhythms of Life and visit the pH store & services section where you will find recommended books and links to nutritional testing methods available to both doctors and individuals.

Be Well and Be Informed!

Jan Johnson

Basics of pH Control

Developing Your Program
Metabolic Balancing uses an organized approach to help you learn to recognize potential health problems before they occur. By developing an awareness of your physical responses to those factors influencing your health you can learn to take an active part in shaping your health.

Observing parallel changes in pH and your physical, mental or emotional state provides a feedback mechanism that serves as an early warning system to alert you to actions that may prove harmful to your health. Any unusual pH change that occurs when changing lifestyle factors will alert you to possible problems posed by choices not suited to your present state of health.

The Random Rat website provides information that enables you to discriminate between what you can do that will work for rather than against you. You know from working with the Metabolic Balancing program that this process develops slowly over time. You're sense of how to satisfy your nutritional needs continues to grow as each experience builds upon the last.

The recommendations provided on RandomRat.com provide useful information to all levels of experience or understanding. The publication of the Metabolic Balancing Workbook, The Rhythms of Life provides a foundation on which to build a growing awareness and understanding of your health needs.

Learning is a highly individual process and doesn't always occur in any set order. You retain only part of what you read or hear. As your knowledge base grows you retain increasingly more as your information begins to piece together. I think of learning in terms of critical mass. When you reach the point that you have gathered enough information, the bigger picture begins to emerge as you find those key pieces that pull it all together.

There will always be more questions than answers. This becomes a very creative state if you refuse to let it overwhelm you. When you accept that those little (and sometimes big) unknowns eventually fall into place, the process is far less stressful or overwhelming. Learning is not a linear process. As you expand your knowledge base your perspective shifts to include a bigger piece of the puzzle. A primary focus of this program is to learn from your experiences because in this way you simply retain more.

The Big Picture

The power of information lies in how you pull it together. If you assume a single cause for illness you get a limited picture that may miss the very information you need. Issues such as thyroid, digestive problems, fungal or bacterial infections are often singled out as the real underlying cause of illness. Rather than focusing on one aspect of health we need to learn how all aspects fit together and what they have in common. It is natural to focus on the obvious aches or pains experienced each day. Look at these issues in context of other functions of the body because we often find answers in unexpected places.

The pieces of the puzzle begin to come together when you begin to see the interconnectedness of all metabolic functions. Bit by bit you begin to chip away at what once was the "mystery" of health.

It's all about awareness

The key to understanding your health lies in your awareness of the information your body gives you every day. We are unaware of most of what goes on in our body because we either don't notice it or have learned to ignore it because are powerless to change it. Taking a lot for granted, we rarely consider the air around us or the food we put in our mouth or a million other things that we don't notice until something goes wrong to prompt our attention. Be aware of the way you feel, your energy level, how well you sleep, the foods you eat or crave, your thought processes and how well you cope with life. As you learn to understand these signals you can recognize potential problems before they develop into real problems.

It's never too late to start. If you already have health problems then your motivation is obvious. The body is a master at repair and healing. Learn to give your body what it needs, remove what it can't use and stand aside and let it do the rest.

The program is not merely about understanding how the human body functions. It's about learning how we as individuals function in our constantly changing circumstances. Most of what you learn through experience stays with you and comes together, little by little, into a workable picture. Widen your perspective on health. You have more control over it than your realize if you work to explore it!

For additional information regarding pH balancing see the Metabolic Balancing Workbook, The Rhythms of Life or address questions to questions@randomrat.com (RandomRat, Inc. P.O. Box 61745, Santa Barbara, California 93160 USA, 805-692-8577).

Know Your pH! Learn how your acid - alkaline balance profoundly affects how you feel.

All of Nature Seeks a Balance

The body's acid-alkaline balance is in many ways our first line of defense against illness. Learning how to make daily choices that protect this natural health-promoting balance is the first step towards optimizing your health.

Correcting acid or alkaline imbalances removes many superficial health problems that obscure underlying, more significant problems that must be addressed.

The Metabolic Balancing Program helps you identify what you are doing that supports or undermines your naturally protective acid-alkaline balance . Using your own experience in observing changes in urine pH, the Metabolic Balancing Workbook makes it possible to create individualized guidelines for diet, supplement and lifestyle factors that will enhance your health by maintaining this protective balance in your body's biochemistry.

Metabolic Balancing Workbook:
The Rhythms of Life 

Our health is orchestrated by the body's pH balance that cycles every twenty-four hours between acid and alkaline. much like the ebb and flow of ocean tides.

At night the body becomes more alkaline in order to sleep well and successfully repair injury and life's daily wear and tear. During the day we become more acid in order to create the energy required to digest and carry on normal daytime activities.

Almost everything we do influences this orderly cycle. By understanding the pH effect of influences in your life, you can learn to make nutritional and lifestyle choices that help avoid the many problems created by pH imbalances.

pH & Your Health by Jan Johnson

pH stands for “power of hydrogen” and for our purposes think of hydrogen as acidity. In term of our health pH refers to the amount of acidity in the body. The acid-alkaline balance in the body fluctuates according to the changing conditions in our lives: the time of day, what we eat and drink, activity levels and stress. The body naturally compensates for influences that might alter this balance - as long as the conditions are not too extreme. To function well – actually to survive, the body must protect the balance between these two opposites.

Our acid-alkaline balance is critical to our health and survival. The body works hard at maintaining this steady state of balance. Understanding the effects of acid-alkaline changes in your body allows you to take appropriate steps to support this life-giving balance.

pH as Measurement

PH also refers to the numerical scale used to measure the balance of acid and alkaline substances in a solution. The pH scale runs from 0 -14. The mid point, pH 7, is neutral representing an equal mix of acid and alkaline. The lower the number (below 7) the more acidic the solution. The higher the number (above pH 7) the more alkaline it is. Neutral in terms of urine pH is considered to be closer to 6.2 because of the nature of our body’s chemistry. Litmus paper is used to measure the pH of a solution. Also referred to as pH paper, it is treated with a dye that turns light green to darker green in alkaline solutions and yellow to orange in acid solutions.

Vinegar Vs. Baking Soda

We recognize acids as bitter or sour tasting liquids such as vinegar, which is a weak acid. Stronger acids like sulfuric or hydrochloride acids can be dangerously corrosive and burn through fabric or skin. An alkali, also called a base, is the opposite of an acid. Milk is a mild alkali while ammonia or lye are stronger, more corrosive alkalis. When mixed, acids and alkalis balance - or buffer each other. Adding an acid like vinegar to an alkali, such as baking soda produces a bubbling reaction as these opposites mix to neutralize each other. Weaker acids or alkalis when added to a strong acid or alkali will change the pH only slightly.

The body is fluid! We are about 60% water.

When speaking of pH we are referring to the acid or alkaline nature of solutions (containing water). The degree of acidity or alkalinity of the fluids in the body directly affects our health because pH changes speed up or slow down the countless chemical reactions occurring within our cells. The sum of these reactions is our metabolism - our biochemistry (bio = living – chemistry). This complex, yet orderly symphony of millions of chemical reactions is responsible for keeping us alive and well.

pH Changes Everything!

Because our body is roughly 60% water, the pH of body fluids has a profound affect on how well we function. In fact, we will die if the pH of the blood exceeds its critically narrow alkaline range. Different body fluids have subtle but significantly different pH ranges. An acid pH has a distinctly different effect on our tissues than an alkaline pH. Changes in pH exert a powerful control over the activities of all cells. Think of pH like a light switch. It turns things on or off, slows them down or speeds them up. A stable acid-alkaline balance insures that chemical reactions in the body take place in an orderly and efficient manner. Changes in our internal and external worlds continually challenge this balance. The time of day, what we eat and drink, activity levels, temperature, stress, toxins, illness and aging, supplements and medications all influence our pH. A healthy body naturally compensates for these influences provided the changes are neither extreme nor prolonged.

Three separate fluid areas.

The body has three separate fluids - each functions within a slightly different pH range. These include the fluid inside the cells, fluids that bathe the outside of the cells and the fluid part of the blood. The fluid inside the cells, while still alkaline is slightly more acid (i.e., slightly less alkaline) than the fluids outside the cells. Blood is the most alkaline of these fluids with a very narrow range of 7.35 – 7.45. The difference between these areas is instrumental in controlling cellular activities.

The wide range of pH in the body.

The body as a whole displays a wide range of pH values. The stomach pH is extremely acid. Hydrochloric acid is produced to create the acid environment (between pH 1 - 3) required for protein digestion. The alkaline blood pH however, cannot move anywhere near this acid pH without causing death. The skin remains slightly acid as a means of killing surface bacteria. In close proximity to the highly acidic stomach is the pancreas that is responsible for producing the alkaline digestive enzymes required for digestion.

Acid-Alkaline Balance

The body’s normal acid-alkaline balance is maintained when each separate area manages to functions within its own ideal pH range. This coordinated balance is accomplished by a miraculously complex system of checks and balances. The body’s organs, tissues and fluids communicate and cooperate in this process. Thanks to this natural balancing act, we can adapt to normal environmental changes in temperature, pH, light etc. The first priority of all body fluids and organ systems (cardiovascular, digestive etc.) is to compensate for any changes that might threaten the critically narrow alkaline range of the blood that is essential for survival. When outside influences become extreme, the body requires additional assistance from us, just as we would “help out” with protective clothing when temperatures fall.

Staying Balanced

Stressful lifestyles strain this natural adaptive mechanism. In times of stress, there are many ways we can provide support for our over-worked ability to cope with stress. Just as we would use warmer clothing in cold climates or increase liquids in dry environments, understanding the causes and effects of a pH imbalance allows us to avoid many stressors we may unwittingly create with our diet and lifestyle habits.

What causes Imbalance? Stress, of course!

The many disguises of stress.

The obvious stressors are easy to spot - injuries, illness, poor nutrition, sleep problems, death in the family, divorce, marriage – most major life changes and so on. A chronic imbalance is usually due to combined forms of stress that persist over time.

Less obvious forms of stress including inadequate diets, skipping meals, lack of or excessive exercise, sleep patterns, medications and improper supplementation -all have the potential to throw our chemistry into the chaos and disorder typical of a pH imbalance. A growing imbalance creates its own momentum. The longer the imbalance goes untreated, the greater the momentum the more disruptive to our health. As the situation persists cells and organs become less efficient at everything. The imbalance becomes the biggest stress, as the body’s chemistry grows increasingly chaotic and inefficient. We can however, intervene with corrective measures before this happens.

Identifying Stress

Few if any people think about their health in terms of pH. PH remains a silent factor until the signs of an acid or alkaline imbalance are recognized. Each individual has strengths and weaknesses. Some feel stress in one way - perhaps as tension headaches, while others may experience digestive problems, joint pain, fatigue, anxiety or even depression. These noticeable changes in symptoms often occur along with erratic or extreme pH changes and become a red flag alerting us to a growing imbalance.

Urine pH Patterns point out Hidden Stressors.

Changes in urine pH reflect the entire body’s coordinated attempts to maintain a balance within all areas.

Normal Urine pH Pattern.

A normal urine pH remains closer to the biological mid point of pH 6.2. Normal fluctuations above or below this point are for the most part minor and short lived. This naturally fluctuating pattern changes over the course of the day but rarely gets “stuck” in the extreme ranges indicating that our body is coping well with stress.

The Stress Pattern

When stress overwhelms the body’s ability to cope, the inability to maintain the acid-alkaline balance becomes evident in the urine pH. Erratic or extreme changes in urine pH point to an increased level of physiological stress. A stress pattern displays erratic changes, usually within the course of the day, or may stay excessively acid or alkaline for a prolonged period of time. A growing imbalance becomes most obvious when such changes are accompanied by intensified physical pain or by mental or emotional disturbances.

Removing Stressors

Most people don’t consider the acid or alkaline effect of the foods they eat and even fewer consider the pH effect of the supplements they take. Overly acid or alkaline food and/or supplement choices can create an acid or alkaline excess or exaggerate an existing imbalance. The pH Chart of Effects provided in the Metabolic Balancing Workbook lists the pH effect of foods, supplements, medications and various activities. When familiar with these influences, you can work to create a more balanced and supportive pH effect with your nutrition and activity choices.

Combating Fatigue

Balance Your Foods for Better Energy.
Normal energy production is essential for a well-balanced body. A balance of fuel types – fats, proteins and carbohydrates is instrumental in producing stable energy levels. Consuming a balance of quality fats, proteins and carbohydrates at regular intervals throughout the day creates more consistent energy levels by providing more complete nutrition. A common response to low energy coupled with sluggish digestion is to avoid fats and proteins, as they are more difficult to digest and cause more digestive problems. Consistently low energy levels will often produce food cravings that favor the more easily digested carbohydrates, sugar, refined grains, fruits and vegetables - at the expense of the essential fats and proteins required by every cell and function in the body.

Addressing Imbalance with Digestive Support

Underling causes of imbalance are best addressed by first correcting faulty digestion and elimination. A pH imbalance weakens our ability to properly digest our foods and convert them into the raw materials and energy required for life. Poor elimination accompanies poor digestion and inadequate nutrition.

Dietary changes are easier to make and adhere to with effective digestive support. Poor digestion is always a consideration with chronically low energy, weight gain and when food allergies are suspected. Stress, aging and illness all interfere with normal digestion.

For the most part digestion starts in the stomach where hydrochloric acid is produced to create the very acid (pH 1-3) environment required for protein digestion. The pancreas takes over after the food passes out of the stomach into the small intestine for the second part of digestion. Here food is mixed with alkaline digestive enzymes produced by the pancreas to complete digestion of all food types. A deficiency of either of these digestive aids interferes with the orderly and effective steps of digestion. Improperly digested foods rob the body of vital nutrients while creating considerable stress on the body.

Basic Support

Many factors contribute to poor digestion, however adding basic support with hydrochloric acid and pancreatic enzymes will start the process of restoring proper digestion. Because hydrochloric acid is highly acidic it should always be added with caution and taken only with food in very low doses to insure stomach irritation does not occur – in which case it should be discontinued. Because it is an acid, taken with meals it will help balance excess alkalinity. Conversely if too much is used it can produce excess acidity.

An acid imbalance on the other hand may respond to supplemental pancreatic enzymes. These alkaline enzymes both help balance acidity and benefit digestion, particularly the digestion of carbohydrates and fats that are so critical for weight control and sustained energy production.

Are your supplements supporting or undermining your Acid-Alkaline Balance?

Nutritional supplements are a concentrated form of nutrients. Many have a strong acid or alkaline effect that is amplified with higher doses. When the pH effect of supplements is not taken into consideration, high does may create an imbalance that in effect, negates nutrient benefits by disrupting orderly body chemistry. It is vital to understand both the function and the pH effects of your supplements before you take them on a regular basis. You can avoid unwanted setbacks by understanding the pH effect and by carefully and slowly integrating new supplements into a balanced diet plan.

The unrecognized and often significant stress created by inappropriate diets and supplements are easily avoided by learning to balance your meals, supplements and even your activities for a combined pH support. The benefits of understanding the nature of your acid-alkaline balance are well worth the effort Becoming aware of the cause and effect relationships between how you feel, your pH, the nutrients you consume and the various activities influencing your acid-alkaline balance can greatly improve your overall health and well-being.

"Metabolic Balancing Workbook, The Rhythms of Life": Like our planet, we are driven by a symphony of rhythms. These internal rhythms organize and direct the seemingly infinite number of functions required for life. These stabilizing and organizing rhythms are essential for good health. Price - 24.95 (Note: Contact Jan at 805-692-8577 or by e-mail at jjohnson@randomrat.com -- I don't know if it's still available)

Circadian Rhythms

Circa = about, dian =day…..daily rhythms.
Circadian rhythms are those that repeat themselves roughly every twenty-four hours. The most obvious of these being our sleep-wake cycle. Countless other rhythms are held in place by this influential and fundamental, circadian rhythm.

pH Is Rhythm

The body's acid-alkaline balance displays a rhythm of it own. Urine pH changes mirror the shift from daytime to nighttime metabolic functions. Active daytime hours produce more acids whereas the more passive nighttime activities produce greater alkalinity. The more resilient this balance, the better our health.

Almost everything we do: diet, supplements, activities and our daily habits continualy affect this balancing act. Unrelenting stress diminishes our adaptive ability. Poor diet, lack of sleep or exercise, injuries, illness and aging all work to slowly erode the stability of protective biological rhythms.

The Metabolic Balancing Workbook teaches you ways to identify and to compensate for the many of the effects of life's stress. The greater your understanding of the pH effects of stress, the greater your control over your health.

The workbook explains how to monitor and adjust sequential urine pH patterns. These patterns directly affect your well-being and are shaped by diet, supplements, exercise, activities and inherited tendencies. Over time, you will begin to see what pH range best suits you. In this range you feel better, are more energetic and have fewer physical and emotional complaints.

Your observations will alert you to factors that reinforce or disrupt this balance.

The required tools for pH balancing are simple. PH paper, also called litmus paper, is used to measure urine pH. Worksheets and charts help organize and interpret your observations.

The Metabolic Balancing Workbook helps you learn from your own experience of your body. Whether you are healthy, tired, or battling chronic illness you will benefit by developing effective ways to support your body's acid-alkaline balance. The end results are new habit patterns and clearer choices to enhance rather than undermine your health.

* The Metabolic Balancing Workbook: The Rhythms of Life by Jan Johnson is available at our bookstore or by calling the office of RandomRat Inc. at 805-692-8577.

The Basics of pH Control

Understanding the control of your pH is fundamental to Metabolic Balancing. Everything you do in some way effects your pH and conversely your pH affects everything you do. A multitude of events both in your internal and external worlds interact to determine your pH patterns. Foods, supplements and the type and intensity of your activities all have an impact on your pH. The body's survival depends upon its ability to effectively perform the many functions required to adapt to the constantly changing factors in these two environments. It is this adaptive ability that insures the internal stability to maintain the organization of vital biochemical processes. The healthy body silently carries out a miraculous web of events to maintain this balance. It is our job to know how to protect this natural ability by providing proper nutrition and by limiting the burdens we place upon it.

To support this ability we must be able to determine what it is we need and equally as important - what we don't need. We make a significant difference in our long-term health when we base our choices on what we know is best for our own unique state of health. Whether we are healthy or stressed by chronic illness or fatigue, selecting appropriate choices in diet, supplements and activities provides many long term benefits that significantly affect our quality of life.

Starting from the Basics

We need to understand and be aware of the many internal and external forces that interact to determine our health. Many of the beneficial or harmful influences are obvious yet many more are not. We are aware of the problems caused by lack of sleep or lack of exercise yet for the most part remain unaware of the body's internal rhythms responsible for orchestrating this process called life. To learn how to support these rhythms we must first understand our own unique balancing act.

The internal balance of rhythms is most obvious in the fluctuations of the acid-alkaline balance seen in urine pH. We can learn a great deal about the body's complex internal chemistry by observing connections between pH, physical well-being and related activities,

Sequential pH Chart

The Sequential pH Chart found in the "Metabolic Balancing Workbook" is designed to help you organize your observations. Measure and record your urine pH throughout the day using pH paper that is also called litmus paper. Litmus paper is chemically treated to turn various shades of color that correlate with the numerical scale of pH. The paper turns shades of yellow/orange in acid solutions and blue/green in alkaline solutions. A color graph showing numbers that correspond to colors comes with the pH paper.

Check your pH frequently throughout the day and as you do focus on how you feel. Record your pH and your comments about any physical complaints you may have. The more detailed your notes the more insight you gain from your observations.

Comfort Range

As you observe your pH you will find that you tend to feel better within a certain pH range. This is simply the range in which your chemistry is most efficient. This Comfort Range differs from person to person and it changes over time. Some people feel best when acid around pH 5 while others feel better more alkaline around pH 6 or 7. Problems start to arise when the pH stays too alkaline or acid for a prolonged period of time. It is not uncommon to have a different set of problems in either extreme. In the extreme ranges your metabolic functions are simply less efficient. Consequently you produce small errors that compound over time into real problems. An illness may seem that it "came out of nowhere" but in reality it was developing, often silently over a long period of time. When we recognize subtle early warning signs we can make corrections that will help avoid many problems.

Using Foods to Support Your pH

The pH nature of foods, supplements and common activities are listed in the Chart of pH Effects in the "Metabolic Balancing Workbook". Having identified your comfort range, record your diet in the column under "Food". Review the pH of the foods you eat most frequently using the Chart of pH Effect. Record the pH of each food in the columns provided. Any food can have a pH effect on you that is different from that listed in the chart. There are many reasons for this including problems with digestion, liver function and your metabolic state. Regardless of what the chart says, add or omit this food based on your own pH reaction. The reasons for you response become clearer as you continue to learn from the program. Regardless of what the pH of a food "should" be, avoid or include anything according to how it effects your pH.

Foods can change your pH as well as how you feel. Review your Sequential pH charts to find the range within which you feel best. View your pH patterns in context of how you feel and what you eat. Certain kinds of foods may be too acid or too alkaline for you. Identify those foods that you feel may throw your pH off balance. Use them or avoid them as needed to balance or counterbalance your comfort range.

The time of day can affect your pH.

All the biochemical reactions that keep you alive and well make up what is called your metabolism. These functions fall into the two categories of catabolic and anabolic metabolism. The daytime functions make up catabolic metabolism creating the energy and raw materials your body needs. The night time resting and repair functions make up the anabolic metabolism and are responsible for building the substances your body needs to function. The raw materials created from the food we eat during the daytime catabolic metabolism are then used in anabolic metabolism to build what we need to function, to heal and to repair. These two phases of metabolism make up the body's dominant rhythm cycling back and forth over the course of the twenty-four hour day.

Circadian Rhythms

This shift from day to nighttime activity is the most fundamental rhythm of the body. Because it occurs over a twenty-four hour period it is called a circadian rhythm. Circa means about and -dian means day, hence circadian rhythm. These rhythms repeat their full cycle within the twenty-four hours of each day.

This two-phased cycle shifting between daytime anabolic and night time catabolic metabolism is reflected in the normal shift between acid and alkaline urine pH over the course of the day. The pH begins to reflect acidity late in the morning and increases with activity. This acid phase peaks in late afternoon about 4 or 5 o' clock and winds down into the night. A shift into the alkaline less active phase begins usually during sleep, peaks around 3-4 A.M. continuing until 10 or 11 in the morning.

The cycle from acidity into alkalinity and back again reflects the dominant rhythm of the body. It is controlled in part by our internal pacemaker. This "body clock" is located deep inside the brain. The day-night rhythm is reinforced by the light change from day to night. Fluctuations in urine pH reflect many internal changes as the body cycles back and forth and back again in a perpetual organizing rhythm.

Alkaline imbalance

The morning shift into alkalinity can be a problem for those who tend to be too alkaline. When compounded by the intake of very alkaline foods and supplements at breakfast, morning alkalinity can result in low energy and various and increase of a variety of aches and pains. The excess alkalinity makes it difficult for the body to produce the energy for digestion and the shift into the more acidic daytime functions. To avoid the drain of excess morning alkalinity, counterbalance this tendency with your first meal by emphasizing acidic foods and supplements.

You experience this shift into daytime catabolic activity as an acidic change in pH and as an increase in energy as your body begins to come fully awake. It is also seen in the change to an acid pH. You are more able to balance alkaline foods or supplements once this acid shift occurs. Too many alkaline nutrients in the morning can delay this important shift until much later into the day. Some people don't shift into the more energetic catabolic metabolism until much later in the day or even late into the night. This change in metabolism accounts for what we call the Larks, the early birds, who wake up early versus the night owls who only come alive at night staying active well into the early morning.

Acid Imbalance

Use your foods and supplements to prevent excess acidity or alkalinity. The acid cycle peaks around 4 o'clock in the afternoon winding down into the night. Use alkaline foods to counterbalance an acid pH if you tend to be too acid. As a rule it is best to combine acid and alkaline foods using slightly more of one to offset a possible imbalance. Use acid foods to prevent excess alkalinity and use alkaline foods to offset excess acidity.

Using supplements to support your pH.

You may not be able to balance your pH with foods alone either because of a long -standing imbalance or because of poor digestion. These conditions limit the body's ability to absorb enough nutrients for adequate energy production. You can use nutritional supplements to bridge this gap until energy and digestion improve.

With your comfort range in mind, review the Chart of pH Effects to check the effect of your supplements. As supplements are more concentrated they have a more intense and sometimes faster effect on pH than foods. Supplements like foods can offset any imbalance when consumed properly. Choose your foods based on their pH effect as well as their role as fats, proteins or carbohydrates in energy production. Supplements also have a variety of functions that makes them useful under different circumstances and at different times of the day. Supplements, like foods are most beneficial when used according to both their specific function and their pH effect. Your dinner can affect how you feel in the morning!

The food and supplements you choose for dinner effect your sleep and how you feel in the morning. Keep in mind that the effect of your evening meal is affected by the body's momentum towards the morning alkaline metabolism. An alkaline dinner become even more alkaline when compounded with the alkaline effect of sleep and the increasing momentum of morning anabolic metabolism. Choose a more acid dinner to offset a tendency towards a morning alkaline excess. In this way you can use your understanding of foods, activities and the body's metabolic cycles greater control over your state of health.

Do not be concerned if you don't immediately see correlations between what you consume and how you feel. Each body responds in many different ways. The healthy metabolism manages this complex balance with little added support. The depleted and fatigued body struggles to maintain normal ranges often falling easily into imbalance. You may not see any connections until you start to suffer from a cold or flu or other intense form of stress. When the pH remains outside normal ranges for a prolonged period of time, small problems begin to build due to the mistakes of metabolic inefficiency. As you record your pH over time you will see why your pH patterns change and how to control them. With time you begin to see how these changes effect you and more importantly, what you can do to support and maintain your body's natural rhythms and balance.

Are You Confused About Some of These Questions?

Q & A… Which foods are acid and which are alkaline?
Many factors contribute to the pH effect foods have when metabolized by the body. Some inherently acidic or alkaline foods create the opposite pH affect when used by the body and the pH of some foods may change when cooked.

Q & A… Are we all too acidic?
Many people fear that they are too acid. This is not entirely wrong, nor is it entirely correct. There are many varying areas of pH within the body. Different body fluids and organs function within different pH ranges. The pH of fluids and tissues also change over the course of a day. The body produces more acids during the day and less at night making it naturally more alkaline during sleep and relaxation.
What role does pH play in your health?

Jan Johnson is a nutritional researcher and consultant living in Santa Barbara. Her extensive research in health and nutrition was prompted by a cancer diagnosis in the early 1970s and a subsequent eight-year battle with Chronic Fatigue and Multiple Chemical Sensitivities that resulted from over 15 years of chemical exposures as an artist.

In 1988 she published her insightful research in Metabolic Balancing: An Organizational Workbook. The workbook teaches individuals how to develop an indivdualized health maintenance program based on their own unique experiences and needs.

In 2002 Jan founded Random Rat Inc. to publish the updated workbook. The current edition, Metabolic Balancing: The Rhythms of Life is available.

Jan is hosting a series of Nutrition Education Workshops. For information see events or contact us by phone at 805-692-8577 or by e-mail at jjohnson@randomrat.com.

Welcome to the Winter Cold & Flu Season! (What acidity and alkalinity have to do with bacterial and viral infections)

There are many things you can do to help avoid the colds and flu of winter. What you eat and the supplements you choose affect your natural resistance to infection. Knowing which foods to avoid and which supplements to take can significantly increase your chances of avoiding those nagging infections altogether. Information about ordering the supplements discussed here with the discount offered at randomrat.com is provided at the end of the article. Questions can be sent to questions@randomrat.com.

Managing your acid-alkaline balance, diet and supplements to help avoid winter misery!

Along with the New Year, January brings in the winter cold and flu season. Every year seems to bring more warnings about flu epidemics and nagging colds. Along with the bad winter weather, our long holiday season of increased sugar indulgence helps set the stage for winter cold and flu misery.

Not everyone exposed to a "bug" gets sick. The healthier you are - the stronger your immune system, the less likely you are to succumb to every bug that comes your way. We can increase our natural resistance if we watch what we eat, fortify our body with a few carefully chosen supplements and maintain a stable acid-alkaline balance.

October sets the stage for the winter cold and flu season!

The cold weather starting in October increases our risk of getting sick. The increased sugar consumption starting at Halloween however can play an even larger part in predisposing us to infection. By the time we get through all the holiday cookies, chocolates, alcohol and New Years celebrations, our bodies call out for help. Motivated by holiday weight gain, willpower is eventually summoned and the New Year finds many cutting back on sweets and returning to the gym to get back in shape again.

Sugar!

A diet high in sugar increases the likelihood of infection because sugar feeds pathogenic (disease-causing) bacteria lurking deep inside sinuses, throat, lungs and intestines. These foreign invaders grow stronger as they feast on the sugar we consume. Next time you get hit with a bad cold or flu, you may look back and realize that your sugar intake or alcohol consumption (also a form of sugar) was higher than usual.

PH, Sugar & Immune Function

The Importance of pH Balance

The complex biochemistry that diligently keeps us alive and well functions best when the body maintains a normal acid-alkaline balance. We are less likely to get sick when we avoid those influences that alter the naturally protective acid-alkaline balance. A stable pH increases natural resistance, helps us tolerate stress, sleep better and more effectively digest and assimilate the nutrients in our foods.

Chronic, unrelenting stress whether from a poor diet, physical or mental/emotional stress undermines the body's acid-alkaline balance. PH imbalanced systems throughout the body create havoc within our cells and organs, leaving us more tired and prone to infection. One of the first signs of the body loosing the battle against excessive stress is seen as a change in urine pH as normal ranges are replaced by acid or alkaline extremes.

Sugar and pH

Sugar has a profound effect on our pH. Initially it acts as a stimulant. Sugar is a quick burn "food" that increases acidity by stimulating energy production. This spike in both energy and acidity is followed by a swing in the opposite direction towards increased alkalinity accompanied by an energy letdown. The quick burn of sugar wears off and the body settles into a more alkaline (anabolic) metabolic mode appropriate for rest and repair. A healthy body compensates for "moderate" sugar consumption. Excessive sugar intake however, especially during stressful times eventually disrupts the stable acid-alkaline balance throughout the many systems of the body.

Sugar creates problems in your gut!

The gut, meaning your digestive tract - is a large organ, or series of organs, housing millions of bacteria. A healthy balance of several hundred types of good bacteria helps maintain a stable pH throughout the digestive tract. The excessive intake of sugary, simple carbohydrate foods produces higher levels of alkalinity in the gut creating the perfect environment for bad bacteria to overwhelm the colonies of good, acid-forming bacteria. Many types of disease-causing bacteria thrive in a highly alkaline environment. Many of these "bad" bacteria make things worse by producing alkaline byproducts as a protective mechanism to maintain their own favored alkaline environment. If your gut "ecosystem" already contains more bad (alkaline-producing) bacterial than good (acid-producing) bacteria, excessive sugar consumption can tip the scales in favor of bad bacteria to proliferate and overwhelm the immune system leaving you open to the next cold, flu, or worse.

A high level of alkalinity (and often ammonia produced by an overgrowth of bacteria) affects the body in numerous ways. Excessive alkalinity suppresses the body's energy production and with it the ability to deliver much needed oxygen to every cell in the body. The stomach reduces its production of hydrochloric acid required for protein digestion. Protein digestion suffers leaving us bloated or uncomfortably full and heavy-feeling after meals. Avoiding protein eventually creates deficiencies of essential amino acids supplied by protein. Without adequate protein in the diet we come to rely too heavily on high carbohydrate foods creating problems that go along with excessive carbohydrate intake. Weight gain, insulin resistance, hormone imbalances, adrenal stress, immune suppression and protein and essential fatty acid deficiencies are some of the problems associated with high carbohydrate diets that restrict high quality proteins and fats.

What about milk? Milk is also a source of sugar.

Milk contains a considerable amount of sugar and carbohydrates in spite of its protein content. Typically a cup of milk has about 8 grams of sugar, (8 grams of carbohydrates) and 8 grams of protein. Even for those who tolerate the lactose form of sugar found in milk, this additional source of sugar consumed during an infection may aggravate or lengthen the actual course of infection. Being an alkaline food, milk can further alkalinize the gut and promote bacterial overgrowth. Even if you tolerate milk products, you may find that avoiding milk products while fighting your next cold or flu may shorten your recovery time!

Not all sugars are bad -- except maybe, during an infection.

Fruit (not fruit juice) as a sugar source is far better (unless you have active cancer) than candies, desserts and the sugar in alcohol. A good diet includes several servings of both fruits and vegetables for fiber, minerals and antioxidants. However, because bacteria and yeasts thrive on most forms of sugar, fruit and especially the concentrated sugar in fruit juices may also prolong an infection. Partially because of their sugar content, fruit and especially the more concentrated fruit juices have a highly alkaline effect while additionally providing a sugar source that feeds and strengthen alkaline producing bacteria.

What about orange juice for extra vitamin C? Drinking that extra glass of OJ when you have a cold may not be such a good idea! For the most part, the modest amount of vitamin C found in orange juice is usually not enough to offset the advantage it affords the bacteria that we so diligently try to fight!

Fruit of course in an important part of a healthy diet and when eaten in moderation does not cause problems when the gut has a healthy balance of good bacteria to keep disease-causing bacteria in check.

Fighting Infection with a Healthy Gut

Healthy Digestion First

If your urine pH is too alkaline

Most bacteria cannot thrive in an acid environment. The naturally acid pH of the stomach both kills pathogens that enter through the mouth and also acts as a barrier to keep the bacteria in the gut from migrating up to the sinuses, throat and lungs. Studies show that people who do not produce sufficient stomach acid have more upper respiratory (lung, sinuses etc.) infections than those with normal stomach acid.

Supplemental hydrochloric acid tablets can be taken with meals to restore stomach acidity and improve protein digestion. Always start any hydrochloric acid supplement at the lowest possible dose to be sure that it does not cause stomach irritation. If stomach tissues are overly sensitive due to either excess acidity or alkalinity, hydrochloric acid will cause irritation. Start with 1/4 or 1/2 dose with a meal to check for sensitivity. Always take with food unless taking a buffered hydrochloric acid supplement (available in the Metabolic Balancing Products in the pH Store). Even the buffered form may cause problems with an overly sensitive stomach so always test first with a very low dose with food.

If irritation does occur, stop hydrochloric acid supplements.

If your urine pH is very alkaline you may need the hydrochloric acid but may need to start at 1/4 doses and slowly work up. Never continue if irritation continues at any dose.

If your urine pH is too acid.

if your urine pH is very acid (pH 4-5), do not take supplemental hydrochloric acid even if you suspect you have a problem digesting protein,. A strong acidifier, hydrochloric acid will create too much additional acidity. The underlying causes of excess acidity must be addressed first. Not all pathogens produce alkaline by-products. Yeasts can produce toxic acid by-products. When increased sugar or carbohydrate intake creates excess acidity, a yeast overgrowth may be involved.

The body also produces many kinds of organic acids that can build up and interfere with normal metabolic pathways. These are produced in abnormal quantities as a result of nutrient deficiencies, toxins and infections. Excess acidity from any source must be addressed to avoid the problems created from an acid imbalance. Many conditions can block the normal elimination of the acids produced in the body. The build up of toxins inside the cells, inadequate liver detoxification, a lack of available oxygen (hypoxia) and lack of exercise or circulation also contribute to excess acidity.

For excess acidity, start with pancreatic Enzymes.

The first phase of digestion in the stomach requires acidity for protein digestion. The second phase of digestion begins in the small intestine and requires an alkaline environment to stimulate the release of pancreatic enzymes that digest fats, carbohydrates and proteins. Just as excess alkalinity can block the production of hydrochloric acid in the stomach, excess acidity can also block the action of enzymes produced in the pancreas. Pancreatic enzymes continue the second phase of digestion as food passes down the digestive tract. If the body is overwhelmed with excess acidity, these enzymes will not work properly and digestion will suffer. If you find that you have problems digesting and are consistently too acid, you may benefit from using pancreatic enzymes.

Buffered Pancreatic Enzymes

If your urine pH is consistently too acid, be sure to use an enzyme formula that is alkaline. Many pancreatic enzyme formulas are quite acid due either to binders and fillers used in the manufacturing process or high levels of the protease enzyme. Protease, the protein-digesting enzyme is highly acidic and can irritate sensitive stomach tissues. Use a "buffered" form to be sure that the formula is alkaline, not acid. Always take pancreatic enzymes after meals.

For a balanced pH, a two-phase digestive enzyme.

Two-phase digestive enzyme formulas contain hydrochloric acid for the initial phase of digestion in the stomach and an enteric coated or time released pancreatic enzyme complex for the second phase of digestion in the small intestine. These balanced formulas help digest proteins, carbohydrates and fats and can be taken with both meals and snacks. Because they do contain hydrochloric acid, always take on a full stomach and discontinue if stomach irritation occurs.

Probiotics for beneficial bacteria and a healthy gut!

If your urine pH is highly alkaline there is a good chance that the gut -- your colon, is also too alkaline. Probiotics cultures (mixed strains of beneficial microorganisms) help restore a normal colon pH. Good bacteria however need a healthy environment and will not live in an unhealthy environment created by a poor diet with excessive sugar intake. Be sure to correct your diet along with adding Probiotics. Not everyone needs to supplement with bacterial cultures. Try a Probiotics supplement for 1-2 weeks and then stop for a week or two to be sure you tolerate the supplement. Continue on a 1-2 week basis every month if you find that it helps stabilize balance your pH, normalize digestion and or elimination and is not creating increased gas, constipation or diarrhea.

Which types?

Originally mostly single cultures of lactobacillus acidophilus or bifidobacterium were sold, however it has been found that mixed cultures are more effective at improving the balance of bacteria in the colon. Unless you have had a stool test to analyze the actual types of bacterial present in your colon, it may take some experimenting to find which cultures will work best for your specific gut "ecosystem". You may want to periodically change the type of Probiotics culture you use to be sure you create a balanced mix of bacterial cultures in your colon.

When adding a Probiotic, do not add other supplements or make dietary changes for at least a couple weeks until you get a sense of how well your body tolerates the Probiotics. First watch for changes in urine pH. Also pay attention to any changes in stomach or bowel function. Notice if it helps normalize bowel function or increases constipation, diarrhea, bloating or gas. Change your supplement if you have problems with the one you are taking or do not get results however, remember, not everyone needs Probiotics . It is possible to have an overgrowth of good bacteria so do not overdo it. Given a healthy environment in the gut, the bacterial cultures you take will grow and increase in number on their own.

To control pH when fighting infection...a summary.

As described above, excessive alkalinity can inhibit your ability to fight off infection when struggling with a cold or flu. There are many factors that create excess alkalinity, many of which may be aggravated during times of infection. Whatever you can do to keep your urine pH out of the alkaline range during this time will hasten your recovery. As mentioned above avoiding alkaline foods for this time period will help stabilize pH and inhibit pathogens. Avoiding fruits, vegetables, dairy products and high carbohydrate meals during this time limits the sugar that feeds bacteria and other pathogens.

If restricting the more alkaline foods does not correct excess alkalinity, you can use ammonium chloride to acidify urine pH. Ammonium chloride can be taken with or between meals as needed to offset an alkaline urine pH. If you have a history of a sensitive stomach always test any new acid supplement first at low doses and take with food instead of between meals.

Excess acidity will also inhibit the immune system by blocking key metabolic pathways. If your urine pH is consistently below pH 5, review the supplements that you are currently taking and reduce or eliminate acidic supplements. A buffered form of Vitamin C in capsules or powder will help offset excess acidity. (If you are too acidic) Avoid Vitamin C formulas that are "buffered" with ascorbates as they are still quite acidic. The buffering agent must be a mineral form of bicarbonate to have the alkaline effect you need. Most forms of calcium and magnesium are alkaline (see "carriers" on this page for which ones) and can be used as well to offset excess acidity. (Jan's Metabolic Balancing Workbook contains a list of alkaline foods and supplements.)

Laying the Groundwork

Any substance that supports immune function will work better given a healthy environment in the body. No supplements alone can make-up for a terrible diet or a lack of nutritional commonsense. Beyond a good diet, adequate sleep and exercise, the first step in immune support is to be sure that you meet the basic requirements for essential vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Your body requires vitamins and minerals in order to maintain a normal immune response and needs antioxidants to protect your cells from normal oxidative damage due to free radical formation. A recently concluded long-term study on the benefits of taking a Multi-Vitamin and Mineral with anti-oxidants (Vitamin C, and A, or Beta Carotene and Vitamin E) has convinced the medical community that consistent daily supplementation significantly lowers the incidence of many major illnesses. Even reluctant doctors are starting to see that in our times of fast food and mounting stress - those who take basic supplementations fare better than those who do not.

Diet!

Eating balanced meals at regular intervals during the day in one of the best way to avoid needless stress on your body that can stress your immune system. Any cumulative stress impacts your immune system and skipping meals or relying on high carbohydrate foods wreaks havoc with your blood sugar, insulin, adrenals and hormone levels. A balance of quality proteins, fats and moderate high-fiber carbohydrates at regular meals throughout the day will help stabilize blood sugar and energy production as well as provide the macro-nutrients (fats, proteins, carbohydrates) and the micro-nutrients (vitamins, minerals and related nutrients) you require to function. You are a complex "piece of machinery" and your body requires a variety of foods and nutrients to function optimally. Skipping meals creates a significant stress on your body's energy producing systems and eventually creates a dependence on carbohydrates and stimulants like coffee, sugar or nicotine.

Supplements for Immune Support

Use your supplements to support, not imbalance your pH.

Supplements have a pH effect that can be even more direct than foods because of their concentrated nature. When used properly, the right supplements help maintain a healthy pH balance and when used incorrectly, can perpetuate an imbalance. Whatever supplement you use, understand what it does and how it affects your pH before making additions to your supplement program.

Limit your choice to a select few. Find those that "work" for you. Each functions differently and knowing these differences influences how well they work for you. You may need immune support only at specific times, depending on your situation. If fighting a cold or flu, take additional supplements at the very first sign of infection and continue one to two weeks after you have recovered. Many people need added immune support during the winter months and none during the warmer spring and summer months. If you have a chronic immune problem you may want support on a regular basis. If you have allergies you may find that immune support will help avoid problems that consistently occur with the change of seasons. Decide what you need and plan for optimal support.

The Basics: Vitamin C, A & Zinc.

These three basics nutrients form the cornerstone of a healthy immune function and should be supplied to ensure resistance to infection as well as support antioxidant protection against free radical damage.

Vitamin C

Many people successfully avoid colds just taking extra Vitamin C during the winter months. You do not have to take massive amounts of vitamin C to get immune benefits. Between 750 and 1000 milligrams a day can be quite effective at preventing infection. Higher doses may be needed once an infection takes hold. Vitamin C is water-soluble so it is more effective if taken in divided doses throughout the day with meals. The pure ascorbic acid form of C is very acidic and should be avoided as it can cause stomach or bladder irritation. Numerous types of Vitamin C are available that are buffered with mineral ascorbates or bicarbonates. Ester C and Ascorbyl Palmitate (a fat soluble form) are still quite acidic however they are not as caustic as pure ascorbic acid.

Vitamin A & Beta Carotene

Vitamin A helps fight infection along with protecting vision and keeping cells healthy. Vitamin A toxicity is a consideration because it is a fat soluble vitamin and unlike vitamin C, is stored in fatty tissues (such as the liver) and can build up to toxic levels. It is best to use a multi-carotene supplement. The warning signs of excess Vitamin A intake are experienced as a tight band-like headache or excessively dry, chapped lips. Unless high does of A have been taken for a long time, problems usually subside quickly when discontinued. To avoid any build-up it is always a good idea to skip the supplement a couple days a week. Excess intake of Beta Carotene (taking beta carotene alone is not recommended unless it is part of a balanced multi-carotene formula) will show up as an orange discoloration of the skin as sometimes occurs in those who consume very large quantities of carrots.

Zinc

It is easy to tell if you need zinc by using a liquid zinc taste test. Test your zinc status when taking supplemental zinc using the zinc taste test to avoid taking excess zinc. A dilution of zinc is held in the mouth for several seconds. The taste you experience will indicate your zinc levels. Follow directions on the bottle. Generally if you experience no taste you need zinc and if it tastes metallic you have sufficient zinc.

Olive Leaf Extract

Olive leaf extract is fairly acidic substance. It has potent anti-microbial activity, meaning it helps kill viral, bacterial and fungal pathogens. Caution must be used when starting olive leaf extract if significant fungal infection or toxicity present. To avoid a "die-off" reaction when killing yeasts, start slowly with very small doses to be sure it is well tolerated and gradually work up to higher doses. For those who are particularly sensitive to candida die-off, the supplement can be taken every other day or a day or so on followed by several days off until tolerated in higher doses.

Maitake

The Chinese and Japanese have used mushrooms for centuries by for their immune enhancing properties. Mushrooms contain polysaccharides, especially beta-glucans that increase natural killer cell activity to increase resistance to many disease-causing pathogens. The Maitake mushroom is also considered a general tonic. Most maitake formulas are usually mildly alkaline.

Echinacea & Goldenseal

These two herbs provide general immune support against infection and are work synergistically to improve immune function. As Echinacea is alkaline and goldenseal is acid, combining the two results in a more pH balanced formula.

Not all supplements are created equal!

The Metabolic Balancing Workbook lists the general pH effect of commonly used supplements. However, there is a considerable difference in the pH effect of the same substances depending on the manufacturer . The different forms of nutrients, (i.e. oxide versus citrate etc.) as well as the binders and fillers used in production methods can dramatically change the pH effects of supplements.

For additional information regarding pH balancing see the Metabolic Balancing Workbook, The Rhythms of Life or address questions to questions@randomrat.com .

Beyond the Atkins Diet: What does Stress have to do with High Carbohydrate diets??

Using pH Balancing, Diet and Supplements to cut the Vicious Cycle of Stress, Weight Gain and Depression.

Look for the next newsletter to learn how chronic stress sets the stage for reliance of high carbohydrates diets. Excessive carbohydrates increase the stress placed on many body systems to make it even more difficult to function well, cope with life in general and to make the healthy dietary choices needed to break this cycle of stress.

E-mail your questions regarding featured articles and the Metabolic Balancing Program to questions@randomrat.com or click on the Contact Us link in the main menu.

Glossary

Acidity: The degree of sourness or sharpness of taste. The ability of a chemical to yield hydrogens ions to a solution. In a solution, a measurement below 7.0 pH.

Alkalinity: The ability of a chemical solution to absorb hydrogens ions from a solution. A pH measurement above 7.0 pH. Pertaining to the acid-base relationship of any solution that has fewer hydrogen ions or more hydroxyl ions than pure water which is considered chemically neutral with a pH of 7.0
Anabolism/Anabolic: The phase of metabolism in which simple substances are synthesized into the complex materials of living tissue.

Assimilation: The conversion of nutrients into living tissues, constructive metabolism. The process of incorporating nutritive material into living tissue; the end stage of the nutrition process, after digestion and absorption.

Balance: A normal state of physiologic equilibrium. A state of mental or emotional equilibrium.

Biochemistry: The chemistry of living organisms and life processes.

Catabolism: The teardown phase of metabolism in which complex compounds like proteins break into simpler compounds (i.e. amino acids).

Catabolic: A complex metabolic process in which energy is liberated from nutrients for use in work, energy storage or heat production.

Catalyst: A substance that aids or speeds up a chemical reaction while remaining unchanged itself.

Cell: The fundamental unit of living tissue. Each cell consists of a nucleus, cytoplasm, and various organelles surrounded by a membrane. The specialized nature of body tissue reflects the specialized structure and function of its constituent cells.

Circadian Rhythm: A daily rhythmic activity cycle or pattern based on 24-hour intervals, especially the repetition of certain physical phenomena, as eating and sleeping.

Electrolyte Chemical: compounds such as sodium potassium and chloride that carry an electrical charge and are able to conduct an electric current in solution. Electrolytes differ in their concentrations in blood plasma, the fluid that fills the spaces between the cells (interstitial fluid) and in the fluid inside each cell. Electrolytes affect the movement of substances between these fluid compartments. Proper quantities and balance of principal electrolytes are essential to normal metabolism.

Electromagnetic: Pertaining to magnetism that is induced by an electric current.

Endogenous: Something growing or originating within the body or produced from internal causes. Some diseases may arise from endogenous (internal) sources.

Endotoxins: A toxin that is contained in the cell walls of some microorganisms. It is released when the bacteria die and is then broken down and eliminated by the body.

Enzyme: A protein produced by living cells that catalyze (causes to happen) chemical reactions in organic matter. Most enzymes are produced in minute quantities and catalyze reactions that take place within the cells. Digestive enzymes, however, are produced in large quantities and act outside the cells in the digestive tract.

Equilibrium: A state of balance or rest resulting from the equal action of opposing substances such as calcium and phosphorus or acid and alkaline in the body.

Equilibrium Reaction: Any of several responses that enable the body to recover and maintain balance.

Exogenous: Something originating outside the body or organ of the body or produced from external causes, such as bacterial or viral diseases.

Flora: Microorganisms that live on or within a body that compete with disease-producing microorganisms to provide a natural immunity against certain infections.

Gastrointestinal: Of or pertaining to the organs of the GI tract, from mouth to anus. The stomach and intestines where digestion, absorption and elimination take place in the body.

GI: Abbreviation for Gastrointestinal tract.

Health: A condition of physical, mental, and social well-being with the absence of disease or other abnormal condition.

Hematopoiesis: Normal formation and development of blood cells in the bone marrow.

Homeostasis: A relative constancy in the internal environment of the body naturally maintained by adaptive responses that promote healthy survival. Various sensing, feedback, and control mechanisms controlled by homeostasis are the heartbeat, blood cell formation, blood pressure, body temperature, electrolytic balance, respiration (breathing), and glandular secretions.

Hydrochloric Acid: A compound consisting of hydrogen and chlorine. Hydrochloric acid a very strong acid secreted by the stomach and is a major component of gastric juice.

HCL: Abbreviation for hydrochloric acid

Intrinsic: Denoting a natural or inherent part or quality originating from or situated within an organ, tissue or nutrient.

Ions: An atom or group of atoms that has acquired an electric charge through the gain or loss of an electron or electrons.

Leukocytes: A white blood cell used by the body to fight disease. There are five types of leukocytes; lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils, basophiles, eosinophils.

Leuktrienes: A class of biologically active compounds that occur naturally in leukocytes (white blood cells) that produce allergic and inflammatory reactions. They are thought to play a role in the development of allergic and autoimmune diseases, such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis.

Lipase: Any of several enzymes produced by the digestive organs which help breakdown fat and lipids during digestion.

Macromolecules: A very large molecule, such as a protein, consisting of many smaller units linked together.

Maladaption: Faulty biochemical adaptation to stress or change. Illness often provokes maladaptive reaction that increase the problems accompanying illness.

Metabolic: Metabolic change of or pertaining to metabolism.

Metabolism: The sum of all chemical processes that take place in living organisms resulting in growth, generation of energy, elimination of wastes and other body functions as they relate to the distribution of nutrients in the blood after digestion. Metabolism takes place in two steps: 1) catabolism, the teardown phase of metabolism in which complex compounds such as proteins break into simpler compounds (i.e. amino acids.) 2) anabolism, the constructive phase in which smaller molecules (such as amino acids) are built to larger molecules (such as proteins.) Structures such as hemaglobin or hormones.

NaCl: Sodium/Chloride, or common table salt.

Negative Feedback: that reduces the output of a system, as the action of heat Feedback on a thermostat to limit the output of the furnace.

Neurological: Of or pertaining to the nervous system, generally the Central Nervous System (CNS) and the brain.

Neuron: The basic nerve cell of the body. Neurons transmit electrical information from one body part to another. (e.g. the brain to the muscles to cause movement).

Organ: A structural part of a system of the body that is comprised of tissues that enable it to perform a particular function, such as the liver, spleen, eyes, etc.

Pancreatin: A concentration of pancreatic enzymes (produced by the pancreas) from swine or beef cattle. It is prescribed as an aid to digestion to replace internally produced lipase in some people.

pH: A term representing the relative acidity or alkalinity of a solution in which the value of 7.0 is neutral. Measured by Hydrogen ion concentration.

Physics: The science of matter and energy and the interaction between the two.

Physiology: The biological study of the functions of living organisms and their components.

Protease: An enzyme that helps breakdown (digest) proteins.

Proteins: A large group of naturally occurring complex compounds containing the elements of nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon, oxygen and occasionally sulfur, phosphorus, and other essential components of living cells. Protein is a major source of building material for muscles, enzymes, skin, hair, nails and the internal organs.

Rhythms: A constantly recurring sequence of events

Synergy/Synergism: The process in which two organs, substances, or agents work together to enhance the function of each.

Toxicity: The degree to which something is poisonous. A condition that results from exposure to a toxin or to toxic amounts of a substance that may not prove harmful in smaller amounts.

Definitions courtesy of:
Oxford American Dictionary
Mosby's Pocket Dictionary


Dr. Kelley on which foods and supplements are best for Parasympathetics vs Sympathetics:
http://www.drkelley.com/CANLIVER55.html
http://www.whale.to/cancer/k/Ch8.html

Parasympathetic dominant metabolizers most often need such nutritional support as: Vitamins E and B-12; Niacinamide, Pantothenic Acid, Choline, Inositol, Calcium, Phosphorus, Calcium Ascorbate, Bioflavonoid Complex, Zinc and Ribonucleic Acid. These metabolizers should eat at bedtime enough to carry them through the night. They should not eat leafy green vegetables or take large quantities of the B vitamins.

Metabolic Type Two (Parasympathetic Dominant)

Type Two metabolizers come the closest of all the types to being purely parasympathetic dominant people. One of the chief characteristics of Type Two metabolizers is that they burn carbohydrates very rapidly. Their pancreases work so well that carbohydrates and sugars burn or metabolize so rapidly that these people have a tendency to develop hypoglycemia — low blood sugar. When they eat only fruits, vegetables and sweets, their blood sugar rises and drops many times a day and their energy goes up and down like a yo-yo. When Type Two’s eat carbohydrates and sugars, which are metabolized so quickly, they become very weak and shaky after a spurt of energy.

Type Two metabolizers must have meat — preferably fatty, heavy, high purine meats such as lamb, beef, salmon, and sardines. They are usually the people who order their steaks very rare. By eating these fatty meats, they slow down their carbohydrate/sugar metabolisms. They feel they have eaten something that will "stick to their ribs." Their energy is released at a normal rate and they don’t suffer the ups and downs energy-wise that fruits and sweets cause them to have. Normally, these metabolizers don’t care much for sweets. They do well on root vegetables, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, carrot juice, and beans. They enjoy butter, cream, Danish pastries, cream puffs and foods with cream or butter added. They can do well by adding a small amount of whole grains.

Type Two people do very poorly on leafy green vegetables, candies, fruits, sweets, high carbohydrate diets and sugar pastries. They should limit the B vitamins and intake of potassium supplements. Type Two metabolizers usually have a genetic background from German, Scandinavian and Northern European ancestry.

Sympathetic Dominant:

General Nutritional Guidelines for Sympathetic Dominant Vegetarian Types (Group A)

Of this group, Metabolic Type Six’s require the most nutritional support, the greatest number and strength of vitamins, minerals, enzymes and other nutritional factors that help the vegetarian type. Type One’s require the second greatest nutritional support. Type One’s need the support that slows down the sympathetic nervous system and speeds up the parasympathetic nervous system. Type Four metabolizers need the least nutritional support of this vegetarian class — they are the closest of the three to becoming balanced type metabolizers.

For nutritional support, Sympathetic Dominant Metabolizers most often need: Vitamin D; Vitamin K; Ascorbic Acid; Biotin; Folic Acid; Vitamins B1, B2 and B6; PABA; Niacin; Potassium; Magnesium; Manganese; Zinc; Chromium; Hydrochloric Acid; Pancreatic Enzymes and Amino Acids. Each of the vegetarian Types (One, Four and Six) need these supplements, but each type needs different amounts and different ratios.

Metabolic Type One

Type One metabolizers come the closest of all the types to being purely sympathetic dominant people. One of the chief characteristics of Type One metabolizers is that they can burn carbohydrates slowly. Their bodies utilize the carbohydrates poorly and they are able to maintain their blood sugar level with very little fluctuation. If anything, their blood sugar level stays a little elevated. With this condition, they can eat mostly fruits and vegetables, maintaining their health and feeling well. These people are what are commonly called vegetarians. They very seldom if ever crave meats (except fish) and when they eat meat, they usually feel groggy and have a loss of energy. These people do not do well on lamb, venison, beef, sardines or salmon. They can do quite well on up to 100% of their diet raw. They should stress the following foods: whole grains including spaghetti, macaroni, breads, cereals; raw (unpasteurized) goats’ milk, eggs; white fish. They may use spices, 2-3 cups of coffee (non-instant), herbal tea, or an occasional alcoholic beverage or sweet dessert (made with unrefined sugar or raw, unheated honey). They enjoy and do well on nuts and seeds; rice; fruits and vegetables like apples, apricots, bananas, berries, grapes, oranges, pears, plums, grapefruit, asparagus, lima beans, beet tops, cucumbers, sprouts, lettuce, collards, dandelion greens, kale, mustard, turnip greens, spinach, and any leafy green vegetable.

Recap of The Ten Types of Metabolism

Vegetarian Types

Type 1 — Needs no animal products at all. Can live entirely on fruits, vegetables and nuts.

Type 4 — Needs some animal products such as fish, chicken, eggs and unpasteurized goat cheese several times a week.

Type 6 — Combination of Types 1 and 4, but has horrible metabolism. Needs more food to make up for lack of absorption.

Carnivore Types

Type 2 — Needs meat up to 14 ounces a day, preferably beef. Has little or no energy unless they eat meat.

Type 5 — Needs meat to feel good, but less often, perhaps 2-3 times a week.

Type 7 — A cross between Types 2 and 5 but with a horrible metabolism.

Balanced Types

Type 3 — Has horrible metabolism. Only absorbs 15% of what he or she eats. Feels so bad that they often wish they were dead.

Type 8 — Normal balanced metabolism. Can eat and benefit from all foods, provided they are wholesome.

Type 9 — Needs 70% cooked food in diet. Hates raw food.

Type 10 — Super-efficient metabolizer. Needs very little food and sleep, yet feels terrific.


Nutritional Individuality & Metabolic Typing

Dr Roger Williams was given morphine to control the pain and send him to sleep after an ulcer operation. It did relieve the pain but did not send him to sleep. In fact it made his mind active. So his doctor gave him a second, heavier dose. That would surely do the trick. The result was a mind that raced even faster. He had “a long night full of torture.”

This incident was put aside for many years, but eventually he went on to make a study of the differences between people. Astonishing anatomical differences that make for different characters and personalities. Differences in hormone and enzyme secretions, composition of body fluids, sleep requirements and patterns, reactions to temperature, alcohol consumption capacity, food selection and metabolism etc.

The Genetotrophic Principle
People’s nutritional requirements were also found to vary. Inadequate or unbalanced nutrition at the cellular level was deemed to be an important cause of poor health. He called this the genetotrophic principle.

“Every individual organism that has a distinctive genetic background has distinctive nutritional needs which must be met for optimal well-being.”

He suggested the metabolic peculiarities that predispose towards a particular health problem should be sought, and the metabolic weakness should be corrected through optimum nutrition for that individual.

Mainstream medicine largely ignored the biochemical individuality approach. But orthodontist William Donald Kelley was influenced by his work after his wife’s illness.

Given only weeks to live, he cured his own cancer with a vegetarian, wholefood diet, nutritional supplements and detoxification. He went on to treat many other people successfully with cancer and degenerative diseases.

Yet when his wife became very ill after being exposed to toxic paint fumes, the regimen which saved him actually worsened her condition. In a last desperate attempt to save her, he fed her beef broth. Her health rapidly recovered. This incident made him realise there was no universal diet. He devised a way to assess people’s unique dietary needs through metabolic typing.

The Autonomic Model
The clue to where he should look came from two other researchers, Francis Pottenger MD and Royal Lee DDS. They discovered that much of the answer lay in the autonomic nervous system (ANS) that controls bodily processes outside of conscious control. Divided into two parts, the sympathetic “fight or flight” branch which tends to speed up metabolism, and the parasympathetic “rest and digest” branch which tends to slow metabolism.

People may be neurologically influenced by one system more than the other, and they may differ in the degree to which they are influenced by the ANS as a whole. These inborn genetic/environmental influences can result in either sympathetic or parasympathetic dominance in an individual. This will give rise to different physical, behavioural and psychological tendencies.

For instance, the sympathetic dominant type will tend to be tall and thin with an angular face, tend towards high blood pressure and constipation, have a poor appetite, be highly motivated with excellent concentration.

The parasympathetic dominant type will be shorter and wider with a round face, tend towards low blood pressure and diarrhoea, have a big appetite, procrastinate and be lethargic.

These are just a small selection of differences. In fact there are hundreds of physical and behavioural differences and health problems associated with, or prone to each of the dominant types.

Dr Pottenger was the first to use calcium and potassium to influence both branches to guide the ANS into balance. Lee expanded the use of nutrients and defined a broader range of health problem linked to ANS imbalance. But it was Kelley who used the ANS as a means to determine people’s metabolic individuality.

After analysing thousands of people, Kelley believed they could be placed into 3 basic categories. The sympathetic dominant type requires a high carbohydrate, low protein, predominantly vegetarian diet to function optimally. The parasympathetic dominant type needs a high percentage of calories from fatty meat. The third category are balanced types who thrive on a wide variety of foods. These 3 basic types were divided into 10 subtypes, each with their own dietary and nutritional requirements.

Many people with serious health problems regained their health using Kelley’s protocols. However, he was unable to help everybody. Indeed, some people’s health deteriorated. Why was this?

The Oxidative Model
George Watson PhD ascribed mental and emotional disorders to metabolic problems. Over the years he was able to restore the health of several hundred patients who had exhausted psychotherapy and standard medical procedures. People with depression, mood swings, poor concentration and erratic behaviour. He solved their problems through diet and nutritional supplementation.

He developed his own metabolic typing system based on cellular oxidation. Foods are turned into energy in a sequence of steps in glycolysis and the Krebs cycle. Certain vitamins and minerals are required at each stage. A lack of these can result in less than optimal energy production and “a wide variety of mental and emotional disorders.” How a person functions psychologically depends on the rate of cellular oxidation.

Through many years of research, Watson found some people can be fast or slow oxidisers. Fast oxidisers do not burn sugar rapidly enough or in sufficient amounts in glycolysis. Slow oxidisers do the opposite. Since the normal functioning of the Krebs cycle - which produces most of the energy - depends on the efficient functioning of the glycolytic energy cycle, any problems with the latter will affect the rate of energy release and the amount of energy that can be formed.

Although genetics and environment affect cellular oxidation, it can be influenced by diet. By varying the proportion of carbohydrates to fat to protein; by varying the type of protein eaten; by giving specific vitamins and minerals depending on oxidative type, imbalances could be rectified.

The Dominance Factor
William Wolcott worked as Dr. Kelley’s clinical assistant. He came across Watson’s work in 1981. While it confirmed the importance of metabolic typing, it presented a problem. The oxidative model contradicted the ANS model! For instance, in the former, potassium has an acidifying effect. In the latter it alkalises. Wolcott discovered the answer to this seeming contradiction lay in which system, oxidative or ANS, was dominant in any particular individual. The dominance factor determines how foods or nutrients behave in the body, so it is essential to know which system is dominant.

This explained why some people on Kelley’s programme got worse. Once this new protocol was put into action many difficult cases could be resolved. “The results were swift and dramatic. Suddenly I began seeing real progress in those who had not previously responded to nutritional regimens based just on the Kelley autonomic model alone.”

“Together, the autonomic type and the oxidation rate determine the overall metabolic type and define the requirements of nutritional individuality. It is imperative for the practising nutritional therapist to accurately determine their interrelationships. It is only in so doing that the therapist will be rewarded with success. If the requirements of the nutritional individuality are correctly fulfilled, the results can be so astonishing as to appear to stem from the realm of magic. It is only then that the therapist can understand from his own experience that truly, food can be our medicine or our poison.”

Other Metabolic Influences
Although the ANS and oxidation rate are the most important metabolic variables, there are many others.

Anabolic and Catabolic Imbalance
Anabolic/catabolic balance, based on the research of the late Dr Revici, is concerned with the build up and breakdown of bodily tissues, the quality of energy production within each cell, and the permeability of cell membranes.

With anabolic imbalance there is an excess of sterols to fatty acids. The inflow of oxygen and nutrients and the outflow of wastes are compromised. This causes a shift towards anaerobic metabolism. In catabolic imbalance, the opposite applies with excess oxidation and resulting free radical generation.

Electrolyte Balance
Regulates circulation and osmotic pressure. Electrolyte balance is based on the research of Guy Schenker. Electrolyte excess can lead to clumping, making it difficult for fluids to circulate, putting stress on the cardiovascular system. Electrolyte deficiency can disrupt the endocrine and cardiovascular system.

Acid/Alkaline Balance
Changes in pH are usually due to their effect on homeostatic controls. Those who are too acid for instance tend to be sympathetic dominant fast oxidisers. pH is also influenced by anabolic/catabolic balance, electrolyte balance, respiration, endocrine functioning and to a lesser extent, food ash. There are also six other acid/alkaline imbalances that involve respiratory and renal function.

Prostaglandin Balance
These regulate inflammatory and immune responses. The main ones are series one, two and three. Each series can be influenced by diet, drugs, vitamins, minerals and omega 3 and 6 fatty acids.

Endocrine & Blood Type
Drs. Bieler and Abravanel found each gland can be stimulated by certain foods, and Drs. D’Adamo found that certain people are affected by blood type specific dietary lectins.

Metabolic Typing in Practice
The complexities of metabolism seem insurmountable. However, typing is not impossible. True, for someone with a serious chronic illness, a questionnaire covering over 3000 questions will have to be answered and a good deal of lab work carried out.

For others, answering 65 questions will give an idea of which general category a person is in. Wolcott says this has a “very high degree of accuracy” being a “remarkably advanced and powerful tool.” If clarification is required, he provides a means to fine tune the diet so the right macronutrient ratios can be identified. Details in his book or healthexcel.com

Harold Kristal DDS provides a Self-Test Kit allowing a number of tests to be carried out at home over a 3 hour period. The Kit contains a blood glucose meter and test strips, lancets, glucose and protein challenge powders, pH papers and questionnaire. A chart is filled out during the testing period and the results are faxed or posted off. A report is then sent back informing the user of their metabolic type.

If you would like to visit a therapist who has been trained to find out your metabolic type then please visit Metabolic Typing Therapist

References
Kristal, H J & Haig, N C The Nutrition Solution. North Atlantic Books, 2002 Website: www.bloodph.com
Valentine, V & C. Medicine’s Missing Link. Thorsons, 1987
Watson, George. Nutrition & Your Mind. Harper & Row 1972
Wiley, Rudolf A. BioBalance. Life Sciences Press 1989
Williams, Roger J. Biochemical Individuality. Wiley, 1956
______________ You are Extraordinary. Pyramid, 1967
Wolcott, W & Fahey F. The Metabolic Typing Diet. Broadway Books, 2000 Website: www.healthexcel.com

Also see: http://www.royalrife.com/hbal.html


A good website to see regarding metabolic typing, enzymes, supplements and lifestyle changes and their effect upon cancer is run by a colleague, Nick Gonzalez (http://www.dr-gonzalez.com/)

Along with other types of cancer, Nick (and the doctor he studied under, Dr. Kelley) has done a lot of work with pancreatic cancer. Dr. Kelley cured himself of pancreatic cancer and went on to live another 45 years, until he died of heart problems. (My pancreatic cancer information is included on the “Metabolic Type” and “Cancer & RawFoods” pages.)


Metabolic Typing Explanation and Diets by Walter Last:
http://www.health-science-spirit.com/contents.html
Other health related articles by Walter Last:
www.health-science-spirit.com/articlelist.html


Why You Are Different From Every Other Person On Earth
http://www.zedweb.co.uk/n16health/aboutus.html

There is much discussion about nutrition these days. So you should be aware of the importance of eating plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, low fat meat and oily fish, and avoiding processed, refined, adulterated foods.

For at least 95% of people this would be excellent advice. If it was followed the NHS wouldn't be in such a mess.

But you're reading this as an individual. I don't know you. Maybe you are among the 5% that has unusual dietary requirements. So I can't tell you as an individual what you should eat. Only you can know this!

Most books on nutrition assume everybody is the same. But it ain't so. We're all different.

Let me give you an example. Over the last decade or so we've all been told how bad fat is. Fat is blamed for everything. Heart disease. Cancer. Overweight. Rising petrol prices. You name it. Instead we should switch to carbohydrates - fruit, veg, grains etc. Well let me tell you about a diet some children are put on by doctors.

When Fat Is Good
90% of the calories on this diet come from fat. You read that right. 90%. What banana republic does this take place in? The UK. Have the doctors been struck off? No. It's medically approved for children. How overweight are these kids? Normal weight. Their cholesterol levels must be astronomical surely? No. A tad higher than usual but nothing to worry about. Give up? These kids have epilepsy. This diet controls their seizures.

You see the point I'm making? A typical meal of chicken, carrots, double cream and butter might turn your stomach. But to these kids and their families, it's just what the doctor ordered, so to speak.

You're still not convinced are you? You think that's a special case.

Surely we can make the general statement: fat is bad; fruits and vegetables are good?

Not really!

Some nutritionists believe our most common nutritional deficiency is .... fat!!!

Where Did I Come From? I mean where did your ancestors originate? This would be useful to know. It might tell you what you're best adapted to eat.

If it's from Eskimos, a high protein diet might be best. If it's from Japan, a low animal fat diet would be a good idea. And if it's from the East End of London, you're well adapted to eating pie, mash and jellied eels!

You Are Special - You Are Unique

Thanks to that great scientist Roger J Williams and his books Biochemical Individuality and You Are Extraordinary we know how our anatomical differences affect our personality, character and life. Here's some examples:

Normal stomachs vary enormously in shape and size. They may empty their contents rapidly or slowly.

Pepsin and hydrochloric acid, needed to break down protein, can vary a thousandfold. In fact a lot of normal, healthy people, have no stomach acid at all!

Some people have such a large oesophagus they've swallowed a whole set of false teeth (some people will do anything to get on You've Been Framed). Other people have difficulty swallowing a small tablet.

These kind of differences help explain the food choices we make, how much we eat, how frequently we eat, how rapidly or slowly we eat.

The weights of normal livers can vary fourfold. This may affect how well we convert nutrients into building material and energy (metabolism).

The weights of some endocrine (hormone producing) glands like the thyroid can vary sixfold. This will influence appetite, thirst and much else.

The blood supply to glands and organs also varies. This will affect their efficiency.

The Answer Could Be In Your Blood

In his book Biobalance Rudolf A Wiley gives some interesting examples of people's individual responses to foods.

For 15 years Ann had the following problems: chronic fatigue, poor attention span, frequent vaginal discharge, metallic taste in the mouth, poor memory, abdominal bloating, overweight.

All lab tests were normal. She was told there was nothing physically wrong with her!

Dr. Wiley recommended a diet which was the exact opposite of the "healthy" diet she'd been eating. She was told to eat sausage and eggs, well buttered toast, coffee with heavy cream for breakfast. Buttered, fried potatoes and beef for lunch. Liver, fried cauliflower and creamed spinach for dinner.

Although this diet looked dreadful and her friends thought she'd die, she felt so ill she was prepared to do anything.

Within a month she'd lost 15 pounds in weight and felt much better. Within 3 months she achieved her ideal weight for the first time in her adult life and all symptoms disappeared. Her blood fat levels and cholesterol remained normal.

Next he gives the example of Melissa who had a similar health profile to Ann, but she was put on a wholefood, near vegetarian diet, with lots of fruit and vegetables.

Yet after just one week on this diet, all her symptoms vanished. 3 years later she's still fine.

This was after 10 years of intensive psychotherapy!

You are no doubt wondering why two people with similar health problems were put on such different diets. The answer lies in the pH or level of alkinity of the blood. I'll discuss Dr. Wiley's system in a future article.

Peter J D'Adamo also believes the answer is in your blood. But it's not pH. In his book Eat Right 4 Your Type, he suggests you have no choice about what's best to eat (or what types of exercise you should do), because this is determined by your blood group. He gives 4 diets, 4 exercise programmes and 4 plans for healthy living according to whether you're an O,A,B or the very select AB. Your internal chemistry, the way you absorb nutrients and what foods your body handles well will be reflected in your blood type.

What Metabolic Type Are You?
After Dr. William D Kelley cured himself of cancer with a mainly vegetarian diet (and much else) he put his wife on a strictly vegetarian diet when she became ill. When she nearly died from his 'cure' he realised how individual our responses can be. He went on to develop a system called metabolic typing.

This looks at both the efficiency of your metabolism and the tendencies towards dominance within your autonomic nervous system.

After much research he came up with 10 metabolic types. Once you know what your type is, you know what foods you function best on. For instance type 1's would do best on a mainly raw vegetarian diet. Type 2's must have meat to function at their best; like fatty lamb and beef.

You need to answer an incredible 3,200 questions. Blood and urine analysis is also undertaken. If you survive this experience you'll discover your metabolic type.

Kelley devised this system decades ago. It has since been modified and updated (and simplified I hope).

Body Typing
Body Typing divides people into 25 types based on the idea that each person has a dominant gland or organ determined at birth.

Each body type has certain physical characteristics and psychological traits. And each has its own nutritional needs. By recognising which body type we are, we can eat according to the specific needs of our body.

Enzymes - Why You Must Preserve Them
According to Democritus, a Greek alchemist writing in 400B.C., all that exists are atoms and a void. So where does life come from? What turns lifeless atoms into living structures? The answer is enzymes. Within the vast chemical universe, enzymes build life. They take atoms and promote purposeful, deliberate, step by step reactions to create large sophisticated complex molecules.

Every chemical transformation that takes place within the living world is the responsibility of enzymes. They carry out each chemical reaction within cells, and as such, they represent the "life force" of the cell. This "life force" has not been synthesised in any laboratory. It is seen as a kind of radiation if viewed by Kirlian Photography. If the enzymes are weakened, in short supply or not able to properly function, the health of each cell would be in jeapody, and hence the life of the whole being.

Dr. Edward Howell - Enzyme Pioneer
According to Dr. Howell (1898-1988), that is precisely what happens to human beings. After a lifetime of research he concluded that we do become enzyme deficient, and this leads to degenerative disease.

Howell believed we are all born with an enzyme potential which has to last a lifetime. They need to be preserved and not carelessly wasted. The way to do this is to make sure the metabolic enzymes which run our bodies are not diverted to the task of digesting food.

Food enzymes are found in raw living foods, or foods that are only lightly heated below 119 degress fahrenheit.

But do these food enzymes really matter? Saliva is rich in the enzyme amylase. This starts the breakdown of carbohydrates. And the pancreas secretes enzymes to digest carbohydrates, protein and fat. Any foods to escape digestion are worked on by enzymes in the intestines.

If food enzymes are of any value they need to digest food even after they are eaten.

The Food Enzyme Stomach
According to Howell this is exactly what happens. The stomach is actually divided into 2 parts. Food goes firstly into the upper part of the stomach where no acid or enzymes are secreted. Here it sits for up to an hour while the enzymes in the food, which were activated by chewing, and enhanced by the heat and moisture in the stomach, go to work on digesting what was eaten. Only after this predigestion does it move into the lower portion of the stomach where the pancreatic enzymes continue the digestive process.

If cooked food is eaten, nothing much will happen in the upper part of the stomach apart from the continuous action of salivary enzymes.

This is confirmed by Gray's Anatomy, the Bible of medical students: "...the stomach consists of 2 parts physiologically distinct. The cardiac portion of the stomach is a food reservoir in which salivary digestion continues; the pyloric portion is the seat of active gastric digestion." Howell called this cardiac portion the food enzyme stomach.

Some animals, who have never got round to cooking their food, have special sections for predigestion. The cheek pouches of monkeys and rodents. The crop of many birds. The first stomach of whales, dolphins and porpoises. Some animals bury or cover their food, allowing the enzymes to go to work.
Many native cultures around the world let meat and fish hang around for several days before eating, or expose foods to fungal enzymes before eating them.

Most wild animals have no salivary enzymes, and their digestive juices are weaker than man's. But in an experiment with wild dogs fed a high carbohydrate heat-treated diet, they developed salivary enzymes within a week.

So perhaps food enzymes were designed to play an important role in digestion.

But even if this is true, why worry? Surely the body can supply all the enzymes it needs without relying on the enzymes in food.

Enzymes Do Wear Out
This is the orthodox view. Enzymes aren't used up, and even if they were, the body can make all it needs. Howell thought this was an "outrageous" view to take. Enzymes can be found in the sweat and urine after some illnesses, and after strenuous activity, which suggests they do get used up.

Just because the body is capable of doing something, doesn't mean it can always do so efficiently. This is particularly true with ageing.

The Human Pancreas Is Enlarged
As a percentage of body weight the human pancreas is much larger than other animals. It seems that on a heat-treated enzyme-deficient diet the pancreas is overworked and enlarged. An organ which is overworked eventually becomes exhausted. Can an organ which only weighs 3 ounces supply the vast needs of the digestive system on its own? If it can't, it will have to raid the body to supply its needs. Since the body's organs work as a team, an overworked pancreas could have an adverse effect on other glands and their hormones.

Less Calories - Longer Life
Undernutrition without malnutrition is a very well researched method of extending lifespan in animals and insects. It has been promoted by noted gerontologist Roy Walford. It is believed but not confirmed that this applies to humans. So long as the animals receive all the nourishment they need, calorie restriction allows them to live much longer than animals allowed to eat as much as they want. Restricted animals are also highly resistant to degenerative diseases.

But how does dietary restriction work to achieve these results? The answer to this is not known for sure but this is what Dr. Walford has to say: "Restricted animals are chemically younger that their chronological age would indicate...The amount of different enzymes in tissues...are in many instances characteristic of the age of the animal (my italics). Enzymes are of critical importance in metabolism because they regulate the rates at which most cellular events are happening...The level of [the enzyme] adenosine triphosphatase in the liver of a normally fed rat reaches peak value at 200 days then gradually declines with further age. In restricted rats, the peak and beginning of decline do not occur until 600-700 days."

The Fatal Process
This is the term Howell used for cooking. Whether boiling, frying or baking, the enzymes in foods are killed off. We could be shortening our lives by what we do in the kitchen!

Of course enzymes aren't just killed off in the kitchen but in the processing of foods. Howell's main focus of attack was on sugar which he called "the greatest scourge that has ever been visited on man in the name of food."

Raw Foods & Fasting
If Howell is correct in his view of an enzyme potential, then the use of raw foods, which preserves this potential, should be expected to overcome many health problems. This appears to be the case. In Europe in particular, where raw food therapies have a long tradition, highly nutritious raw food or mainly raw food diets have been used with success in many disease states. Therapeutic fasting preserves even more of the enzyme potential. This allows metabolic enzymes to go to work on rebuiling the body. This has also been applied with great success.

Howell did not advocate an all raw diet. He didn't think this would be palatable for many people. He suggested the use of digestive enzyme supplements with cooked foods.

Case Proven?
We can hardly say that! Howell's theory of an enzyme potential we're born with which has to last a lifetime remains a fascinating theory. I cannot say whether he's right.

However, I believe giving the digestive system vast amounts of work to do each day is a great drain on the body's resources and cannot be good for our long-term health and life expectancy.

I would suggest the following to ease the burden on the digestive system and indeed on the rest of the body which has to assimilate and detoxify what has been eaten:

Don't overeat. This is about the worst dietary offense you can commit. Aim to eat just enough to satisfy you and no more.

Increase raw fruit and vegetable consumption. Decrease cooked, refined and adulterated foods, especially high calorie sugary/fatty foods.

Avoid foods which you like but you know don't agree with your digestive system.
Look at the principles behind food combining, where concentrated starches and protein are separated. This eases the digestive burden.

Drink plenty of water. Ideally drink half a pint of water about half and hour before meals. Water is important in the digestive process and helps metabolic enzymes function more efficiently.

All the above measures will help to preserve enzymes, take the load off the digestive system and ease the burden on every cell in the body.


http://www.healthexcel.com/docs/_faq1.html
"Killing a cancer tumor  is not necessarily the same as  obtaining good health."

QUESTION: Cancer runs in my family. I am 25 and already have had some early warning signs of the disease. Isn't there something that nutrition can do to help me avoid the same fate as my relatives?

QUESTION: I just had a tumor removed from my colon. The doctors say that they got it all but are using chemotherapy to try to prevent a recurrence. I wonder if there's something I can do to help, too?

HEALTHEXCEL: Cancer, as well as all other degenerative conditions, occurs due to an imbalance in body chemistry and a subsequent weakening in the efficiency of function of the body's cells, organs, glands and systems.

Regardless of the therapy one chooses, balancing the body chemistry and improving the body's efficiency of function is the very least that a person must do in order to have any hope of restoring good health and well-being. In the case of cancer, methods may be used to kill the cancer . . . but, what about that which allowed the cancer to develop in the first place? What about the possibility of a recurrence?

The destruction of cancer is not necessarily the same as obtaining good health. Killing the cancer removes the symptom of a deeper problem; but it does not remove the cause of the cancer the failure of the body's own defense mechanisms.  



Interview with Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez
This article originally appeared in the February/March 1996 issue of the Townsend Letter for Doctors & Patients and is reprinted with permission of Robert Crayhon, M.S., and of the Townsend Letter for Doctors & Patients, 911 Tyler Street, Port Townsend, WA 98368-6541; (360) 385-6021: Fax (360) 385-0699; Email: tldp@olympus.net http://www.dr-gonzalez.com/crayhon_txt.htm

Nicholas Gonzalez, M.D., is a practicing physician in New York City who specializes in treating cancer with a treatment originated by Dr. Kelley, D.D.S. He has a unique perspective on nutrition, autonomic nervous system balance and biochemical individuality. He joined Robert Crayhon for the June 16, 1995 taping of the national TV show, "Alternative Medicine." His address: 36 East 36th Street, Suite 204, New York, N.Y. 10016. His office phone number is 212-213-3337.

RC: Dr. Gonzalez, how did you start approaching cancer from your unique comprehensive metabolic and nutritional approach?

NG: I was a second year medical student intending to become chief of medicine at Sloan Kettering, and a friend of mine introduced me to Dr. Kelley, the infamous dentist who developed this elaborate nutritional approach to cancer. Skeptically, I approached him, and he said, "All I ever wanted was someone from the orthodoxy to look through my records." At the time, my research advisor at Cornell, where I was a medical student suggested I do it as a summer project. It evolved into a five year research study. We went through ten thousand of Kelley's records, and found that this man had indeed reversed advanced metastatic cancer. We went through the cases of thousands of patients.

RC: The way Dr. Kelley started-- correct me if I’m wrong-- was when he found out he had pancreatic cancer he walked into a health food store and bought pancreatic enzymes. The whole thing began by chance.

NG: That's right. It was purely by chance. He had a lot of digestive problems, as patients with pancreatic cancer will. In an attempt to help his digestive problems, he started taking huge doses of pancreatic enzymes and immediately felt a change in his tumor. That's how it started.

RC: There are many facets to the therapy that you do, but pancreatic enzymes are-- you believe-- the most powerful anticancer substances available. Why are they so anti-cancer?

NG: It’s the way the body is designed. In orthodox and even unorthodox physiology, we tend to think that the enzymes serve one function: to help to digest food. Indeed they do that. But Kelley-- as did many researchers before him and since-- believed that the enzymes are a primary defense against cancer, and are far more important than the immune system in terms of controlling the development and growth of cancer. So we believe that is one of their designated functions in the human body.

RC: Critics of this will say, "Pancreatic enzymes released into the digestive tract are molecules way too big to get into the bloodstream."

NG: In the 1940s, scientists documented that they do in fact get absorbed. There is a wonderful study from 1976 in Science magazine, one of the ultimate scientific journals, where a professor at Cornell did a study with rabbits and mice and found that the pancreatic enzymes are absorbed through the intestinal tract, complete and active, and are not destroyed in the gut.

RC: Are there any studies on pancreatic enzymes' anti-cancer activity?

NG: Yes. There is a wonderful study from 1965 where a doctor used them in animal models and a doctor found they had an extraordinary, powerful anti-cancer effect.

RC: Now these are inexpensive substances, aren't they, compared to pharmaceuticals?

NG: Yes.

RC: Why hasn't there been a greater interest in pancreatic enzymes? I know they were studied for nearly a hundred years. Is it because they were overshadowed by the work of Madam Curie, and the belief her work generated that radiation would cure all cancer? Or is it because pancreatic enzymes are unpatentable?

NG: Because of FDA regulations, pancreatic enzymes fall in the category of a natural substance. Therefore, there is no impetus for a drug company to spend hundreds of millions of dollars in researching pancreatic enzymes. They cannot patent what they might find. There is also the psychological resistance to look at natural substances in the orthodox research community, although that is starting to change.

RC: I know that your practice is based on biochemical individuality, the belief that everyone has unique needs. Some of your cancer patients are not given that much pancreatic enzymes because their pancreas is strong and they do not need support in that area. You really examine each person to find out what their unique needs are.

NG: Correct. The doses vary quite widely, depending on the patient.

RC: Roger Williams and other researchers firmly established that we are all biochemically unique. Yet medicine fails to recognize this. Why do you think that is, and why do you think medicine is looking for the one therapy that will suit everyone?

NG: It is the limitations of human thinking. People want to reduce things to simple answers. Nutrition is not a simple answer. There is no simple way to approach even a single individual patient. Everybody is different. Everybody needs a different diet, different doses of supplements, different supplements. The same dose of one supplement will make one patient feel wonderful and make another patient feel very sick.

RC: Let's look at calcium. So many women are taking calcium because they are told that it is going to strengthen their bones. Yet you have said that the misuse of vitamin and mineral supplements are a real problem, and that people don't realize that the wrong nutrient for the wrong person can have profoundly adverse health effects. Why is that? Because of the individual responses to these nutrients?

NG: Yes. In certain patients, calcium can stimulate certain kinds of cancer, like breast cancer. If you look at the statistics epidemiologically, the increase in breast cancer parallels the increase in use of calcium.

RC: As well as the increase in toxins in our environment and the use of synthetic hormones. You also say that for some people, vitamin E is the wrong nutrient and should not be taken.

NG: We have been saying that for years. Everyone laughed at us. I have a lot of respect for the Shute brothers and other people who have researched vitamin E. Yet some free radicals serve a useful function. Too many antioxidants may knock out the beneficial role of free radicals in your body. Free radicals are how our body defends itself against infection. I have seen people on high doses of C and E who develop more infections, not less.

RC: The other point to underscore here is that you believe the reason that studies of nutrients come up with mixed results is not just because, say, vitamin E or C is good for some and fails to help others-- it is because it is good for some and bad for others, and that researchers are not looking for the bad effect, because they are not looking for the effect of nutrients on the autonomic nervous system. A large part of your understanding of the patient comes from looking at which particular portion of the nervous system is dominant, correct?

NG: That's right. The unconscious nervous system does many things in your body: it digests food, controls glandular function, and controls heart rate and body temperature, to name just a few of its actions. This unconscious system is divided into two halves that work in opposition, but together, in helping the body achieve homeostasis. The sympathetic nervous system stimulates the adrenals and thyroid, and inhibits others. The parasympathetic stimulates the liver, the pancreas, and digestive tract, and inhibits others. They work together, although they are in opposition. These are the two nervous systems that together control your day-to-day physiological functioning.

RC: How do you determine which part of the nervous system is dominant, and why is that important to your therapy?

NG: Because out of that we are able to determine which diet and supplements will suit the patient best. Their sympathetic or parasympathetic dominance tells me what kind of program they need.

RC: Let's say a person comes to you who is parasympathetic dominant, and you put them on the wrong diet, will you make things worse?

NG: You can kill them.

RC: Even if it is a vegetarian diet that is low in fat?

NG: Parasympathetic dominant people need red meat three times per day. Putting them on a vegetarian diet is like raising a lion on hay.

RC: Are there personality types associated with these different types of autonomic dominance?

NG: Sympathetic dominants are aggressive, type A businessmen that get up at six and get more done by noon than the rest of us do in the whole day. They are very ambitious, smart, and energetic in the morning. Parasympathetics would like to sleep until noon, and are very creative. Artistic ability tends to be in the parasympathetic side of the nervous system.

RC: Can people change from one side to another?

NG: We are seeing people who are the opposite of their genetic inheritance. Chemicals in the environment have knocked out their strong nervous system. Wrong diets have gummed up their works.

RC: We are told that everyone should go on a diet high in complex carbohydrates. T. Colin Campbell and others suggest this protects against various degenerative diseases. Is this some form of insanity, in light of the ample evidence that we are all biochemically unique?

NG: It is absolute insanity to suggest that the whole human species as different as it is could be put on one diet. The human species occupies every ecological niche from the arctic circle to equatorial rain forests and there are different foods available in these regions, and people have had to adjust. There is no way one diet is suitable for everybody. The Eskimos are one of the most famous meat eating peoples. They live in the Arctic circle. They have no growing season. They have no fruits. They have no vegetables. The only Eskimos that could survive are those that eat a high fat, high protein diet.

RC: The Eskimos are dying off. Don't they thrive on a diet of 80% saturated fat? Is an increase in carbohydrates in their diet killing them?

NG: Yes. And they were among the healthiest people in the world until they switched their diet to a Western one. When they cut their saturated fat consumption from 80% to 40%, they began to develop our pattern of degenerative diseases. For them, fat was the perfect fuel. There was a study that showed that Eskimos lacked the enzymes to digest complex carbohydrates. Zookeepers know that if you raise a lion or tiger on grains and beans it is going to die. Eskimos need red meat as well, to function effectively.

RC: And right now you are doing some controlled trials.

NG: That's right. We are doing controlled clinical trials with pancreatic cancer. Our hope is that once these studies are published and we document that this program can indeed work, the academic medical world will start putting money behind it. Then we can train other doctors to do it.

RC: You don't accept every patient that comes to your door. And it not simply a space or time limitation. Do you reject a patient if their immune system has been destroyed by conventional therapies?

NG: Most of the patients I see have had chemo or radiation. It is a question of amount and the type of cancer where it is being used.

RC: There are many books in health food stores which say that the underlying cause of disease is that we are all too acid, in large part because of a meat-based diet, and need to push our body towards a more alkaline state by eating more fruits, vegetables, almonds, millet, etc.

NG: That is absolutely incorrect. Sympathetic dominants tend to be more acid, parasympathetic dominants tend to be too alkaline, and balanced people tend to be somewhere in between. Sympathetic dominants do well on alkalinizing foods like fruits and vegetables. Parasympathetic dominants need acid forming foods, of which red meat is the most powerful.

RC: Dr. Kelley's wife got into trouble with a vegetarian diet, didn't she?

NG: After Kelley cured himself of cancer on a vegetarian diet, he assumed that it was the perfect diet and that the whole world should be on it. He put his wife on this diet to help with her allergies. Initially she did well. Then she began to do worse and worse; He began to make the diet more strictly vegetarian, eventually putting her on all raw fruits and vegetables with no protein at all. She ended up in a near coma. He was confronted with the fact that here he was the great nutrition doctor, and he almost killed his wife with the wrong diet. He was going to have to call an ambulance and put her in the hospital. He figured the only thing he hadn't done was put her on red meat. Initially she refused, but he convinced her. He put some meat in the blender, and fed it to her, and within an hour she was feeling better. She has been eating red meat two to three times per day since. That's almost twenty-five years ago. She has been in excellent health since.

Let's say that a patient comes to you with cancer & decides he does want to follow the Kelley Therapy. It's not easy, is it?

DR. GONZALEZ: No, as you know from your sister's experience, it requires real dedication. Attitude is the single most important determinant in a patient's recovery. This is a hard program, & you have to accept that getting well is a full time job. My average patient is trying to undo 30 - 50 years of damage, & it's not easy. It's virtually a full time job, but I do it myself. I've never had cancer, so I don't have to do everything my patients do, but I eat organic food, I do carrot juice, and I take supplements. I do it because it makes me feel so much better, & I like to feel good. But it is an investment. You have your good health, & there's no price you can put on that. Feeling good is the greatest gift I've ever had, next to knowing the Lord.

RC: Very few people are looking into the effect of macro- and micronutrients on the autonomic nervous system function. This may turn out to be, as you believe, one of the most important ways our diet and nutrient intake affects health. Dr. Gonzalez, thanks for being with us.

NG: My pleasure, Robert.
---

Cancer's Enema No. 1? Make That 2
By Kristen Philipkoski
http://www.sawilsons.com/cancersenema.htm

A study testing a controversial pancreatic cancer treatment that uses coffee enemas should by all rights be nearly complete.

But three years into it, Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez has only 25 of the 90 patients he needs to complete recruitment for the trial.

His clinical trial has been stalled by economics, logistics and outright prejudice against the twice-daily enema regimen, despite a promising pilot study.

"I'm the first person to say it: In the oncology world I'm a very controversial guy," Gonzalez said. "But we're trying to do very serious research."

Because pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly types, it doesn't take long for researchers to find out if one treatment extends life longer than another. In the pilot study, Gonzalez's treatment more than tripled the 5-1/2 month life expectancy of pancreatic cancer patients on standard treatment.

Still, because the program is unusual, oncologists have not been chomping at the bit to refer their patients to the Gonzalez trial, which is being carried out by the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Many seem troubled by the coffee enemas.

"I respect his willingness to have his regime studied," Barrie R. Cassileth, chief of integrative medicine at Sloan-Kettering, told the New Yorker last year. "But the coffee enemas are ludicrous. He ought to just get rid of them."

But Gonzalez said they are an integral part of the program. Caffeine stimulates certain nerves in the lower bowel, he said, that trigger a neurological reflex that makes the liver -- the body's main detoxification organ -- work more efficiently.

He says he follows the program himself as a preventive measure, works 14 hours a day and feels great.

"I thought (coffee enemas) were yucky when I first started doing them -- I had to get used to them," he said. "But I felt so much better from the first day that I never looked back."

Gonzalez began his latest study in 1999 with a $1.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health -- a coup for an alternative treatment. The NIH predicted he would sign up the patients he needed in three years, but it's taken Gonzalez much longer.

"In the United States it's hard for a therapy that represents not only a different paradigm clinically but a different paradigm economically," said Peter Chowka, an investigative journalist who has reported on alternative medicine for 25 years and served as a consultant for the NIH Office of Alternative Medicine.

Gonzalez's treatment includes two coffee enemas every day, plus about 150 supplements in pill form and a strict organic and vegetarian diet -- none of which are patentable and therefore are not potential blockbusters for drug companies.

You can't even buy the supplements used in the treatment at a health food store. Gonzalez has them specially made for the clinic.

"You're not going to go to the store and find 'Gonzalez Supplements' with my smiling face on them," he said.

It's not the kind of treatment most oncologists are accustomed to. But Gonzalez believes conventional pancreatic cancer treatment is much more unpleasant.

"When dealing with oncologists I always say, 'You give bone marrow transplants to patients, injecting toxic drugs and almost killing them,'" Gonzalez said. "Compared to that, coffee enemas are not that big a deal."

Another reason oncologists might prefer to send their pancreatic cancer patients elsewhere is that pharmaceutical companies often pay a "bounty" of around $8,000 per patient when doctors refer them to drug makers' trials.

"It's a very common practice, and the competition for subjects is fierce these days," said Arthur Caplan, director of the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Bioethics. Study volunteers are not always told about this potential conflict of interest, he added.

The rationale behind the bounty is that the oncologist loses a patient and should be compensated for lost income. But Gonzalez believes the practice skews trials.

"I don't think it should be that way, although it's perfectly legal and legitimate," Gonzalez said. "We're not doing that. This is a government study and government studies don't do that."

However, Jeffrey White, director of the Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine at the National Cancer Institute, said that financial incentives don't actually work very well: Less than 5 percent of cancer patients in the United States participate in clinical trials.

Surveys also show that about half of patients never hear about the trials. And when they do, only about half of those patients are willing to participate.

What really gets Gonzalez riled is that some researchers suggest the patients in his pilot study may have been healthier than those in other pancreatic cancer studies to start with, thereby skewing results. One National Cancer Institute website, for example, mentions this possibility.

"That's a pile of garbage," he said. "There's no such thing as a group of pancreatic cancer patients that lives a long time."

Outside labs performed the diagnoses and biopsies for the patients in Gonzalez's pilot study, he said. Of 11 patients, eight were in stage four, meaning the cancer had spread to other organs.

Such a diagnosis is almost always a death sentence. Only 4 percent of all pancreatic cancer patients live five years or longer, and more than 80 percent die in the first year.

Gonzalez was incredulous that anyone might believe he could handpick "healthier" cancer patients.

"I have this magical ability to find pancreatic cancer patients no one has ever been able to find? We can outsmart an entire pharmaceutical company in our puny little office with one other doctor?"

In the National Cancer Institute's largest study of 126 patients, none lived longer than 19 months. In Gonzalez's pilot study, two patients lived for four years and one for almost five. The median survival time was 17 months.

Although Gonzalez looked at just 11 patients, it was impossible to ignore the data.

Despite the promising evidence, some patients are not willing or able to comply with the demands of the therapy, which also requires that patients take some of the supplements in the middle of the night.

But at 78, Edmund Rubin of Sarasota, Florida, says he's happy to comply with the regimen. Rubin was diagnosed with liver cancer in 1990. He took an interferon drug for nine months, which caused constant flu-like symptoms. Despite the treatment, doctors found a second tumor behind his ear. Fifteen radiology treatments later, the tumor was still there and doctors gave him six months to live.

That's when he heard about Dr. Gonzalez's treatment.

"In six months I regained my weight and the second tumor completely disappeared," Rubin said. "I had a CAT scan and bone scan a year later and there were no signs of tumors."

Rubin has been in remission for 11 years and still faithfully adheres to the Gonzalez regimen. He calls it "labor intensive" -- he can spend up to six hours a day administering it. It costs him about $6,000 per year and, although it's not covered by insurance, he gets about $2,000 back from the IRS.

Gonzalez began developing his treatment at Memorial Sloan-Kettering School of Medicine in the early 1980s.

During this time, Gonzalez compiled data from an orthodontist who became famous for treating Steve McQueen's cancer with coffee enemas and nutritional therapies, William Donald Kelley. For five years, Gonzalez analyzed Kelley's data, and by the time Gonzalez finished his immunology internship, he had written a 300-page treatise on Kelley's therapy.

Gonzalez was called crazy and a fraud, but he says the data was compelling and that's what mattered. He opened his own practice in New York City in 1987.

Despite the criticism, Gonzalez has played by the book. He wanted the opportunity to test his treatment, and he's gotten it. But he may have to wait several more years for results.

"No matter what one thinks of his approach," Chowka said, "I think you have to give him credit for the way he's gone about trying to validate it -- by working closely with the NCI and the NIH and all that entails, and by adhering to the scientific method."

http://www.dr-gonzalez.com/totalhealth_11_06.htm
Our Approach to Cancer in General (Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez)

In my experience, most alternative practitioners who think about cancer recommend one diet for everyone, regardless of the tumor type, in a kind of “one size fits all” approach. Usually this proposed ideal turns out to be just another variation on the same vegetarian theme, with animal protein and animal fat demonized as the true enemy of all cancer patients and of life in general. However, as those familiar with our work know, Dr. Isaacs and I think quite differently, believing that each of us is unique not only in height, weight and shoe size, but also in terms of dietary and nutritional needs. We rely on not one but ten basic diets, ranging from the nearly purely vegetarian to mostly red meat, with the fat, throughout the day. My predecessor Dr. Kelley spent years of his professional life insisting that one size doesn’t fit all, that each of us is biochemically and nutritionally unique and each of us requires a diet designed for our specific metabolic needs.

Ironically, when dentist Dr. Kelley first began treating patients with other than dental disease in the late 1950s and early 1960s, he believed that for optimal health humans should eat vegetarian, period. However nice the theory might have sounded, in practice he discovered that vegetarianism worked only for occasional patients, and that many actually worsened eating this way. Through a process of trial and error, he learned that though some of his patients did well with a plant based diet, to his astonishment many did best when they ate red meat and only minimal vegetables and fruits, and some thrived when he prescribed a diet allowing a variety of both plant and animal based foods.

I recently said, when asked to say a few words in his memory after his death, that just about everything that could be said about anybody, good, bad and indifferent had been said about Dr. Kelley – with some justification. But if we put aside his controversial nature for a moment, if Kelley was nothing else, he was a man possessed of great curiosity. As he refined his therapy over the years, he began to think about the reasons why this should be – why some of his patients thrived eating plants while others blossomed eating meat, and still others did best when consuming all types of food. His intellectual journey led him on a long and winding path that eventually ended at the autonomic nervous system (ANS), the collection of nerves which regulates all aspects of our metabolism, such as digestion and blood flow, that do not require any conscious input. In a sense, autonomic means it works on its own, automatically, without any need for us to think much about what it might be doing at any given time.

Though the details of autonomic physiology and Kelley’s elaborate model are certainly beyond the score of this brief article, some general points deserve mentioning. The individual nerves of the ANS begin in the hypothalamus and brainstem, in an area neuroscientists call the “lower brain,” to contrast it to the “higher” brain centers of the cerebral cortex that help us think both grand and trivial thoughts, that allow us to ponder, do math, write music and fill out our income tax forms.

Signals from the autonomic centers travel out of the brain to reach every tissue and organ in the body, from tiny muscles of the hair follicles of our scalp, to the sweat glands of the feet, and just about everywhere else in between. Scientists divide the ANS into two distinct branches, the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS), each consisting of its own very unique set of nerves designed to carry out a particular set of instructions. The SNS and PNS tend to work in contrary ways, in opposition to each other, not to struggle and fight, but instead to allow very precise management of our every metabolic activity from second to second. When the SNS fires, for example, heart rate increases, as does the strength of each cardiac contraction: the small arterioles of the skin and those along the entire digestive tract constrict, while the vessels that feed into the muscles and into the brain dilate, to allow easier and stronger blood flow. As a result, blood pressure rises and blood itself gets preferentially shunted from the gut and skin to the muscles and brain. Furthermore, the sympathetic nerves inhibit virtually all digestive processes and processing, including the secretion of all the various digestive juices as well as peristalsis, the series of muscular contractions that propel food along the intestinal tract. At the same time, the SNS signals most endocrine organs, including the thyroid, the adrenals, and the gonads, to release their respective hormones.

The parasympathetic nerves, when firing, orchestrate the opposite chain of events; heart rate slows and cardiac contraction weakens, while the arterioles of the skin and digestive tract open wide. Blood pressure drops, and blood flows more strongly into the skin and into the various digestive organs. Meanwhile, digestive activity along the entire gut picks up, including the secretion of acid, enzymes and bile, as well as peristalsis. However, when the parasympathetic nerves gear up, endocrine activity slows considerably.

Scientists traditionally teach that the sympathetic system serves as our body’s first responder in times of stress, be it physical, emotional or psychological in origin. Hopefully my cursory description above gives clues why the SNS might help us survive through times of great or even minor difficulty. When challenged, whether physically or intellectually, it helps us if blood, with its oxygen and many life-supporting nutrients, flows steadily and effortlessly to the brain to allow for quick thinking. As blood moves more efficiently into our many skeletal muscles, we can, if necessary move rapidly and with great force – to our benefit should we need to run from a fire or extricate ourselves from a crashed car. We have all heard stories of heroic feats of human strength, such as a parent lifting the end of a car to help a trapped child escape; such actions are possible, when the sympathetic system is fully active.

The sudden burst of hormones from the thyroid and the adrenals helps convert our reserves of stored energy, the sugar in the liver and fatty acids sequestered in fat cells, into readily usable fuel. This too makes perfect sense, for under duress, we want our brain’s neurons and muscle cells supplied with as much energy as they might need, for as long as they need it. And at times when we are fighting for survival or struggling through a final exam, we don’t want our energy wasted on more the more mundane processes of life such as digestion. So it’s to our benefit that when the SNS fires during periods of stress, digestion essentially shuts down.

Though the SNS does deftly help us battle through major obstacles in life, such as a car accident, even more mundane events in a typical mundane day – an unpleasant phone call, a problem with the kids and their homework, a presentation at work – can send these nerves into high gear. We rely on our sympathetic responders from moment to moment, day in and day out, to deal with all our stresses and stressors.

In contrast, the parasympathetic nervous system helps us repair and rebuild from the wear and tear of life’s daily battles, whatever they may be, both major and minor. The PNS becomes active during and after a meal, to promote digestion, to expedite the absorption of nutrients and their efficient use in all the cells throughout our body. These nerves are also busy at night, while we sleep, directing the restoration of our depleted energy reserves as well as the repair of damage done to our cells and tissues each day as we move through life in a polluted, challenging world.

After years of thinking about the ANS, Kelley came to believe, as we do forty years later, that some are born with an overly developed sympathetic, and a correspondingly weak parasympathetic nervous system. In such folk, the organs normally stimulated by the sympathetic nerves, such as the heart and the skeletal muscles, along with the various endocrine glands, tend to be highly developed, even hyperactive, while those tissues normally prodded into action by the PNS – such as those of the digestive system – will be inherently weak, slow to act, inefficient.

On the other hand, others of us seem to be innately possessed of a hyperactive PNS, and a weak SNS. In these people, all the tissues and glands normally activated by the PNS – such as the organs of digestion – will be very efficient, while the heart, the skeletal muscles, and the various endocrine glands will be slow to respond, physiologically clumsy.

For those who fall in between with a balanced autonomic set of nerves, both the SNS and PNS can fire as needed with equal efficiency, and all the tissues, organs and glands each regulates will be equally developed and equally responsive.

Kelley wasn’t the first to propose that we humans could be divided into three autonomic groups, the sympathetic and parasympathetic “dominants,” as he called them, and the balanced metabolizers. The great research scientist Francis M. Pottenger, M.D., Sr. had suggested in the various editions of his classic text, Symptoms of Visceral Disease first published in 1919, that our species could be categorized in this way. More recently, during the 1940’s and 1950’s, the physiologist Dr. Ernst Gellhorn, a Professor at the University of Minnesota Medical School, documented the same, that humans fall into three general autonomic categories.

All this neurophysiology is more than of just theoretical interest: both Dr. Pottenger Senior and Dr. Gellhorn believed that much if not most disease occurs when the autonomic branches are not in balance, and health requires the equilibrium be restored. Though neither of these two researchers developed these thoughts to any great practical degree, Kelley took these pioneering ideas and outlined an entire system of disease and its treatment based on autonomic imbalance.

Though again, the details are beyond the scope of this article, Kelley specifically associated certain illness with sympathetic dominance, particularly digestive diseases such as ulcer disease, colitis, or irritable bowel. Such people can be predisposed to anxiety, but rarely suffer from depression, and rarely report allergies.

Parasympathetics, with their very efficient gut, escape most digestive problems, but are subject to allergies, asthma, chronic bronchitis, hypothyroidism, and chronic fatigue. They can, if the parasympathetic system becomes too overly domineering, end up in serious, life altering melancholic depressions.

And it was Kelley who first proposed that cancer occurs only in a state of autonomic imbalance, and that each of the two extreme groups, the sympathetic and parasympathetic dominants, fall victim to certain malignancies. The common solid tumors – the cancers of the breast, lung, colon, pancreas, liver, uterus, ovaries, prostate – Kelley believed forty years ago strike only sympathetic dominants, never parasympathetics. In contrast, the immunological malignancies – leukemia, lymphoma, myeloma – seem to inflict only those with a strong PNS, never sympathetic dominants.

Balanced folk, Kelley claimed and as we see in our experience today, tend to be the healthiest among us, generally immune to the diseases of the autonomic extremes including cancer. In my 19 years of practice, I have never seen a cancer patient whose autonomic branches, when first seen in my office, proved to be in balance.

Though Pottenger and Gellhorn broke important scientific ground, each in his own way, it was Kelley who first associated states of autonomic dominance with very specific dietary and nutritional needs. Kelley proposed that those with a strong SNS do best eating more vegetarian, dining primarily on plants. The parasympathetic dominants are the meat eaters, the carnivores, who thrive on animal protein and animal fat in all its forms - saturated, unsaturated and even cholesterol - while doing poorly on excessive amounts of fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds and grains. These are the patients that just can’t tolerate grains.

Balanced people, in between the two autonomic extremes, do well at a buffet (preferably organic of course) choosing and eating a variety of natural food types of both plant and animal origin, including fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, whole grains, eggs, dairy, fish, poultry, and red meat (though not nearly in the quantities needed by a typical parasympathetic dominant).

So, Kelley had come to associate each of the three autonomic groups with specific dietary needs and specific illnesses. But, inquisitive scientist that he was, Kelley took his evolving model of human biology to the next level, explaining why this should be the case, why each autonomic type seemed to require, for optimal health, a unique diet, so different from the optimal diets of the other two groups. Carefully, with the help of the scientific literature, he began to put the pieces of this complicated metabolic jigsaw puzzle together, a process we have continued ourselves to this day.

If we look first at the details of a vegetarian type diet, plant foods provide nutrients that neutralize metabolic acids, and ultimately push the blood and body fluids in an alkaline direction. In an alkaline environment, sympathetic activity slows dramatically, while parasympathetic firing strongly perks up. In addition, plant foods of various sorts, whether fruit or vegetable, provide certain minerals in large amounts such as magnesium and potassium, which together serve to slow down the sympathetics and rev up the parasympathetics. Such thoughts aren’t just from Kelley: academic physiologists have known for years that magnesium does block sympathetic activity, and potassium directly stimulates the PNS into action.

Certain B vitamins richly supplied in plant foods, such as thiamin, riboflavin and folic acid, stimulate the parasympathetics and block sympathetic firing. And nuts, seeds, grains and even leafy greens provide large amounts of linoleic acid, an essential omega 6, which similarly inhibits the sympathetics and turns on the parasympathetics. So, if we put all this information together, a vegetarian type diet, because of its alkalinizing effect, because of its specific nutritional profile, its collection of minerals, vitamins, and fatty acids, will tend to slow down sympathetic activity, turn on the parasympathetics and bring the out of balance autonomic system of a sympathetic dominant into, or at least toward, balance. As the autonomic branches move into equilibrium, the various tissues, organs and glands work more efficiently and appropriately, none too strong nor too weak. Health improves, and disease, whatever it may be, tends to regress.

Red meat contains large amounts of sulfates and phosphates which in the body quickly convert into sulfuric and phosphoric acid, both of which, like any metabolic acid, strongly stimulate the SNS. In addition, the four amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, aspartic and glutamic acid, which red meat provides in abundant quantities, one way or another do the same. Phenylalanine and tyrosine specifically serve as precursors to the neurotransmitter norepinephrine, without which the SNS can do nothing, and aspartic and glutamic acid each turn on the sympathetic centers of the hypothalamus. Certain B vitamins, like B12, found in red meat exert similar influences, activating the sympathetics, and blocking the PNS. The saturated fatty acids richly supplied in red meat, often seen as one of its detriments, also powerfully stimulate the sympathetic nerves. So for all these reasons – its acidifying effect, its amino acid, vitamin and fatty acid profile, red meat perfectly suits the needs of a parasympathetic dominant, acting to stimulate the weak SNS, toning down the overly strong PNS, and bringing the two autonomic branches – and the various tissues, organs, and glands - into more efficient equilibrium. With such balance, once again, health improves, disease tends to regress.

A diet providing both plant and animal products in roughly equal amounts yields nutrients that stimulate and suppress both autonomic branches. For a balanced metabolizer, born into sympathetic-parasympathetic equality, a variety of foods will help maintain their inherent physiologic status quo.

We, like Kelley before us, use not only diet, but also supplements, with the specific aim in each patient to move their SNS and PNS into harmony. In the alternative medical world, practitioners prescribe many supplements for many reasons, but in our office autonomic balance remains always the primary goal. For our vegetarian, sympathetic dominant patients, we generally recommend very large doses of magnesium, some potassium, but very little calcium, which we find stimulates the sympathetic nerves into action. For these people we also prescribe chromium and manganese, which have a similar parasympathetisizing effect. We also find useful the B vitamins, like thiamin, riboflavin and folate, which specifically suppress the sympathetic nerves and stimulate the PNS. We suggest these patients avoid certain Bs like B12, inositol and choline, which to the contrary stimulate sympathetic activity.

Our parasympathetics, in terms of supplements, usually do best with large amounts of calcium, but must avoid all but the smallest doses of magnesium and potassium, each of which would only serve to stimulate their already hyperactive PNS, and suppress their already weak SNS. We do include in their protocols extra zinc, which we believe to be a sympathetic stimulant, but keep to a minimum chromium and manganese. We also limit thiamin, riboflavin and folate, but often prescribe fairly large amounts of B12, choline and inositol, each of which serves to turn on their weak sympathetic nerves while suppressing the overly active parasympathetic system. We frequently suggest for them fairly large doses of the omega-3 fatty acids for their sympathetisizing effect, often from fish oil as the most suitable source, but restrict to a minimum the omega-6 class.

For our balanced patients, we prescribe a variety of supplemental nutrients in moderate doses that stimulate and suppress both autonomic branches, including magnesium, potassium, calcium, chromium, manganese and zinc, all the Bs, and a mixture of fatty acids, both the omega-3 and omega-6 varieties. In this way, their inherent autonomic balance stays steady, in place, moving neither into sympathetic nor parasympathetic extreme. We try to keep them exactly where they should be, in balance.

For our cancer patients, as with all our patients, we use diet and various nutrients, including the minerals, trace elements, vitamins and fatty acids to push their ANS into equilibrium. Though autonomic balancing remains a crucial goal for our cancer patients, as Kelley believed decades ago, and as we believe today, it is not in and of itself sufficient to beat the disease once it has become firmly established. All our cancer patients, regardless of their autonomic profile, must also take, in addition to their other supplements, large quantities of orally ingested pancreatic enzymes derived from the pig pancreas, for a direct anti-cancer effect. This enzyme product remains the mainstay of our cancer protocols, as it was for Kelley, based on the work of the brilliant Scottish scientist, Dr. John Beard. It was Beard who first suggested to the consternation of the medical world that pancreatic proteolytic enzymes represent the body’s main defense against cancer and would be the ideal treatment of the disease.

http://www.dr-gonzalez.com/totalhealth_1_07.htm
If we move from the general to the specific, in our experience all patients with pancreatic cancer fall into the sympathetic dominant category, and therefore, in our model, require a plant-based diet. Though for our practice we prescribe a variety of “vegetarian” diets depending on the patient’s particular inherent level of sympathetic activity (there is a continuum of both sympathetic and parasympathetic dominance), most pancreatic patients end up on what we call the “Moderate Vegetarian Diet.” This program emphasizes and allows all plant foods, including unlimited vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds and whole grains. We usually recommend at least a quart of freshly made vegetable juice a day, a good source of concentrated nutrients and enzymes in their raw, undamaged form. This particular diet does include animal protein in limited amounts, specifically eggs and organic whole milk yogurt daily, as well as lean fish such as sole twice a week but no more. We forbid entirely red meat and poultry, which would too strongly stimulate their already hyperactive SNS.

For all our patients, including those on the Moderate Vegetarian Metabolizer Diet, we always believe the cleaner the food the better, and believe that organic generally is best. We do not allow refined or junk food, such as white flour, white bread, white rice, white sugar in all its many incarnations, and synthetic or chemicalized food.

In terms of supplements, for those patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer (and other Sypmpathetics) we invariably recommend significant amounts of magnesium, up to 1000 mgs a day, some potassium, chromium and manganese, lots of the parasympathetisizing B’s such as thiamin, riboflavin and folate – but little of those nutrients such as calcium, zinc and B12 that would stimulate their already overactive SNS. We also recommend large numbers of our pancreatic enzyme product, taken in divided doses away from meals every few hours.

http://www.dr-gonzalez.com/clinical_pearls.htm
KH: Where did you come up with the idea at all to use pancreatic enzymes in cancer and what is the theoretic mechanism?

NJG: I didn’t come up with the idea to use pancreatic enzymes to treat cancer. The Scottish embryologist, John Beard, who worked at the University of Edinburgh at the turn of the century, first proposed in 1906 that pancreatic proteolytic enzymes, in addition to their well-known digestive function, represent the body’s main defense against cancer. He further proposed that pancreatic enzymes would most likely be useful as a cancer treatment. During the first two decades of this century, a number of physicians, both in Europe and in the United States, used injectable pancreatic enzymes to treat advanced human cancer, often times (depending on the quality of the product) with great success. I have collected a number of reports from that time in the major medical journals documenting tumor regression and long-term survival in patients treated with enzyme therapy. In my first article, I mentioned that in 1911, Dr. Beard published a monograph entitled The Enzyme Therapy of Cancer, which summarized his therapy and the supporting evidence.

After Dr. Beard's death in 1923, the enzyme therapy was largely forgotten. Periodically, alternative therapists have rediscovered Dr. Beard's work, and used pancreatic proteolytic enzymes as a treatment for cancer.

I began researching the use of oral pancreatic proteolytic enzyme therapy as a treatment for cancer after completion of my second year at Cornell University Medical College in 1981. My research advisor at the time supported and directed my early work, and later supported me during my formal immunology fellowship. In terms of the theoretical foundation, the exact mechanism of action has never been demonstrated. After Beard’s death, the enzyme therapy was largely forgotten and certainly never generated any significant research effort until recently with the funding of my work. There are several studies from the 1960s showing, in an animal model, that orally ingested pancreatic enzymes have an anti-cancer effect, and might work through immune modulation, but these studies were preliminary and were never followed-up. Dr. Beard believed enzymes had to be injected to prevent destruction by hydrochloric acid in the stomach. However, recent evidence demonstrates that orally ingested pancreatic proteolytic enzymes are acid stable, pass intact into the small intestine and are absorbed through the intestinal mucosa into the blood stream as part of an enteropancreatic recycling process.

It is clear from our extensive clinical experience that pancreatic proteolytic enzymes have a profound anti-neoplastic effect, but we do not know how they work. We have not had the resources to support basic science research, but with appropriate funding we do not believe it would difficult to set up animal models to explore the molecular action of the enzymes against cancer cells.

KH: Why did you choose a vegetable-based diet, low in red meat and poultry, with a little fish and occasional dairy products?

NJG: We divide patients into different metabolic categories, depending on each patient’s particular genetic, biochemical and physiological make-up. In this model, patients with solid epithelial tumors, such as tumors of the lung, pancreas, colon, prostate, uterus, etc. do best on a largely plant-based diet. Such patients have a metabolism that functions most efficiently with a specific combination of nutrients that are found in fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains and seeds, and with minimal to no animal protein.

On the other hand, patients with the blood or immune based malignancies such as leukemia, myeloma and lymphoma do best on a high-animal protein, high-fat diet. Such patients do extremely well with a diet based on animal products with minimal to moderate amounts of plant based foods, the particular design of the diet again depending on the individual patient’s metabolic make-up. We find patients with pancreatic cancer always do best with a largely plant-based diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and vegetable juice, nuts, seeds and whole grains. Allowed protein includes fish one to two times a week, one to two eggs daily and yogurt daily, but no other animal protein. In our therapy, we use diets specifically because of the effect of food on the autonomic nervous system. This system consists of the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches and ultimately controls all aspects of our physiology, including immune function, cardiovascular activity, endocrine function and the entire action of our digestive system. The sympathetic and parasympathetic systems have opposing actions on the target organs and so can adjust our physiology depending on needs and demands, enabling our bodies to react to any situation, condition or stress. We believe disease, whatever the form, occurs because there is an imbalance in autonomic function. For example, we find solid tumors, such as tumors of the breast, lung, pancreas, colon, uterus, ovaries, liver, etc. occur only in patients who have an overly strong sympathetic nervous system and a correspondingly weak, ineffective parasympathetic nervous system. We believe that blood-based cancers, such as leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma, only occur in patients that have an overly developed parasympathetic nervous system, and a correspondingly weak sympathetic nervous system. Previous research, such as Dr. Francis Pottenger’s research during the 1920s and 1930s proposed that much if not all disease has autonomic imbalance as at least one of the major causes.

We have found that specific nutrients and foods have specific, precise and predictable effects on the autonomic nervous system. For example, a vegetarian diet emphasizes fresh fruits and vegetables, particularly leafy greens, and contains large doses of minerals such as magnesium and potassium. It has been shown in many studies that magnesium suppresses sympathetic function, while potassium stimulates parasympathetic activity. Furthermore, a largely vegetarian diet tends to be very alkalinizing, and the neurophysiologic research documents that in an alkalinizing environment, sympathetic activity is reduced and parasympathetic activity increased. So, whatever other effect a vegetarian diet has, in terms of autonomic nervous system function, such a diet will reduce sympathetic activity and stimulate the parasympathetic system.

A meat diet is loaded with minerals such as phosphorous and zinc, which tend to have the opposite effect. A high-meat diet stimulates the sympathetic system and tones down parasympathetic activity. Furthermore, such a diet is loaded with sulfates and phosphates that in the body are quickly converted into free acid, that in turn stimulates the sympathetic nervous system while suppressing parasympathetic activity.

So, by the careful use of diet, we are able to effect major changes in autonomic function, and bring about balance in a dysfunctional nervous system. We find, further, as the autonomic system comes into greater harmony and balance, when the autonomic branches are equally strong, all systems – from the immune system to the cardiovascular system – work better regardless of the underlying problem. In essence, we are using diet to bring about greater physiological efficiency. For cancer patients, long experience has taught us that it is not enough to load patients with enzymes; the question of autonomic imbalance must also be addressed. In terms of pancreatic patients specifically, a plant-based diet provides all the nutrients to correct autonomic dysfunction.

KH: Can you describe the vitamin and mineral supplement regimen you used? Was it megadoses or a basic nutritional support?

NJG: All of our patients, whether they have cancer or some other problem, consume specific combinations of vitamins, minerals, trace elements, amino and fatty acids, and animal-derived glandular and organ concentrates. We use such supplements very specifically, in very precise doses and combinations as we use diet, to manipulate autonomic function and to bring about balance to an imbalanced system. Certain vitamins, minerals and trace elements, such as many of the B vitamins and, as mentioned above, magnesium and potassium, tone down the sympathetic nervous system and stimulate the parasympathetic nerves. Other nutrients, particularly calcium, phosphorous and zinc, stimulate the sympathetic system but weaken the parasympathetic system. By the use of precise combinations of vitamins, minerals and trace elements, along with diet, we are able to bring about balance to the autonomic system. And, again, when the autonomic branches come into balance, the patients, whatever the underlying disease, do better.

KH: What is the role of coffee enemas in this particular treatment and what is the history of coffee enemas in traditional medicine?

NJG: When I first began my research efforts, I was very surprised to find that the coffee enemas, often portrayed as one of the most bizarre aspects of alternative medicine, came right out of the Merck Manual, a revered compendium of orthodox treatments. When I was completing my immunology fellowship, I had an interesting correspondence with the then editor of the Merck Manual, who confirmed that the coffee enemas had been advocated in the Merck Manual from about 1890 right up until 1977, when they were removed more for space considerations than anything else. Most nursing texts for the better part of the century recommend coffee enemas. Particularly during the 1920s and 1930s coffee enemas were used in the US and abroad to treat a variety of conditions, and I have put together a library of articles from that time discussing the wide ranging effects on patients. Coffee enemas were frequently recommended because patients, whatever their underlying problem, tended to feel better after a coffee enema. I have followed thousands of patients over the years who have done coffee enemas in some cases for decades: virtually all patients report an increase sense of well being. I have done them myself daily since first learning about them in 1981.

There is research going back to the earlier part of the century that indicated that coffee enemas stimulate more efficient liver function and gallbladder emptying, and we believe that is the primary therapeutic benefit. Particularly with cancer patients, who often have a very large tumor burden, as the body repairs and rebuilds and as tumors break down, enormous amounts of toxic debris can be produced, much of which must be processed in the liver. The coffee enemas seem to enhance this processing of toxic metabolic waste. Interestingly enough, in Hospital Practice (August 15, 1999 page 128), a very orthodox journal of internal medicine, I read a summary of an article showing coffee seems to enhance gallbladder and liver function.

KH: Is it possible that the positive effects from the coffee enemas are a result of a "caffeine high" versus a metabolic benefit?

NJG: The issue of a caffeine high is often raised. I don’t believe this is the case at all. First, patients almost universally report a relaxing effect, not the stimulation you find with coffee taken orally. Many patients, in fact, fall asleep while doing the enemas. I, myself, have never been able to tolerate drinking coffee because coffee, when drunk, causes in me an amphetamine like response. However, I always feel relaxed when I do a coffee enema and often fall asleep. Something completely different is going on with the enemas.

KH: Can you describe your study and the basic results?

NJG: In July 1993, the then Associate Director for the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program at the National Cancer Institute, Dr. Michael Friedman, invited me to present selected cases from my own practice as part of an NCI effort to evaluate non-traditional cancer therapies. I prepared for presentation 25 cases with poor prognosis or terminal illness who had either enjoyed long-term survival or tumor regression while following my program. After the session, Dr. Friedman suggested we pursue a pilot study of our methods in 10 patients suffering inoperable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, with survival as the endpoint. Because the standard survival for the disease is so poor, an effect could be seen in a small number of patients in a short period of time.

Nestec (the Nestle Corporation) agreed to fund the trial, which began in January 1994. The study has been completed and was published in Nutrition and Cancer, June, 1999;33(2). Of 11 patients followed in the trial, eight of 11 suffered stage four disease. Nine of 11 (81%) lived one year, five of 11 lived two years (45%), and four of 11 lived three years (36%). Two are alive and well with no signs of disease, one at 3.5 years and one at 4.5 years. In comparison, in a recent trial of the newly-approved drug gemcitabine, of 126 patients with pancreatic cancer not a single patient lived longer than 19 months.

As a result of the pilot study, the National Cancer Institute approved $1.4 million over five years for a large scale, randomized clinical trial comparing my nutritional therapy against gemcitabine in the treatment of inoperable pancreatic cancer. This study has full FDA approval and is being conducted under the Department of Oncology and the Department of Surgical Oncology at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center in New York. The trial is the outgrowth of a Congressional hearing last summer encouraging intensive government evaluation of promising alternative cancer treatments, and is currently up and running. We are accruing patients right now for the study, and interested patients can learn more about this study and its objectives from Michelle Gabay, in the office of Dr. John Chabot, M.D., Chief of Surgical Oncology at Columbia, phone (212) 305-9468.

KH: Were there any side effects to this high dose (130 and 160 capsules per day) of pancreatic enzymes? It seems like that would cause some significant gastrointestinal irritation.

NJG: The only side effects I have noticed in 12 years of treating cancer patients with high dose porcine-based pancreatic enzyme therapy are intestinal gas, occasional bloating, and occasional indigestion. Frankly, the side effects tend to be very minimal. The enzymes we use are made specially for my patients in New Zealand. I believe most pancreatic enzymes available either as a prescription or over the counter in health food stores are not effective against cancer. We actually had to develop a manufacturing process to produce what I think are the appropriate enzymes, and they are not available except to my patients. Until we prove the benefit of my work, I don’t think it is appropriate to mass market the enzymes. I also don’t think it appropriate for cancer patients to try and treat themselves.

KH: How compliant were your patients to this regimen?

NJG: Pancreatic cancer patients are notoriously medically unstable, and some patients in the study were so weak they had difficulty complying fully at times, although many of the patients did comply well. Generally, we find that the better the compliance, the better the effect of the treatment. Patients in the trial came from all over the country, and because our approach is still alternative, patients were not allowed to continue the treatment when hospitalized. In the Columbia study, all patients are going to be treated aggressively for underlying medical problems and will be encouraged to continue their therapy at all times.


http://www.metabolictyping.info/docs/_00's1.html

This process is called Metabolic Typing. The purpose of this article is to convey the value of individualized programs in any approach to health, for we believe that true good health is far more than merely being free of any symptoms of disease. We believe that it is a state of optimum energy and vibrant well-being in a body that is functioning in maximum metabolic balance and efficiency.

Fighting Disease Vs. Building Health

The traditional approach to disease over the last 50 years in orthodox medicine has been the allopathic one &emdash; the symptom treatment approach. For a headache, your doctor might recommend an aspirin. When infected, you are given an antibiotic. When allergic, you are prescribed an antihistamine. When cancer is present, radiation, chemotherapy or surgery are employed to kill the tumor. In short, modern medicine is oriented toward fighting disease by attacking the symptom . But, this allopathic approach of fighting disease is only one side of the health care coin! There are many significant areas that unfortunately are inherently overlooked by this viewpoint.

As impressive as the arsenal of modern medicine is, as miraculous as the efforts of crisis medicine are, as amazing as the new discoveries of medical research continue to be, modern medicine is only successful in less than 20% of the ailments that afflict mankind. The other 80% which includes conditions such as cancer, diabetes, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, allergies and multiple sclerosis all fall under the category of degenerative conditions, and for all these dis - eases the allopathic approach of orthodox medicine can boast success at the rate of little to none.

Life in a state of health is a process of renewal, a continuum of rejuvenation and regeneration on a constant basis. When degenerative diseases develop which some say account for over 80% of all ailments that afflict humankind they are the result of the life-sustaining processes of REgeneration falling into processes of DEgeneration. They are an indication that the body is failing in its own metabolic (life-sustaining) activities. Therefore, in a degenerative disease, there is no outside invader for modern medicine to fight with its awe-inspiring arsenal of high technology and drugs. Suppressing a symptom through drugs, does nothing toward eliminating the cause(s) of degeneration and restoring the processes of regeneration and good health. Whether it be a headache, an infection, an allergy or a cancerous tumor, it is an indication of a more basic underlying cause: imbalance and inefficiency . You can take an antibiotic to fight an infection, but why did the infection develop at all? You can take an antihistamine to suppress the sneezing symptoms of an allergy, but why did the allergy develop at all? You can remove a tumor through surgery, but what caused the tumor to develop at all? . . . And, if it developed once, can't it develop again if its cause is not eliminated? From Healthexcel's viewpoint , diseases are more properly seen as symptoms or expressions of underlying imbalances . But, by exclusively focusing on the disease, by directing the awesome force of all that modern medical technology has to offer toward attacking the symptom, modern medicine tends to ignore the underlying cause. The process of finding right answers necessarily requires that right questions be asked. Unfortunately, in the allopathic, symptom treatment approach to modern medical care, the more fundamental questions concerning how to become healthy and how to stay healthy remain unaddressed . . . and unanswered:

What allowed my condition to develop in the first place?
How might I have prevented it from developing?
How can I regain my health?
How can I obtain optimum health?
Once regained, how can I keep my good health?
Orthodox medicine is traditionally concerned with fighting disease. On the other hand, the focus of The Healthexcel Programmes is on the time-tested technology of building health.

BUILDING HEALTH
In attempting to understand how to build health, it is useful to be clear on just what constitutes health and what constitutes disease. Disease both results from, and is a state of, biochemical IMbalance and metabolic INefficiency. Health, in contrast, is a state of, as well as the result of, biochemical balance and metabolic efficiency . . . on all levels: cellular, organ/glandular, and systemic.


The Metabolic Typing Diet
by William L. Wolcott
Doubleday, 1540 Broadway, New York, New York 10036 USA 2000, 428 pp, ISBN 0385496915
(This review is from: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0ISW/is_2001_Oct/ai_78900851)

The author explains why some people thrive on a vegetarian diet while others feel awful; and some people do well on a high-protein diet while others get sick on it. And some people can lower their cholesterol by reducing their intake of fat, while others find that their cholesterol level drops when they increase their fat intake. The answer to these puzzles is differences in metabolic type. In some people the sympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system is stronger, while in others the parasympathetic branch is stronger. The following table shows how the two branches affect different parts of the body.

------------------------Parasympathetic------------------------Sympathetic
Liver-------------------Stores glucose (lowers blood sugar)----Releases glucose (raises blood sugar)
Heart-------------------Decreases heart rate-------------------Increases heart rate
Stomach / Digestive ----Secretions Increase--------------------Secretions  Decrease
Intestinal Mobility ----Speeds up------------------------------Slows down
Pupils------------------Contract-------------------------------Dilate
Bladder Sphincter-------Relaxes--------------------------------Constricts

Sympathetic Dominance predispositions:
High blood pressure
Insomnia
High motivation
Infections
Poor digestion
Tendency to be tall, thin
Hyperactivity
Irritability

Parasympathetic dominance predispositions:
Low blood sugar
Irregular heartbeat
Allergies
Cold sores
Fast digestion
Shorter, wider build
Warm emotionally
Slow to anger

Besides the autonomic nervous system, there are other mechanisms involved in the control of body functions. These include the oxidative system (fast vs. slow oxidizer), catabolic/ anabolic balance, acid/alkaline balance, electrolyte balance, blood type, etc. The author feels that for determining what foods and supplements are best suited for a particular individual, the status of the autonomic nervous system is the most crucial, followed by that of the oxidative system. The author combines these categories and uses the terms Protein type and Carbohydrate type. He has prepared a questionnaire which helps to determine whether a person is a Protein type, a Carbohydrate type, or a Mixed type. The questionnaire consists of only 65 questions, whereas the ones used by testing organizations consist of hundreds of questions, Apparently the author believes that his 65 questions are the most relevant to determine basic metabolic categories.

Metabolic typing takes cognizance of the fact that each individual is different and has different nutritional requirements. Part of this is due to heredity. For example, Eskimos thrive on large quantities of fat and meat, while the natives on some Pacific islands thrive on an almost total vegetarian diet. Very few people in the United States are pure Sympathetic types or pure Parasympathetic types. However, by carefully answering the questions it becomes possible to determine whether one branch of the autonomic nervous system dominates.

Protein types will do best on a high-protein/high-fat diet. This would include meat (beef, organ meats, veal), fish (salmon, tuna, herring, sardines, anchovies), poultry, eggs, cheese, yogurt, nuts and seeds. Preferred vegetables are asparagus, celery, spinach, winter squash, carrots, cauliflower, peas, lentils, and artichokes. Other foods include avocados, olives, mayonnaise, nut butters and olive oil. Fruit and fruit juices should be restricted, especially citrus juice. Items to be avoided are alcohol, caffeine and sugar. Supplements which may be needed include calcium, phosphorus, choline, inositol, bioflavonoids, vitamins A, B5 and E. Most Protein types need to eat snacks between meals.

Carbohydrate types do best on a low-fat/low-protein (low-purine) diet. This would include some light meat (chicken breast, turkey breast, Cornish game hen), light fish (flounder, haddock, halibut, perch, scrod, sole, trout, white tuna), low-fat cheese, low-fat yogurt, low-fat cottage cheese, whole grains, brown rice, millet, buckwheat, most vegetables and all fruits. Nuts, nut butter, seeds, oils, butter, cream and other fats must be used sparingly. Since calcium intake should be minimized, the use of dairy products may need to be restricted. Supplements which may be needed include magnesium, zinc, potassium, chromium, manganese, vitamins B1, B2, B6, and folic acid.

Although blood type is not a primary aspect of metabolic typing, the author includes a list of foods that should be avoided, depending on a person's blood type. For example, Type A and Type AB should stay away from soybeans, and Type B and Type O from chocolate, People with digestive problems, irrespective of metabolic type, should avoid the following combinations:

* Proteins with starchy vegetables
* Milk with meat
* Two heavy proteins (like steak and lobster)
* Fruits with vegetables
* Starches with citrus fruit
* Fruits with flesh foods

Other useful information in the book includes the following:

* A discussion of the work of some of the pioneers in nutrition research which laid the groundwork for metabolic typing (Weston Price, DDS, Roger Williams, PhD, Frances Pottenger, MD, Royal Lee, DDS, Henry Bieler, MD, Melvin Page, DDS, William Kelley, DDS, etc.).

* A listing of the glycemic index for various foods.

* A listing of heavy metals; what they do to the body, and how to avoid them.

* Tips for obtaining foods that are pure and safe.

* Tips for buying non-organic produce.

* Tips for creating a safer environment (water, air, electromagnetic radiation).

* Identifying food sensitivities.

* A discussion of chiropractic, homeopathy and other alternative modalities.

* Parasite infections.

* Addresses and telephone numbers of organizations doing metabolic typing.


Metabolic Typing
http://www.mynht.com/metabolic.shtml

So many clients are confused about nutrition when they first come to visit us. Confused because they hear one thing about healthy diet from a huge university study on Monday, and then hear a counter-argument from an equally prestigious university study, days later. Drink red wine, don't drink red wine, vitamin C is good for you, vitamin C is not that good, a best selling book suggests a diet with lots of fats, another says no fats, the list goes on and on.

One thing is for sure however, each person is unique and responds differently to diet and supplementation guidelines than any one else.

This is why your sister may be on a nutritional plan that has helped restore health and vitality, but offers you no beneficial effects. This is why some people respond favorably to a particular supplement while you may just get stomach upset.

The answer to these contradictions lies in Metabolic Typing.

Metabolic Typing is a revolutionary system for optimizing whole body health. Diet and nutritional supplements are used to address the individual at a fundamental metabolic level. This is the fundamental way in which your body produces and processes energy.

For many years nutritional science has been based on a generic approach to health and nutrition. That is why there are so many diet "gurus" that espouse a single "one size fits all" diet solution, which is believed to be applicable to everyone. In fact, there is no such thing as "one" healthy diet. The Roman philosopher Lucretius spoke about this when he stated, "one man’s meat is another man’s poison."

The concept of metabolic typing is not new. What is a more recent discovery is a scientific understanding of how the body can go out of balance. It is this knowledge that is at the heart of a testing system designed to determine your nutritional fingerprint.

Some people utilize foods quickly and are called "fast oxidizers." Conversely, people who take a long time to utilize their foods are "slow oxidizers." People are then divided into several categories, depending whether they are acid, alkaline, or balanced blood types and whether they are fast, slow, or balanced oxidizers. A diet is then provided based on this information.

Say you are a "fast oxidizer." This means you need to be on a diet of foods that take longer to metabolize. This is why this type of individual thrives on a diet of predominantly meat and fats. They also need supplements that balance the pH. These include vitamin E, B-3, B-12, B-5, fish oils, zinc, iodine, and calcium. Since "fast oxidizers" usually have a high acidity levels in their blood, high doses of vitamin C, in the form of ascorbic acid, should be avoided.

A "slow oxidizer" needs to eat foods that are more quickly metabolized by the body. This diet includes more fruit and vegetables and less protein. As a "fast oxidizer" has a high acidity level in their blood, a "slow metabolizer" is an "alkaline blood type." These people can take vitamin C (as ascorbic acid) with all its benefits.

So far, we know of ten ways that the body's chemistry can go out of balance. The imbalances are divided into five pairs. These imbalances are very common, and most people have at least one of them. Correcting them usually results in noticeable improvements in health. Briefly, the five imbalances are:

Anaerobic/Dysaerobic - Assesses the efficiency of the conversion of oxygen to energy and the movement of nutrients into cells (cell permeability)

Glucogenic/Ketogenic - Assesses the ability to metabolize carbohydrates and fats into energy

Sympathetic/Parasympathetic – Regulates digestion, heart rate, energy, metabolism, breathing, circulation etc.

Acid/Alkaline - Determines any pure acid/alkaline imbalances other than the contributions of the other four imbalances to altered pH.

Electrolyte excess/Electrolyte insufficiency - Uncovers imbalances in the electrolytes sodium, potassium, chloride, and phosphorous.

In summary, standardized dietary approaches do not take into account that we are all different in how our bodies process food and utilize nutrients. Therefore, we have highly individualized nutritional requirements. Furthermore, it is important to understand that although you were born with a genetically determined set of dietary requirements, your body’s chemistry can change as a result of aging, stress, hormonal effects, medication and illness.


About Metabolic Typing

Metabolic Typing is a fusion of two system of metabolic analysis: the Oxidative (or energy generating) and the Autonomic (or energy regulating). The basic premise is that one or the other of these two systems (the Oxidative or the Autonomic) will be more dominant in controlling any given person's metabolism. Metabolic Typing seeks to identify: 1) which system is dominant in any given individual; and 2) which of two sub-types within that system characterizes the individual (Fast or Slow Oxidizer within the Oxidative system, and Sympathetic or Parasympathetic within the Autonomic system).

The reason that it is important to know the dominance system is that foods have opposite pH effects in members of the two dominance systems; e.g. foods that acidify the two Oxidizers (Fast or Slow Oxidizers) will typically alkalize the two Autonomics (Sympathetics or Parasympathetics), and vice versa. Acidifying the Oxidizers is desirable for the overly alkaline Slow Oxidizer, but contraindicated for the overly acid Fast Oxidizer. Conversely, alkalizing the Autonomics is desirable for the overly acid Sympathetic, but undesirable for the overly alkaline Parasympathetic.

The importance of determining Oxidative or Autonomic dominance is that most foods and supplements are processed differently in each system, producing a different net pH effect at the level of the blood. For example, fruits and vegetables are generally considered to be alkaline forming, and so indeed most of them are within the Autonomic system; but within the Oxidative system they have precisely the opposite effect, and are generally acid forming. Conversely, protein foods are generally considered to be acid forming, and while most of them are indeed acid forming within the Autonomic system, they are actually alkaline forming within the Oxidative system. Because one member of each dominance system (the Fast Oxidizer and the Sympathetic) already tends towards a relatively acid blood pH, feeding them foods that further acidify their blood would be counterproductive. Conversely, feeding alkaline forming foods to the two types that already run on the alkaline side (the Slow Oxidizer and the Parasympathetic) would also be counterproductive. But, given that foods that are acid forming in one dominance system are alkaline forming in the other system, we end up with two types with opposite blood pHs — one from each dominance system — sharing the same nutritional requirements.

Thus, what we refer to as the Group I diet — lower in protein and fat, and higher in complex carbohydrates — is shared by the overly alkaline Slow Oxidizer and the overly acidic Sympathetic. Because the same foods have opposite pH effects in members of the two dominance systems, the Group I foods acidify the overly alkaline Slow Oxidizer while alkalizing the overly acid Sympathetic, thereby helping to move both types towards a balance point, albeit from opposite directions. Similarly, the Group II diet — higher in protein and fat, and lower in complex carbohydrates — helps to alkalize the overly acidic Fast Oxidizer and acidify the overly alkaline Parasympathetic. Thus, from a Metabolic Typing perspective, the net pH effect of any given food is not fixed, as is usually assumed, but is determined to a large extent by the particular metabolism (or, more accurately, by which dominance system controls the metabolism) of the individual consuming it.

After identifying the correct dominance system and Metabolic Type, the Metabolic Typing practitioner uses dietary modification to optimize blood pH and balance the individual’s metabolism, thereby improving energy levels, stabilizing weight, and helping the body become more resistant to disease.


Eat for Your Metabolic Type, Not for Your Blood Type
by Harold J. Kristal, D.D.S. with Jessica A. Lewis

In recent Townsend Letter articles, I have outlined the benefits of eating a diet keyed to metabolic type. No one diet is ideal for everyone. What is healthful for one person may be inadequate or even harmful for another. When we recommend foods and supplements, it is crucial to address the patient's individual biochemistry. By testing thoroughly to determine each client's metabolic type, my associates and I are able to determine which foods and supplements will be beneficial for that person, and which will be useless or worse.

To properly explain the usefulness of metabolic typing, I must briefly discuss the crucial role of blood pH. The ideal venous pH is 7.461. At this level, the body most efficiently absorbs and utilizes nutrients. A higher or lower pH means the blood is too alkaline or too acid for optimal functioning. Mal absorption and poor utilization of nutrients can lead to an extremely broad array of symptoms, from fatigue and allergies to overweight and high blood pressure. The further the blood deviates from its ideal pH level, the more severe the symptoms become. When the blood moves to its ideal pH level, the body comes into balance and these symptoms generally abate or disappear altogether. The key to managing the blood pH lies in knowing the individual's metabolic type.

There are five basic metabolic types. Two of these tend to be too acid, and need foods that will help move their blood pH towards the alkaline. Two tend to be too alkaline, and need foods to make them more acid. One type tends to be fairly close to the center, yet may need fine-tuning to move to the ideal level. Why not simply determine the patient's blood pH and prescribe foods accordingly? Because even if we know, for example, that the blood is too acid, we still don't know which foods will make it more alkaline. The somewhat surprising reason for this is that any given food may be either alkalinizing or acidifying, depending on the metabolic type of the person ingesting it. Before we can be certain which foods (and supplements) a patient needs, we must know his or her metabolic type.

Recently, there has been a great deal of excitement about another way to eat for your type: eating for your blood type, as described in the work of Peter d'Adamo (see Additional Information at the end of the article: 2) This system is very appealing, at least in part because it is so easy to use: once you know your blood type, you simply follow the diet for that type outlined in d'Adamo's book. According to d'Adamo's interesting theory, the various human blood types evolved over time, and each corresponds to a phase of human development, and therefore to the dietary patterns of that period. The first blood type to evolve was type O, which was the blood type of early nomadic humans, hunter-gatherers whose diet included as much meat as they could catch. Then, about fifteen thousand years ago, certain humans learned to grow crops. They settled, became agrarian, and shifted to a more vegetarian, grain-based diet. These peoples evolved blood type A. Further evolution and mingling produced the other two types, B and AB. According to the theory, people with blood type O will function best by eating a lot of meat, while blood type A's will be healthiest when eating a mainly vegetarian diet, and so on. This makes a great deal of sense. The trouble is, it doesn't work.

In my practice I see many type O's who thrive on a meat-based diet. But I also see many type O's who have become unwell on such a diet, and actually need a mainly vegetarian diet in order to feel their best. Conversely, I often see type A's who need to eat a lot of fat and meat to achieve optimal health. Other researchers and practitioners report the same experience: blood type is an unreliable indicator of dietary needs. Robert Crahon, a renowned nutritionist in Boulder, Colorado, has concluded that you cannot simply eat for your blood type. Bill Wolcott of Winthrop, Washington, who has created the Healthexcel program, states that you cannot rely on blood type to determine your most healthful diet and supplements. Dr. Guy Schenker, a chiropractor who runs the Nutri-Spec Company, is a renowned writer and publishes a monthly newsletter. He too is convinced that "eat for your blood type" is an erroneous prescription. The successes are balanced by too many failures. To be useful, the theory must produce consistent results.

Why does eating for blood type work for some and fail utterly for others? It is impossible to know for certain, but I conjecture that the type O of today is very different from the type O of sixty thousand years ago. At that time, presumably, all humans were type O, and all had evolved to utilize the hunter-gatherer diet. Then one population group split off, adapted to an agrarian diet, and developed type A blood. At this point, each population group was homogeneous, and blood type was probably a reliable indicator of dietary needs. Since that time, I would suggest, human population groups have mingled, creating a very mixed gene pool. Each individual still has one of the four major blood types, but may have characteristics of all four types, passed on with the genes of parents and grandparents. Therefore, the individual physiology may contain elements found in various blood types, in unique combination. One Type O could have a very different metabolism, and dietary profile, from another. Though it is pure conjecture, this is one theory that could help to explain the inconsistency of results from "eating for your blood type."

Eating for your metabolic type is not quite so easy to use - it requires a series of tests to determine type - but the consistent results make it worth the extra trouble. In order to efficiently determine each patient's metabolic type, Bill Wolcott and I have developed a series of tests which can be completed in one office visit. Before the visit, the client is asked to complete a questionnaire which includes both physical and psychological characteristics which are linked to metabolic type. In the office, we take physiological readings, including blood glucose level, pulse, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and several others. In addition, we ask for the patient's subjective experience of well being, energy level, hunger, etc. We then give the patient a high glucose drink. We do this in order to challenge the system, and measure its reactions. We repeat the physiological tests and the subjective questions at specific intervals over the course of the visit. The entire process takes about two hours, and the results, combined with our extensive research data, allow us to determine each patient's metabolic type, with 80% accuracy on the first visit. Further testing, including a protein challenge I have recently developed, helps us to classify the 20% of patients who yield ambiguous results from the standard series of tests (see Additional Information at the end of the article).

In order to make the benefits of metabolic typing more widely available, my colleagues and I have developed a two part program for teaching medical and nutritional professionals how to use the system. In the Level One seminar, we outline the entire program, including hands-on practice at performing the tests and interpreting the results. This two-day seminar prepares the participants to begin using metabolic typing with their own patients. Consultation by telephone is available and generally necessary at this stage, until each participant becomes thoroughly proficient at using the system. To this end, we highly recommend that participants follow up by taking the Level Two seminar. In Level Two, we cover in depth the use of supplements as well as foods to resolve imbalances in the system. This information is fairly intricate, as well as extremely useful. In addition, we go through more complicated case studies, adding further details and refinements that cannot be covered in the basic program.

These seminars are given quite frequently. For more information, please contact my office:

Harold J. Kristal, DDS

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

Watson, Dr. George. Nutrition and Your Mind New York: Harper and Row, 1972. Wiley, Dr. Rudolf. Biobalance. Tacoma, WA: Lifesciences Press, 1991.

D'Adamo, Peter J., Catherine Whitney. Eat Right 4 Your Blood Type: Staying Healthy, Living Longer, Achieving Your Ideal Weight New York, N.Y.: Putnam Publishing Group, 1997

The protein challenge, as well as the glucose challenge, will be described in greater detail in a future article.
---

Diabetes, Cancer and Weight: A Metabolic Typing Survey
by Harold J. Kristal, D.D.S. with James M. Haig, N.C.

Our work with Metabolic Typing puts us in a unique position to observe relationships between particular disease conditions and the different Metabolic Types. A Metabolic Type can be understood as the characteristic way in which an individual produces and processes energy. By addressing the individual at this fundamental level, we are able to match up their metabolism with an appropriate diet that will help to protect the body from the development of the common degenerative diseases. This approach is in line with, and a contemporary restatement of, the traditional naturopathic orientation to healthcare, where the individual as a whole is addressed, rather than just their specific disease condition. The survey that is presented below shows a direct correlation between diabetes and cancer and specific Metabolic Types in our own patient population. It reinforces the concept that different dietary approaches are needed for individuals to regain or maintain optimal health, and provides important pointers as to how to use dietary intervention to prevent such diseases from occurring in the first place. Before we look at the details and implications of our patient survey, we will first set the stage with a general overview of the principles underlying Metabolic Typing.

Metabolic Typing: An Overview

In 1987, I was introduced to a little known nutritional protocol that addresses the individual at the foundational metabolic level, rather than directly addressing any particular disease condition. The basic thesis of this Oxidative system approach to metabolic balancing is that imbalances which sooner or later manifest as outright diseases originate when our blood pH deviates too far from the ideal of 7.46. It was George Watson, Ph.D., a full professor at the University of Southern California and author of the classic book Nutrition and Your Mind: The Psychochemical Response, who first introduced this theory to the world. Watson’s typing methodology, later refined by Rudolf Wiley, Ph.D., was based on the functioning of the Oxidative system, the complex of processes that generate energy at an intracellular level. Within this system, individuals are typed according to the speed at which they convert nutrients into energy, in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate). The creation of optimal energy through optimal blood pH is the path I have followed from 1987 to this day.

In 1996, nutritionist William Wolcott introduced me to another metabolic balancing protocol, based on the autonomic nervous system (ANS). This Autonomic system, rooted in the early research of Francis M. Pottenger, M.D., and further developed by William Donald Kelley, D.D.S., relies on a different metabolic pathway than the Oxidative system. It looks to the relative dominance of the two divisions of the ANS (sympathetic and parasympathetic) as the primary barometers of metabolic balance. The main contribution of Wolcott himself, who had worked for many years directly with Dr. Kelley, was the realization that either one or the other of these two dominance systems — as Wolcott termed the Oxidative and Autonomic systems — is the primary factor controlling each individual’s metabolism. This syncretistic approach, incorporating both dominance systems, is what we now refer to as Metabolic Typing (see Figure I).

Figure I: Metabolic Dominance Systems

Oxidative System ----------------------- Autonomic System

Slow Oxidizer (alkaline) --------------- Sympathetic (acid)                 

Fast Oxidizer (acid) ------------------- Parasympathetic (alkaline)

The singular importance of determining oxidative or autonomic dominance is that most foods and supplements are processed differently in each system, producing a different pH effect at the level of the blood. For example, fruits and vegetables are generally considered to be alkaline forming, and so indeed most of them are within the Autonomic system; but within the Oxidative system they have precisely the opposite effect, and are actually acid forming. Conversely, protein foods are generally considered to be acid forming, and while most of them are indeed acid forming within the Autonomic system, they are actually alkaline forming within the Oxidative system. Because one of the two members of both dominance systems (the Fast Oxidizer and the Sympathetic) already runs on the acid side at the level of the blood pH, feeding them foods that further acidify their blood would be counterproductive. Conversely, feeding alkaline forming foods to the two types that already run on the alkaline side (the Slow Oxidizer and the Parasympathetic) would also be counterproductive. But, given that what is acid forming in one dominance system is alkaline forming in the other system, we end up with two types with opposite blood pHs — one from each dominance system — sharing the nutritional requirements.

Thus, what we refer to as the Group I diet — lower in protein and fat, and higher in complex carbohydrates — is shared by the overly alkaline Slow Oxidizer and the overly acidic Sympathetic. Because the same foods have opposite pH effects in members of the two dominance systems, the Group I foods acidify the overly alkaline Slow Oxidizer while alkalizing the overly acid Sympathetic, thereby helping to move both types towards a balance point, albeit from opposite directions. Similarly, the Group II diet — higher in protein and fat, and lower in complex carbohydrates — helps to alkalize the overly acidic Fast Oxidizer and acidify the overly alkaline Parasympathetic. Thus, from a Metabolic Typing perspective, the pH effect of any given food is not fixed, as is usually assumed, but is determined to a large extent by the particular metabolism (or, more accurately, by which dominance system controls the metabolism) of the individual consuming it (see Figure II).

Figure II: Group I and Group II Diets

Group I ------------------------- Group II
Slow Oxidizer (alkaline) -------- Fast Oxidizer (acid)
Sympathetic (acid) -------------- Parasympathetic (alkaline)
Lower in protein and fat -------- Higher in protein and fat
Higher in complex carbs --------- Lower in complex carbs

Group I foods acidify the overly alkaline Slow Oxidizer, but alkalize the overly acid Sympathetic

Group II foods alkalize the overly acidic Fast Oxidizer, but acidify the overly alkaline

Parasympathetic

By identifying the correct dominance system and Metabolic Type, our objective is to use dietary modification to optimize blood pH and thereby balance the individual’s metabolism.

This brief introduction to the principles of Metabolic Typing is intended to provide a context for the results of a patient survey that we recently conducted at our Metabolic Nutrition clinic in San Rafael, California. I began working with the Oxidative system of Metabolic Typing in 1987, and since then have typed over 6,000 individuals. In 1996 I switched to the integrated form of Metabolic Typing (incorporating the Autonomic system along with the Oxidative), and have worked to refine our methodology over the ensuing years. The data in the survey I will be discussing are drawn from approximately 1,450 patients typed since the year 2000. At this point, I feel that our typing protocol has approximately a 90% accuracy rate.

Diabetes, Cancer and Excess Weight Survey

Sometime in 1997 I started to notice a pattern emerging among our patient population: most of those with Type II diabetes were the Group II Metabolic Types (Fast Oxidizers or Parasympathetics) while most of those with cancer were Group I Metabolic Types (Slow Oxidizers or Sympathetics). After informally saying for several years that each of these figures was around 80%, I decided to instruct my staff to analyze our recent patient files and determine the exact numbers. We also tallied the percentages of individuals coming to our clinic with weight problems. The results (which are shown below, in Figure III) more or less confirmed my original suspicions.

Figure III: Diabetes, Cancer and Excess Weight Survey

Based on an analysis of approximately 1,450 patient files

Diet Groups and ----- Diabetes ---- Cancer --- Overweight
Metabolic Types -----(Type II)

Group I

Slow Oxidizers -------- 16%---------- 35%--------- 15%
Sympathetics ---------- 12% --------- 43%--------- 25%
Group I Totals -------- 28% --------- 78%--------- 40%

Group II

Fast Oxidizers -------- 50%---------- 19%--------- 47%
Parasympathetics ------ 22% ---------- 3% -------- 13%
Group II Totals ------- 72% --------- 22% -------- 60%

Because we are practicing nutrition, not medicine, it is important to stress that we neither diagnose nor treat diseases in our clinic. The above individuals had already been medically diagnosed with either cancer or diabetes, whereas excess weight was defined as 10lbs or greater above the individual’s target weight. What we do offer is nutritional guidance tailored primarily to the individual’s Metabolic Type, and secondarily to their particular health condition.

My estimate of 80% of diabetics being Group II Metabolic Types was not too far off. The survey shows that the actual number is 72%. Of these, the majority (50%) are Fast Oxidizers. At first glance this may seem counterintuitive, because Fast Oxidizers, by definition, metabolize carbohydrates rapidly (leading to their relatively acid blood pH). Fast Oxidizers typically have an aggressive insulin response, which efficiently “unlocks” the insulin receptors on the cell membrane to allow glucose to be taken inside the cell to be oxidized for energy. However, if you combine an accelerated metabolism of carbohydrates with the excessive long-term intake of refined carbohydrates that typifies the standard American diet, you have the perfect set-up for insulin resistance. Large amounts of insulin produced over an extended period of time will lead to a “blunting”, or reduction of the sensitivity of the insulin receptors, increasingly reducing their efficiency, a process analogous to the way in which we can learn to “tune out” an annoying sustained sound. As we now know, based largely on the groundbreaking work of Professor Gerald Reaven, insulin resistance is the primary predisposing factor for Type II diabetes.

The Group II diet, which is recommended to the Group II Metabolic Types (Fast Oxidizers and Parasympathetics), is a higher protein and fat, and lower carbohydrate diet. However, for diabetics we have created an even lower carbohydrate version of this diet, which we refer to as the Diabetic Protocol (this is described in some detail in our book, The Nutrition Solution: A Guide to Your Metabolic Type, and explored in our monthly seminars for health professionals). For the 28% of our diabetic clients who are Group I Metabolic Types (Slow Oxidizers and Sympathetics), we diverge from our usual Group I diet plan (which is a higher carbohydrate diet), and recommend that they also adopt the Diabetic Protocol. The reason for this is simply that blood sugars that are radically outside of the normal range must be stabilized before we can even consider putting an individual on the higher carbohydrate Group I diet plan.

My estimate of our cancer patients was almost completely accurate, with 78% falling into the Group I category. What did surprise me was that more of these were Sympathetics (43%) than were Slow Oxidizers (35%). There is a widespread assumption in the alternative health community that cancer is associated with excess “acidity”, though rarely are the parameters of this supposed acidity defined. At the tissue level, cancer cells do indeed typically produce excess lactic acid, which might be expected to result in a compensatory alkalinity in the pH of the blood. The 35% of cancer cases in our survey who are Slow Oxidizers do indeed have alkaline blood, but the larger number of Sympathetics (43%) has acid blood. (Note that, for our purposes, we are using the terms acid and alkaline relative to the perceived ideal venous blood pH of 7.46; all blood is mildly alkaline in the absolute sense). Whether acid or alkaline, both of the Group I Metabolic Types require a diet lower in protein and fat and higher in complex carbohydrates. This diet helps to acidify the overly alkaline Slow Oxidizers, but alkalize the overly acidic Sympathetics (this is because, as we have already seen, foods affect members of the Oxidative and Autonomic systems in opposite ways). This dietary approach is generally in sync with the prevailing nutritional consensus for cancer patients.

The results from our weight survey indicate that excess weight is a significant problem for both groups, but especially for the Group II Metabolic Types (60%). This has important ramifications for the ongoing discussion within the nutritional community about what kind of diet is most effective for weight loss. For the last thirty or more years, the prevailing nutritional wisdom — repeated endlessly by the media and mainstream medicine alike  — has been that a low fat diet is the best way to control weight. This paralleled a widespread advocacy in alternative health circles for a vegetarian or semi-vegetarian diet. The egregious consequences of this oversimplified approach, especially in the mainstream arena, are seen in the alarming increase in the numbers of overweight and obese adults and (even more alarmingly) children. While various individuals have always questioned this low fat dogma (most notably Robert Atkins, M.D.), it was only this last summer that it reached the level of a national debate following the publication of Gary Taubes’ provocatively titled article What if It’s All Been a Big Fat Lie? in the New York Times (Sunday July 7th). This, in turn, was an elaboration of an earlier article published in Science (for a more in-depth examination of Taubes’ articles, please refer to www.bloodph.com; click on the Newsletter link, then select September 2002).

The 60% of our overweight clients who are the Group II Metabolic Types require a diet higher in protein and fat, and lower in carbohydrates. This explains why the Atkins diet, which in many respects is a more extreme version of our Group II diet, can be so effective for many people. Fast Oxidizers and Parasympathetics require a higher percentage of proteins and fats than carbohydrates to maintain their proper weight, as well to optimize their health in general. For the Fast Oxidizers, these Group II foods slow down the overly rapid rate at which they would otherwise metabolize carbohydrates, and also help to short-circuit the process of insulin resistance. For the Parasympathetics, these same foods help to stimulate the under-active sympathetic branch of the ANS, helping them to achieve metabolic balance in their primary dominance system. Of course, a certain percentage of these overweight Group II types are diabetic, in which case we defer to the Diabetic Protocol.

But the Atkins-type approach is not effective, nor desirable, for everyone. The remaining 40% do indeed require a lower protein and fat, higher complex carbohydrate diet. For the Slow Oxidizers, too much protein and fat would tend to further slow down their already sluggish metabolisms, whereas complex carbohydrates add fuel to the fires of oxidation. For the Sympathetics, whose metabolisms tend to be already in overdrive, too many proteins and fats would tend to be overly stimulating, whereas complex carbohydrates help to activate the under-active parasympathetic branch of the ANS, thereby helping them to achieve metabolic balance. It is important to stress that it is complex, not simple (refined) carbohydrates that we are recommending to the Group I Metabolic Types. While the glycemic index suggests that there is not much difference in glycemic value between the simple and complex versions of certain carbohydrates (e.g. between white and brown rice), the reality is that the higher fiber content of the complex carbohydrates does indeed produce a slower oxidation rate. (The glycemic index measures the glycemic peak value derived from a given food over a defined period of time, but without regard for how long it takes within that time period to reach that level).

Once again, we can see from these examples how the “one-size-fits-all” approach to diet simply is not adequate. The advocates of either high carbohydrate or low carbohydrate diets are about half right and half wrong, though our survey suggests that the low carbohydrate advocates have a statistical edge! It should be pointed out that the survey presented here is from a particular patient population in a particular geographic area, with its own specific demographics. Whether these percentages would hold true in a larger population group, or in other geographical/demographic areas remains to be seen, though informal feedback from colleagues in other areas suggest that they would.

It should also be said that, just as we need to be leery of genetic determinism (the simplistic assertion that genes cause disease), we also need to be leery of what we could call “metabolic determinism”. While our survey results show a statistical tendency for diabetes and cancer to be more prevalent among the Group II and Group I Metabolic Types respectively, we should be very careful not to assume that individuals within these groups will necessarily succumb to these diseases. Plenty of healthy people can be found in both of these groups. Jeffrey Bland went to great lengths in his book Genetic Nutritioneering to point out that genes do not, in and of themselves, cause disease; rather, disease results from a complex interplay of environmental and lifestyle factors that alter the expression of the genes in the direction of a specific disease system (i.e. the genotype is modified to express the phenotype of the disease). Similarly, diabetes and cancer are not “caused” by belonging to a certain Metabolic Type, but by a complex of factors. However, it can safely be assumed that individuals who fall into one or the other of our metabolic groupings (Groups I and II) do indeed have a greater tendency to develop these diseases, a tendency that can be significantly reduced by modifying the diet according to the recommendations for the relevant Metabolic Type. While a tendency does not imply a predictable result, clearly it makes sense to do whatever one reasonably can to avoid such a result. Metabolic Typing can be seen as a powerful preventative tool that points individuals towards a way of eating that will help to minimize the possibility of the development of these degenerative disease conditions while maximizing the possibility of a long and healthy life.

Dr. Harold J. Kristal is a pioneer in the emerging field of Metabolic Typing. He maintains a busy clinical practice in San Rafael, California, as well as teaching regular Personalized Metabolic Nutrition Seminars to interested health professionals. He is the author, with James M. Haig, N.C., of The Nutrition Solution: A Guide to Your Metabolic Type (North Atlantic Books). For a schedule of up-coming Personalized Metabolic Nutrition Seminars for health professionals on the theory and practice of Metabolic Typing, please e-mail pmn@bloodph.com, or call (800) 772-0646, extension 202.

References:

Bland, Jeffrey S., Ph.D. Genetic Nutrioneering. Keats, 1999

Reaven, Gerald M., M.D. Pathophsiology of Insulin Resistance in Human Disease. Physiological Reviews   75(3):473-485, 1995

Pottenger, Francis M., M.D. Symptoms of Visceral Disease. Mosby, 1944

Taubes, Gary. The Soft Science of Dietary Fats. Science, March 30, 2001

———   What if It’s All Been a Big Fat Lie? New York Times Magazine, July 7, 2002

Watson, George, Ph.D. Nutrition and Your Mind: The Psychochemical Response. Harper and Row, 1972

Wiley, Rudolf A., Ph.D. BioBalance. Essential Science Publishing, 1998

Wolcott, William. The Metabolic Typing Diet. Doubleday, 2000
---

Case Studies Regarding Allopathic Nutrition VS Metabolic Nutrition

Case 1

The first is a fifty-one year old semi-professional male bike racer. For the last ten years, his health and energy patterns were excellent during the months of March and April. Towards the very end of April, his energy would diminish and he was not able to ride competitively for the rest of the year. He sought medical help from all over the United States He was given gama-globulin injections, hormone therapy, hyperbarics, all to no avail. Specialist after specialist treated him with no success.

He struggled with this problem for ten years and was about to give up bike racing when he chanced upon a referral to my office. He requested an interview first, as his experience with other doctors had been so unrewarding. He asked very perceptive questions and actually grilled me on the possibility of any success. I could not guarantee any predictive success but did offer him hope that there was a good chance improvement could be obtained through metabolic testing and balancing. He reluctantly decided to go ahead, and what we did for him changed his life. Tests showed that in March and April of each year, he was autonomic sympathetic. Through his hard exercise, he was exhausting his sympathetic dominance and transferring to the oxidative metabolic type, and becoming oxidative acid dominant.

What is required for him at this point is a complete change in diet and supplements. The diet for the autonomic sympathetic is totally different from the oxidative fast metabolic profile. His diagnoseable treatment plan was to change his diet and supplements to correspond to his changed metabolic type. We had phenomenal success with this patient, and he is now a happy camper able to race all year long.

Case 2

My next patient was a sixty nine-year-old lady with breast cancer. She had been treated with radiation and chemotherapy following a lumpectomy. Upon being dismissed, she was reassured that she was cured and would probably never have any recurrence of this problem.

A year and a half later the cancer reappeared. They told her she would have to go through the same treatment as before. She told them over her dead body would she go through that ordeal again. She was then referred to me for nutritional reinforcement. I informed her I do not treat cancers, and she should continue to be monitored by her physician. She agreed and we proceeded with our metabolic testing. Her blood via the glucose tolerance test proved to be extremely alkaline. We balanced her pH to near ideal with an acid forming diet, put her on a strict regime of pancreatic enzymes, used selected anti-oxidants and checked her every two weeks. After being on my nutritional protocol for three months, I advised her to have a thorough checkup by her physician. I might note here that during her treatment with me, her energy level had improved and she was not as sickly as she used to be. The hospital oncology unit examined her and informed her she had no evidence of any cancer, and she was in remission. Another happy camper.

Case 3

Along the same line, a forty-two year old female patient had undergone a mastectomy three years earlier. She visited me to check on her arthritis pain throughout her body. I noticed she also was extremely alkaline according to the glucose tolerance test. I instituted acid forming foods and supplements along with compatible amino acids and saw her two weeks later. Her pH test was ideal accompanied with much improvement in her arthritic pain, but more important, she is less likely to have recurrence of her cancer problem now being balanced metabolically. In order to maintain homeostasis, blood pH balancing has to be in the 7.46 zone.

Case 4

My next patient is a sixty three-year-old woman who suffered from high cholesterol and fatigue. Her blood pH was alkaline so I put her on an acid dietary and supplement regime. When she returned in two weeks she said she was feeling worse. Upon checking her blood pH, sure enough, she had become more alkaline. This could only mean that she was autonomic parasympathetic. We changed her diet to fit the parasympathetic profile along with proper amino acids and fatty acids. In two weeks, she reported for another testing, and her pH was ideal. She also told me she felt much better and was encouraged. She called back five weeks later and told me her cholesterol had dropped forty points, the lowest it had been in ten years.

Case 5

The final case history illustrates what can go wrong when another practitioner does not understand metabolic typing. In this case, I worked in two separate phases with a forty-four year old male with a hypertrophied and infected prostate. After seeing his physician and being treated with an antibiotic, the infection had soon subsided.

It was after this that he initially sought a nutritional consultation from me. I immediately ordered a complete blood panel(smac 26) and a psa test for his prostate. His blood pH was alkaline and he was truly oxidative alkaline so we put him on an acidifying dietary regime. In addition, we gave him pancreatic enzymes with compatible amino acids and essential fatty acids. He returned in two weeks feeling much more energetic. The result of his psa test was 16 and very high ggt, sgpt, and sgot readings with an elevated alkaline phosphatase, these four being liver enzymes. In as much as he was feeling better, we kept him on the same protocol and ordered another blood and psa test.

In thirty days, the sgots, sgpts, and the alkaline phosphatase had improved dramatically, but the ggts got worse. His psa went down from 16 to 6. We agreed for another month for him to be on the same treatment plan as he was feeling very bouyant and energetic. We ordered another blood test in thirty days and continued to test his blood pH. His pH continued to test in the ideal range. He was doing well on his high vegetarian, low protein, and low fat diet with his compatible mix of supplements. In thirty days when the blood tests arrived, the psa dropped to 2. There was continued improvement in his sgots,sgpts, and alkaline phosphatase, but no improvement in his ggts. In fact, they worsened slightly. At this point, I suggested he see a specialist to determine the problem with the liver. The specialist soon determined he was poisoning himself on the insecticides he was using in his gardening.

After two and a half months with the specialist, he developed another problem. He could not work, felt depressed, and had digestive problems. It was then that he decided to see me for another pH test. Although he had stayed on his diet religiously, the other specialist had changed his supplements completely presumably because he did not understand metabolic typing The supplements were very alkaline forming and the pH test showed his blood now to be very alkaline. We changed his supplements back to the original protocol, and in two weeks, he was back to his old self.
---

Dr. Revici’s Approach to Cancer: A Metabolic Typing Perspective
by Harold J. Kristal, D.D.S.

Approximately twelve years ago, I had a chance to meet the late great Romanian physician Dr. Emanuel Revici at a gathering in San Francisco to honor his extraordinary research work. Dr. Revici, who developed the theory of anabolic and catabolic imbalances as a factor in disease progression, was a genius whose monumental contribution to medicine and to our understanding of the disease process has yet to be widely recognized. Recently I had a chance to meet with Dr. Revici’s niece, Elena Avram, who is proudly carrying on her uncle’s work at the Revici Metropolitan Center in New York City. She gave me a copy of The Doctor Who Cures Cancer by William Kelley Eidem, a book about Dr. Revici’s work, as well as a short monograph titled Cancer: Causes and Implications for Treatment that she herself had written summarizing Dr. Revici’s observations about the pathogenesis and progression of cancer. I will be drawing primarily on this short essay in the following discussion of Dr. Revici’s research, and how it dovetails with my own work on Metabolic Typing.

The current thinking is that cancer is caused by an alteration of the DNA at a cellular level. Dr. Revici concedes that this might indeed play a role, but he feels that it is neither the only nor the most important cause. Oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes control how cells divide, playing an important but not exclusive role in the evolution of cancer. Proto-oncogenes exist in all cells, and may be converted into active oncogenes that promote unregulated cell growth when damaged by free radicals, toxins or viruses. On the other side of the coin, tumor suppressor genes down-regulate cell growth, but are also susceptible to damage by the same influences as the proto-oncogenes, in which case they lose their ability to prevent unregulated cell growth. Thus, a lack of homeostasis at the cellular level, due either to damaged proto-oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, can set the stage for the unregulated cell growth that characterizes cancer.

The current accepted medical treatments for cancer involve directly killing the cells that display such unregulated growth. In addition to surgery, chemotherapy and radiation are the only two accepted forms of cytotoxic therapy. However, three very important questions come to mind when considering these treatment modalities. 1) Do they really address the cause of the cancer? 2) Do they risk causing too much “collateral damage” to the patient? 3) How effective are they at preventing a recurrence of the disease? When used judiciously, surgery, chemotherapy and radiation may have important roles to play in controlling the progression of cancer, but at best they represent a delaying tactic. The underlying cause of the disease remains unaddressed.

Dr. Revici’s great contribution to our understanding of the pathogenesis of cancer stems from his delineation of the links between the five progressive stages of cancer development and the different levels of hierarchical organization in the body that are affected by each stage. This hierarchy involves the sub-nuclear, nuclear, cellular, tissue, organ and systemic levels, correlated with the stages of initiation, proliferation, invasion, metastasis and shock, Dr. Revici’s term for end-stage cancer.

Impairment of the DNA occurring at the sub-nuclear level represents the initiation stage in the pathogenesis of cancer. This impairment can be caused by free radicals, chemical carcinogens, radiation, viruses, physical  trauma, and acute or chronic stressors. When the DNA of enough cells has been deranged, it marks the transition to the proliferation stage. The invasion stage follows if the unregulated cell growth is able to spread from the cell to the tissue level, in part mediated by the secretion of proteolytic enzymes by the cancer cells targeted to break down the connective tissue. This itself can only successfully occur in tissues which are deficient in protease inhibitors, whose purpose is precisely to protect against such invasive destruction of the integrity of the tissues.

Once the cancer has moved from the cell to the tissue, it has the potential to migrate via the circulatory system (bloodstream and lymph), and to attach itself to distant organs. However, as with the shifts between the previous levels, the process of metastasis can only occur if certain conditions are met, including the cancer cells detaching themselves from the original tumor, evading the patrolling white blood cells of the immune system, successfully crossing the vascular wall and attaching to the target organ, and establishing an adequate blood supply for the survival of the new tumor. If any one of these numerous steps is interrupted, metastasis will not occur. The final or shock stage is characterized by disruption of metabolic function at the systemic level, and typically involves fatigue, generalized weakness and cachexia.

There is a widespread bias among alternative health practitioners favoring anabolic processes over catabolic ones. This, however, is an oversimplification that Dr. Revici went to great pains to clarify. Both processes are vital to the survival of the organism, and need to be in proper balance for optimal health to be maintained. A persistent anabolic imbalance is equally undesirable as a persistent catabolic imbalance. In fact, up until the shock or terminal phase, the progression of cancer is marked by an imbalance of anabolic factors, which push the cell in the direction of unregulated growth, beyond the original need of the body to heal itself from the damage caused by the initiating insult. It is only in the shock phase that the catabolic processes start to dominate the anabolic, and the organism begins to break down at a systemic level. However, even at this stage, the cancer process itself remains anabolic; but it has so deranged and destabilized the metabolism that the body systemically begins a downward catabolic spiral.

Conventional treatment focuses exclusively on destroying the cancerous cells, but in so doing it fails to address the underlying anabolic imbalance that set the stage for the development of the cancerous condition in the first place. It is well known that cancerous cells are found in most healthy middle aged or elderly people, but they are usually kept in check or destroyed by a well-functioning immune system. It is only where an anabolic imbalance persists, or when the various lines of defense between the different levels of bodily organizational are compromised, that cancer can take hold and spread. An effective treatment protocol must therefore address the underlying imbalances if it is to have a reliable success rate.

This bias in favor of the anabolic in alternative health circles parallels another widespread misunderstanding that I constantly encounter in teaching my own Metabolic Typing work to other health practitioners. There is a widespread belief abroad that most people are too acid and need to be alkalized. In point of fact, an overly alkaline condition (as measured at the level of the blood pH) is almost as common as an overly acid condition (acid and alkaline being here defined relative to the perceived ideal venous blood pH of 7.46, as defined by the groundbreaking work of George Watson, Ph.D.). Furthermore an overly alkaline condition can have equally dire consequences as an overly acid condition in terms of disease progression.

I myself sustained an injury to my right inner thigh after being hit with tremendous force by a tennis ball during a game. The leg swelled up rapidly to the size of a small football, turning black and blue. Within thirty days the bruising and pain had subsided, but the swelling remained for a full seven years. However, during this time, cancer growth was initiated by the localized tissue trauma, and was able to proliferate and invade the surrounding muscle tissue, perhaps, in part, because my immune system was weakened by years of exposure to mercury as a practicing dentist (putting it in during the first 30 years of practice, and taking it out during the second 20 years!). However, the cancer never did metastasize, probably because my lifestyle provided enough support to my metabolism to resist any attempts by the cancer to spread. I have always eaten well, taken generous amounts of supplements, exercised daily, and maintained a positive mental attitude towards life. The liposarcoma was removed surgically, and despite the strong objections of my oncologists, I refused chemotherapy and radiation, and have been in remission for over four years.

If the cancer remains at the sub-nuclear, nuclear or cellular levels it may never present a serious problem to the health of the individual. During the initiation, proliferation and invasion stages of cancer, numerous nutritional means may be employed to support the body’s own efforts to contain or destroy the cancer cells, and to slow down the hyperactive anabolic processes. When it transitions to the organ level, surgery may be the best strategy, along with nutritional support. But by the time a patient arrives at the shock stage, there may be no realistic recourse except the judicious application of a certain amount of chemotherapy, radiation or both to slow down the unregulated cell growth. However, it must not be overdone, as it generally is, because the body will be in too weakened a condition to deal with the harsh side effects and further immune suppression unleashed by the chemotherapy itself. It is, of course, essential to continue to nutritionally support the body in its attempts to stave off the catabolic destruction that is taking it over. Thus we have a localized anabolic imbalance simultaneous with a systemic catabolic reaction.

Every day thousands of cells suffer damage to their DNA but do not go on to develop cancer; so, clearly DNA damage alone is not sufficient to cause cancer. Dr. Revici discuses how the cellular environment or terrain has to be in a state of imbalance to create conditions conducive to cancer cell replication. Not only must the damaged DNA escape destruction by the immune system, but it also needs to proliferate and work its way up through the body’s hierarchical organization from the sub-nuclear to the nuclear, cellular, tissue and organ levels, overcoming numerous obstacles in the process. It is well known that many older men die with, not from prostate cancer, and a similar situation may exist with older women and breast cancer. In these cases the cancer is either sufficiently contained or growing so slowly that it presents no significant threat to the body. Clearly, in these cases, the terrain of the body does not support the rapid progression of the disease. In fact, it could be convincingly argued that the development of cancerous changes in the cellular structure is a perfectly normal phenomenon that only becomes problematic under certain specific metabolic conditions.

My own work with Metabolic Typing is based on balancing the metabolism with targeted foods and nutritional supplementation, using the pH of the blood as the central marker. It was Dr. George Watson who originally observed how small changes in the venous blood pH could affect the psychological states of psychiatric patients, reporting his observations in his classic book Nutrition and your Mind. Rudolf Wiley, Ph.D. noted that this same phenomenon among the population at large, and in relation to physical disease conditions. Metabolic Typing as practiced today is a system of nutritional analysis that seeks to balance the physiologic terrain in such a way that cancer and other diseases are less likely to occur and, if they do, it helps the body deal more effectively with them by helping to balance the underlying metabolic processes. My work is preventive in orientation, and I myself do not treat cancer or any other disease. Rather, I provide nutritional tools to help balance the inner environment so that the body itself is able to self-correct. Cancer may never be “cured” but, if it caught early enough, a body that is metabolically balanced certainly can contain it and prevent it from progressing into a life-threatening disease.

References:

Avram, Elena. Cancer: Causes and Implications for Treatment. Revici Metropolitan Center

Eidem, William Kelley. The Doctors Who Cures Cancer.   Sullivan and Foster, 1997

Kristal, Harold J., D.D.S. and James M., Haig, N.C. The Nutrition Solution: A Guide to Your Metabolic Type.

North Atlantic Books, 2002

Schenker, Guy R., D.C. An Analytical System of Clinical Nutrition. Nutri-Spec, 1999

Watson, George, Ph.D. Nutrition and Your Mind: The Psychochemical Response. Harper and Row, 1972

Wiley, Rudolf A., Ph.D. BioBalance. Essential Science Publishing, 1998
---

Metabolic Typing and Bioavailability
By Harold J. Kristal, D.D.S.  with James M. Haig, N.C.

In his classic text Nutrition and Your Mind, George Watson, Ph.D. noted that when the blood pH deviates too far from the optimal level of 7.46, it sets the stage for various diseases to appear. Amazingly, this can occur with pH fluctuations as small as a few tenths of one percent!  This profound observation was later corroborated by Rudolf A. Wiley, Ph.D. who elaborated on this principle in his own book BioBalance, which enlarged upon Watson's earlier work. Since my life-changing and serendipitous discovery of Watson's book in the1980s, this has been the underlying principle guiding my own work. Why, though, would such tiny deviations from the optimal blood pH produce such profound physiological reactions?

The pH of the blood is the most tightly regulated pH system in the body, simply because so many physiological functions depend on its stability. As a result, even small deviations can have profound metabolic implications. Perhaps the most important function of the blood is to transport oxygen and nutrients to the cells to be used in energy production (also known, technically, as the oxidative process). If the pH of the blood is thrown too far out of its very narrow optimal range, its ability to effectively transport nutrients and deliver them to the cells is compromised. Thus, even though a person may be eating a sufficient quantity of food, nutritional insufficiency can start to manifest at a cellular level.

One of the first manifestations of this imbalance is a reduction in energy production, simply because enough of the fuel needed as raw materials by the cells' energy furnaces (the mitochondria) is not getting through. Subjectively, this is felt by the individual as low energy, fatigue sluggishness, and a lack of "get-up-and-go" — which happens to be perhaps the single most common complaint that brings people to our clinic. This is also often accompanied by "brain fog": a reduced ability to focus or concentrate; poor information retention; failing memory; and general "fuzzy" thinking. Quite simply, this constellation of events is occurring because the brain, along with the other cells of the body, is being deprived of adequate nutrients needed to produce sufficient energy for optimal functioning. A hungry brain is an inefficient brain.

When I was in college, I was taught to believe that scientific documentation was paramount in proving the validity of a theory or system. Metabolic Typing is still in its infancy, so we simply do not have the large body of rigorous documentation that would be required to make it acceptable to the mainstream scientific community. Hopefully, with time, that will change. However, as I get older and accumulate more hands-on experience with this work, I have developed a healthier respect for the empirical approach — trusting my own experience and observations, regardless of how much they do, or do not, conform to accepted scientific principles. What I see happening with my clients has biological value, even if we do not yet fully understand all of the scientific ramifications. For example, we know that calcium alkalizes the blood of the Oxidative types (Fast and Slow Oxidizers) but acidifies the blood of the Autonomic types (Sympathetics and Parasympathetics). The alkalizing effect of calcium seen in the Oxidative types is easily understood with our current scientific knowledge, but its acidifying effect on the Autonomic types cannot be so easily explained. However, I know that this phenomenon does indeed occur, as I have witnessed it myself in thousands of clients over the years. 

Despite the gaps in our knowledge about precisely how some of these reactions occur, Metabolic Typing does provide a kind of predictability that is often absent from nutrition as it is more commonly practiced. We know that the same foods do not affect all people in the same way; and this allows us to tailor the individual's dietary needs to their Metabolic Type. For example, we know that the Group II types (Fast Oxidizers and Parasympathetics) require more protein and fats than their Group I counterparts (Slow Oxidizers and Sympathetics). For the Fast Oxidizers, these foods slow down their overly rapid oxidation rate, thereby helping to alkalize their overly acid blood; while for the Parasympathetics they stimulate the under-expressed sympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system, thereby acidifying their overly alkaline blood. Thus, protein and fat help to balance the blood pH of both of the Group II Metabolic Types, albeit for different reasons.

However, there is another important factor at work here that we alluded to earlier. Focusing on the foods that are most appropriate for your particular Metabolic Type stabilizes the blood pH, which, in turn, enhances the bioavailability of nutrients to the cells. Although it is vitally important that your food be properly broken down through the digestive process so that the nutrients so released can cross the gut wall and enter the bloodstream, it is equally important that these same nutrients are effectively delivered to the cells. Greater bioavailability of nutrients at a cellular level therefore leads to more efficient metabolic function and energy production.

One of the reasons we recommend specific multivitamin formulas to the different Metabolic Types is precisely to help "drive" the pH back to its balanced state, so that nutrients can be taken up by the cells more effectively. The Personalized Metabolic Nutrition Formulas I and II are intentionally restrictive, meaning that each one only contains about half the nutrients that would normally be found in a multivitamin formula. This is done deliberately to help potentiate the effect of the diet in balancing out the blood pH, but it is not our intention to keep people on these formulas indefinitely. After a period of adjustment, it is now our policy to switch most of our clients to Formula III, which includes the entire spread of nutrients in a proper metabolic balance.

Bioavailability is defined in medical dictionaries as the effect of a given agent on the tissues of a living organism. Metabolic Typing is a nutritional system designed to balance the pH of the blood so that the nutrients made accessible through the digestive process are delivered more effectively to the cells — all of which translates into more energy, a clearer head and better overall health.
---

Calcium and Osteoporosis
by Harold J. Kristal, D.D.S. with James M. Haig, N.C.

Osteoporosis (overly porous or weak bones) is one of the most common afflictions among middle aged and elderly people, with approximately 10 million Americans affected, of whom 8 million are women. An estimated 20 million more suffer from osteopenia (softening of the bones), a condition which typically precedes full-blown osteoporosis. While osteoporosis is not, in and of itself, life-threatening, it can easily lead to bone fractures that can become progressively debilitating as a person gets older. In fact, most elderly people hospitalized with osteoporosis related hip fractures die within one year. Even under less grim circumstances, osteoporosis reduces the quality of life for those afflicted with it.

The response of the mainstream medical community is usually two-pronged: drugs and calcium supplementation. Drugs, such as the widely prescribed Fosamax, seem to hold out some promise, but, on closer examination, do so by a kind of chemical sleight-of-hand. Bone is a living tissue, with a metabolism that is controlled by two types of cells, osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Osteoclasts break down old, worn-out bone so it can be replaced by the new bone that is produced by the osteoblasts. Fosamax works by blocking the action of the osteoclasts, preventing them from breaking down old bone tissue, while continuing to allow the osteoblasts to go about building new bone. The problem is that you end up with bones that have greater density, but that lack flexibility, and are therefore more brittle than ordinary bones. Obviously, this is not an ideal solution.

The other recommendation generally made is for calcium supplementation. Since calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body, and since 98% of the body's calcium is found in bone tissue, this would seem to be a no-brainer. However, this strategy is based on the assumption that osteoporosis is a disease of calcium deficiency, whereas it is often a disease of calcium metabolism. Furthermore, it assumes that the calcium ingested will necessarily end up in the bone; but calcium, if not properly metabolized, can just as easily end up in the joints (contributing to osteoarthritis), soft tissues (contributing to tissue calcification), or the lining of the arteries (contributing to atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries). In fact, it is quite ironical that the medical community —which has been notoriously resistant to nutritional supplementation—recommends calcium at all, as calcium is every bit a major player in the formation of arterial plaque as is cholesterol. Yet we have simplistically demonized cholesterol (which plays many vital roles in the body) while deifying calcium (which can lead to all kinds of mischief if it ends up in the wrong places)!

Calcium needs adequate stomach acid in order to be properly absorbed—a deficiency of which is common among the elderly—as well as co-factors like vitamin D, magnesium, and such trace minerals as boron and strontium. Even if calcium is indeed deficient in the diet, simply pouring more into the body will not necessarily produce the desired results. Furthermore, bone is built around a protein matrix, around which the minerals crystallize. If there is not adequate protein in the diet (or enough hydrochloric acid to digest it), all the calcium in the world will not do you any good.

In biochemistry textbooks, calcium is considered an alkalizing mineral, and is known to be one of the primary buffering agents used by the body to keep the blood pH stable. However, Metabolic Typing is based on the observation that how people metabolize food and nutrients is determined by which of two dominance systems (the Oxidative, or energy generating, and the Autonomic, or energy regulating) controls their metabolism. From this perspective, calcium is only alkalizing to the two Oxidative types (Fast and Slow Oxidizers), but is acidifying to the two Autonomic types (Sympathetics and Parasympathetics). While dietary calcium and all other nutrients are required by everybody, supplemental calcium is only desirable for one member of each dominance system: Fast Oxidizers, in whom it helps to alkalize their overly acidic blood; and Parasympathetics, in whom it helps to acidify their overly alkaline blood. (Remember that, calcium, like all nutrients, will work oppositely in members of the two dominance systems).

Conversely, supplemental calcium would tend to further alkalize the already overly alkaline Slow Oxidizer, while further acidifying the overly acidic Sympathetic. Thus, too much supplemental calcium given to the wrong Metabolic Types can actually create or exacerbate a blood pH imbalance. Because the body draws on the minerals stored in bone tissue to buffer blood pH, this will often result in a net loss of bone tissue.

Maryann was a middle aged woman with osteoporosis who had been told by her doctor to take 1,500 mg of calcium. However, she continued to lose bone, until she happened into our office. We determined that she was a Sympathetic type, one of the two Metabolic Types who typically do not require supplemental calcium. In fact, the calcium she had taken had exacerbated her acidic blood pH, leaching more minerals out of the bone, causing further bone loss. When we adjusted her diet and took her off calcium, her rate of bone loss dropped by an astonishing 50% in 3 months.

Doris was a postmenopausal woman whose doctor discovered during a routine physical that she was not taking calcium. She told him that Dr. Kristal had told her that it wrong for her Metabolic Type, and would further weaken her bones, a comment the doctor dismissed as nonsense. He ordered a bone density test, but, to his surprise and consternation, he discovered that she had 3% more bone density than the average woman her age.

Irene was a woman in her early sixties whom we tentatively typed as a Sympathetic. However, on follow-up testing, her blood became more, not less, acidic. We then determined that she was actually a Fast Oxidizer (the other acidic Metabolic Type), and not a true Sympathetic. After switching her to the appropriate diet and giving her supplemental calcium, we saw her bone loss markers return to normal within a few months, demonstrating, once again, the importance of eating according to your Metabolic Type to optimize physiological function.

Bone Density Testing

There are two primary ways to measure bone density, both approved for use by the FDA. The one favored by most medical doctors is dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, commonly referred to as a DEXA scan. This method uses x-ray technology to assess the density of the bone in various parts of the body.  This is then compared to the bone density of an average 35 year-old woman and rated accordingly.

The DEXA scan is the best method available to assess the absolute amount of bone lost, but it has two drawbacks. First, its interpretation is open to question, and different doctors will often read the same scan differently. Secondly, and more importantly, it is an invasive test that exposes the body to potentially harmful x-rays. Contrary to what radiologists will usually tell you, the amount of radiation used in these tests is not insignificant. In fact, there is no such thing as a safe dose of x-ray radiation, as has been elegantly and conclusively demonstrated by one of the country's preeminent medical researchers, Professor John Gofman (for more information on his ground-breaking work, go to www.x-raysandhealth.org). Dr. Gofman recommends that one should always consider the risk-benefit ratio of any medical x-ray, and only agree to it if the data collected will be able to positively affect the course of future treatment.

The other way of assessing bone density is the pyrilinks test. Unlike the DEXA scan, the pyrilinks test does not measure the absolute amount of bone lost; rather, it measures the rate at which you are currently losing it, something the DEXA scan is unable to do. While both approaches offer valuable information (and a combination of the two is perhaps ideal), the pyrilinks test is more useful in practice, as it provides a simple way to monitor changing levels of bone loss over time. Best of all, it is completely non-invasive, involving a simple analysis of bone breakdown by-products in the urine. Although the pyrilinks test is not widely available at this time, we are happy to announce that it is available through our clinic.
---

Which Vitamin C is Best for You: Ascorbic Acid or Calcium Ascorbate

Calcium ascorbate and ascorbic acid are both forms of vitamin C. Calcium ascorbate, being alkaline forming in the blood, will alkalize the blood; where ascorbic acid, being acid forming in the blood, will acidify the blood.

It is absolutely necessary that the venous blood ph be maintained in the very close proximity pH of 7.46. Anything below this would be acid; anything above this would be alkaline. Why is it necessary to have your pH be around 7.46? This is the ideal pH which optimal absorption and utilization of enzymes and trace nutrients takes place. If your pH is too far off one way or another, you will not be able to properly metabolize these precious nutrients.

A practical example that happens is when I do nutritional reinforcement for cancer patients. Generally cancer patients venous blood is alkaline. I find most of these patients are taking the ascorbate form of vitamin C, which is further alkalizing their blood (oxidative types). This means they are not able to utilize many of their enzymes or trace nutrients. Certain vitamins and minerals are either acid or alkaline forming in the blood. The scope of this report is to just focus on vitamin C. When the conversion is made to further acidify their blood, higher energy is usually observed. This is true for mostly everyone.

Most people are confused about the pH systems of our body. When the urine pH is acid, the blood is generally alkaline and vice versa. Taking a pH reading of your urine after a fifteen-hour fast will give some indication of the acid alkalinity of your blood. Type A personalities, lean people, and compulsive behavior are individuals with alkaline blood. If your nature is to gain weight easily, hard to wake up in the morning, and be less disciplined, you are probably an acid blood type. Acid blood people have to snack in between meals. These are all generalities. The best way of determining your blood type is by biochemical testing which is done by a number of us.

In conclusion, you should now have a good idea which Vitamin C is right for certain individuals. You should now understand why the pH is so critical for optimal health. It might even be possible now for you to figure out which Vitamin C is right for you.
---

Vitamin C and Metabolic Typing
by James M. Haig CDC

Newsletter November 1998

We all know that vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that is vital to immune function and numerous other metabolic processes. As an essential nutrient it must be ingested daily from dietary sources or through supplementation. But are all forms of vitamin C appropriate for all individuals? From the perspective of Metabolic Typing, the answer is a resounding no!

It is crucial that venous blood pH be maintained as close as possible to the ideal of 7.46. At this level optimal absorption and utilization of nutrients can take place, whereas if the pH is too far off in either direction (below 7.46 would be too acid, above would be too alkaline) the ability to properly metabolize our precious nutrients will be compromised.

The two most common forms of supplemental vitamin C are ascorbic acid and calcium (or other mineral) ascorbates.

Ascorbic acid, being acid forming, will acidify the blood of both of the oxidative dominant types (fast oxidizers and slow oxidizers). Fast oxidizers already tend to have an overly acid venous blood pH, and so ascorbic acid, which would make them even more acidic, would not be an appropriate form of vitamin C for them to take. Conversely, slow oxidizers tend towards an overly alkaline blood pH, and so ascorbic acid, by making them more acidic, would tend to balance them out.

Calcium ascorbate (and other mineral acorbates), being alkaline forming, will alkalize the blood of the oxidative dominant types. This would be a desirable effect for fast oxidizers (with their overly acid blood pH), but undesirable for slow oxidizers (with their overly alkaline blood pH) who would be pushed even further in the alkaline direction. Therefore calcium ascorbate would help balance out fast oxidizers but would exacerbate the alkaline imbalance of slow oxidizers.

One practical example of this would be cancer patients who, by and large, tend to have alkaline blood pH. Giving such individuals calcium ascorbate (which is alkaline forming) would push them further into an alkaline imbalance, whereas ascorbic acid (which is acid forming) would help move them towards a more metabolically balanced condition.

For autonomic dominant types these values are reversed, so that (for complex biochemical reasons) nutrients that acidify that oxidative dominant types, alkalize autonomic dominant types, and, conversely, nutrients that alkalize oxidative types acidify autonomic types.

Ascorbic acid, therefore, has an alkalizing (rather than acidifying) effect on both of the autonomic dominant types (sympathetic and parasympathetic). This would be beneficial for sympathetic types, who tend to have an overly acid blood pH. However, it would not be beneficial for parasympathetics (who have an overly alkaline blood pH) who would be further alkalized by it, and pushed even more out of balance.

Calcium ascorbate, however, has an acidifying effect on both of the autonomic dominant types. This would create further imbalance in the sympathetic types (whose blood pH is already too acid). However, it would help balance parasympathetics, who need acid forming nutrients to balance their overly alkaline blood pH.

Thus, using vitamin C as an example, we can see how important it is to determine the individual's metabolic type. Such knowledge allows us to select the appropriate form of this vital nutrient, as well as all nutrients and foods, so that we can learn to intelligently and effectively balance out our metabolic type, thereby achieving a new level of health and harmony.

Harold Kristal, DDS
---

Venous Blood Acid/Alkaline Testing

The importance for maintaining an optimal venous blood pH cannot be over emphasized. Any deviation from optimal venous blood pH of 7.46 can result in lack of utilization of enzymes, lack of absorption of trace nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and fatty acids.

When these deviations are too great or go on for a long period of time, metabolic problems arise as well as degenerative disease systems. Three of the most common complaints I hear from patients are fatigue, digestive disorders, and allergies. The first focus of my testing is to optimize the venous blood pH. We do this via a fasting urine pH, fasting blood glucose test, and a glucose tolerance and intolerance test. We do fasting blood dark field oil immersion microscopic work ups to check the various particulates in the plasmachylous bodies or fat cells.

All the above testings help me determine your acid alkaline biobalance profile.

In addition to the above tests, we do a complete capillary blood work up with our dark field microscope, electro acupuncture testing, urine pathology, bowel toxicity, and vitamin C threshold.

This test takes about one and a half hours and requires you to be on a 15 hour fast. Very few supplements are prescribed. Most biobalance profiles change with food. The proper foods will bring your venous blood pH back into biobalance. When this adjustment occurs, wonderful things happen to your body, because you are now absorbing and utilizing nutrients. My success rate is over 90% in helping people obtain a higher level of health and endurance.
---

The Confusion of Vegetarianism

Venous blood plasma pH ideally is 7.46. pH readings below that are considered fast oxidizers (according to Dr. George Watson), are considered acid biobalance profiles (according to Dr. Rudolf Wiley), and are considered sympathetic dominant (according to Dr. Nicolas Gonzales). Likewise, anything above 7.46 are considered slow oxidizers, alkaline biobalance profiles, and parasympathetic dominant. (Note: parasympathetics are too alkaline -- I corrected the above).

Why did these three brilliant scientists go to great lengths to determine acid-alkalinity profiles in their patients? Very simply; they found psychological problems, low level wellness, and degenerative disease problems occurring when their acid-alkaline profile was not balanced. While the techniques of these three scientists vary, the basic ingredient for establishing homeostasis are similar.

It is well documented that certain foods, vitamins, and minerals are either acid or alkaline in the venous blood plasma. Generally, what foods cause the blood to become acid, causes the urine to become alkaline and vice versa.

Genetics, food, climate, and stress are the four main factors that cause acid-alkaline profiles. We have little control over our genetics; however, we have the ability to control our climatic preferences, our food intake and stress.

It should be noted here that cold weather acidifies (note: Kristal is referring to the oxidative system by default) the blood and hot weather alkalinizes the blood. Eskimos thrive on high fat and high protein diets which alkalinize the blood to compensate for the extremely cold weather environment that acidifies the blood. Likewise, the tropical people in the equatorial belt thrive on vegetation and some light fish, a diet which is acid producing in the blood to compensate for the extreme hot climatic conditions that alkalinize the blood. I believe that your personal biobalance profile has a lot to do with your ancestry and their climatic condition that they had to endure.

I already alluded to the fact that certain foods make your blood acid or alkaline. All animal protein and fats make the blood alkaline. Only food from the vegetative kingdom can acidify the blood. There are, however, certain food in the vegetative kingdom that contain high proteins and fats that do indeed cause the blood to become alkaline. Doctor Rudolf Wiley carefully analyzed most foods and has given us a value as to how acidifying and alkalizing most foods are. The acidifying foods manufacture an acetate known as oxaloacetate. The alkalinizing foods manufacture an acetate known as acetylcoenzyme acetate. There is an interlinkage between these two acetate groups. The enclosed diagram will help explain this. Please note that the glycolysis cycle breaks down glucose to pyruvates which form primarily oxaloacetates. Some pyruvates manufacture acetylcoenzymes, but very little. We depend primarily for the fats and proteins to manufacture the lion's share of this particular acetate. The diagram is very simplistic in that it does not illustrate the many intermediary stages that vitamins, mineral, enzymes, etc. play in order for these two acetate groups to fulfill their destiny.

You will note that 20 percent of your energy comes from the glycolysis cycle and 80 percent of your energy comes from the citric acid cycle. I mentioned the interlinkage between the two acetate pathways. An example would be: let us say the oxaloacetates (acid segment) fulfills 100 percent of its pathway or yield, and the acetylcoenzyme acetate (alkaline segment) yields 50 percent. The total yield in energy would be 50 percent of the citric acid cycle. This means you lose 50 percent of the oxaloacetates that cannot be converted to Carbon Dioxide, water and energy. The same is true if you had complete fulfillment of the acetylcoenzyme acetate and just 50 percent of the oxaloacetate. Only 50 percent would be utilized in the citric acid cycle.

A venous blood plasma of 7.46 will allow maximum metabolism and utilization of nutrients, trace nutrients and enzymes. If you are too acid or alkaline, you simply will not be able to assimilate many nutrients and enzymes. In addition, you will have loss of energy.

If I have explained the forgoing in lucid manner, and I hope I have, you will be able to understand why vegetarianism, or any one diet, is not for everyone. We are all biologically different.

If the vegetarian person had an acid profile, is a fast oxidizer and is parasympathic dominant (all refer to the same profile) then the blood becomes further acid and continues to produce more oxaloacetates and leave a shortage of acetylcoenzyme acetates. This can cause serious consequences in our energy and metabolism.

I do hope this answers the question why certain of our population do well on vegetarian diets, and some have disastrous consequences.

The next question to be answered is how one is tested for their biobalance profile. I have extensive knowledge on Watson and Wiley's testings but very limited knowledge on Gonzales' testings. I have generated over 300 venous blood plasma pH's, over 1000 fasting blood glucose testings, and 3000 fasting urine testings. I have been greatly rewarded by my protocol. The success rate is two to three times more than any other dietary regime that I ever utilized. Dr. Wiley mentions that he has a 100 percent success rate in 55 percent of his patients and a substantial improvement in 35 percent. This is a remarkable success rate.

My protocol does not require that you take venous blood plasma from the antecubital vein; only a lancet prick in the finger.

To receive more information regarding these procedures you may attend our monthly seminar.
---

Allopathic Nutrition versus Metabolic Nutrition
The Townsend Report

Most nutritionists today practice allopathic nutrition. I will describe a few examples. Calcium is usually prescribed to individuals with osteoporosis. Niacin is often prescribed for high cholesterol or poor circulation. Vitamin B-6 is frequently prescribed for circulatory disorders. In each case, a nutrient is utilized as a "universal" treatment for a given condition. These various supplements are prescribed to treat the disorders often with total disregard for the unique qualities that make up each individual's metabolism. This is an allopathic approach to nutrition. What is so confusing and confounding about nutrition today is that many people are helped by these protocols and many are not helped. Some, perhaps, are made worse. Why is this? Today I begin to understand why. The late Dr. Roger J. Williams, noted biochemist from the University of Texas and discoverer of pantothenic acid, stated that we are all biochemically unique. I now understand that these biochemical differences define an individual's Metabolic Type. My experience has lead me to believe that it is the difference between Metabolic Types that is responsible for the actuality that, when it comes to nutrition, what makes one person better can actually make someone else with the same condition worse.

Understanding the following premises and facts offers a simplistic basis for this idea:

1. Ideal venous blood pH reflects the biochemical balance and metabolic efficiency in the fundamental homeostatic control mechanisms. The ideal venous pH is 7.46. Below this figure is acid, above this figure is alkaline. If one's blood pH were to be in the proximity of ideal, then optimum absorption and utilization of micro and macro-nutrients will take place. The further one's pH deviates from the ideal, the less efficient will be the absorption and utilization of these nutrients. This is when allergies, fatigue, digestive disorders, and a multitude of other disease conditions can occur.

2. Metabolism can be defined as the total life-supporting chemical and electrical reactions that take place in a cell or organism. The rate of oxidation and the affect of the autonomic nervous system are, I believe, two fundamental homeostatic control mechanisms that define Metabolic Types.

3. The Oxidative types relate to the oxidation rate-the speed at which the intracellular conversion of nutrients to energy occurs. The three classifications derived from the oxidation rate are the Fast Oxidizers (acid blood pH), Slow Oxidizers (alkaline blood pH), and mixed oxidizers.

4. The Autonomic types relate to the two divisions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), the master regulator of metabolism. The three classifications derived from the ANS are the Sympathetic, Parasympathetic, and the Balanced types.

5. Most individuals are dominant in one of five metabolic categories:

a) Fast Oxidizer
b) Slow Oxidizer
c) Balanced (Autonomic)/Mixed (Oxidative)
d) Sympathetic and
e) Parasympathetic.

Keep in mind that acid or alkaline blood pH can be due to either the influence of the oxidative system OR the autonomic system. The significant difference between these two systems is that most foods and most nutrients that acidify the Oxidative types actually alkalize the autonomic types, and foods and nutrients that alkalize the oxidative types acidify the Autonomic types!

This phenomenon is scientifically and factually proven. It is not theory, but fact. It was first observed by W.L. Wolcott of Healthexcel in 1983 and formulated into his principle called The Dominance Factor. (FN1) This essentially states that the effect of any food or nutrient on biochemistry is not due to an inherent quality of that substance, but rather to the Dominant fundamental control system, e.g., Autonomic or Oxidative, being affected in the person's biochemistry. This explains why a given nutrient can have different effects in different people. This also explains why what works for one person with a given condition may not work for another person with the same condition.

Because any nutrient can be acidifying or alkalizing, stimulatory or inhibitory, depending upon one's Metabolic Type, when health practitioners use nutrition to address disease states in humans without taking into consideration their Metabolic Type, it is an allopathic approach. The success or failure of the treatment is hit-or-miss, a matter of chance and not predictability. Whether the treatment is right or wrong will depend, I believe, on whether (or not) the recommendations are suitable for the person's Metabolic Type. Keep in mind, most foods and supplements are either acid or alkaline forming in one's body dependent upon the dominant system. An example of this is giving calcium to a person with osteoporosis; it would be great for the Fast Oxidizer (acid type) but would compound the problem for the Slow Oxidizer (alkaline type). It would also be good for Parasympathetic dominants (alkaline types), yet would be bad for Sympathetic dominants (acid types). The reason being that calcium is alkaline forming in the Oxidative types and acid forming in the Autonomic types.

One has to think of balancing the venous blood pH. Homeostasis is the body regulating the metabolism optimally. In people with bone loss, there is a problem with calcium metabolism, meaning that one can have either too much calcium or not enough. Because Fast Oxidizers are too acid, and calcium is alkalizing in Oxidative Dominants, Fast Oxidizers with bone loss need calcium supplements. However, Slow Oxidizers with bone loss, who are already too alkaline, actually need to limit calcium intake and increase potassium, magnesium, and manganese (as they are acid forming in the oxidative system) to improve the utilization of calcium of which they already have adequate or even too much.

Determining, first, the Metabolic Type and then making nutrient recommendations to address the underlying imbalance in the fundamental homeostatic mechanism is a metabolic approach to nutrition. On the basis of this research, I believe it can be said that, today, it is unscientific and insufficient to practice nutrition allopathically. One can first understand the Metabolic Type of the patient and thus practice metabolically.

I wish to reiterate that when the patient is balanced metabolically I see many disease symptoms subside. This includes chronic conditions with no (previously) observable cause. Allergies that a person might have had for years disappear. Fatigue problems will be alleviated. Digestive disorders most likely will be ameliorated. This is because the body will now utilize its nutrients optimally. However, it is important to understand that in none of these instances is the condition itself being treated. Rather, the imbalance in the underlying homeostatic control mechanism-the Metabolic Type-is addressed.

W.L. (Bill) Wolcott and I have evolved a new protocol on the principles of Metabolic Typing. The foundation for the protocol was laid by many great scientists of which I will enumerate three. It is very difficult to do justice to the monumental contributions Francis Pottenger, M.D., George Watson, Ph.D., and William Donald Kelley, D.D.S., made to the fields of health, nutrition, and medicine. The result of their combined foresight and brilliant research serves as the foundation for an evolving new nutritional analysis and delivery system which holds the promise of changing the way nutrition, and potentially medicine, will be practiced in the future. Bill Wolcott and I have been working synergistically for the past two years and have jointly evolved a protocol based upon his discovery of The Dominance Factor, current research of our own, and the past research of these great scientific minds.

Whenever most people hear the name Francis Pottenger, they automatically think of Pottenger's Cat Studies. Indeed, the cat studies were most valuable for their contributions to understanding the influences of certain nutrients, or lack thereof, on processes of growth, reproduction, and degenerative conditions. Probably of equal importance, though not as widely known, Pottenger carefully delineated in his Symptoms of Visceral Disease (FN2), the relationship of nutrition to the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system. Further he illuminated the autonomic influences as essential components in defining metabolic individuality. From his valid and reproducible research (FN3), we have extrapolated many of his findings and built them into our metabolic testing protocol. Dr. Francis Pottenger is truly the father of the neuro-endocrine aspect of Metabolic Typing.

George Watson, Ph.D., was a full professor at the University of Southern California. His biochemical research career spanned from 1950 to the mid-eighties. His research encompassed the role of biological oxidation in defining metabolic individuality, particularly as relates to psycho-chemical states and personality disorders. The oxidation rate, as he describes it, is the rate of intracellular conversion of nutrients to energy, involving glycolysis, Kreb's/citric acid cycle and beta oxidation. Through his objective testing, he classified people as being fast, slow, or sub-oxidizers. Fast Oxidizers produce an acid venous blood pH, and Slow Oxidizers produce an alkaline venous blood pH. He found that manifestations of physical and psychological imbalance occur when the venous pH deviates too far from the optimal pH of 7.46. He states that when metabolism, as reflected through oxidation and venous plasma pH, is too far out of balance, the patient is more susceptible to disease. His book, Nutrition and Your Mind (FN4), eloquently describes his fascinating research. The turn-around that he effected with many of his patients is phenomenal. I practiced nutrition founded upon his approach for many years. From a statement set forth in his research, I subsequently developed a mini-glucose tolerance test to determine acid-alkaline balance and its relationship to the oxidative processes. Dr. Watson's oxidative research is of equal importance to Dr. Pottenger's neuro-hormonal research in Metabolic Type Testing.

William Donald Kelley, D.D.S., is not a forgotten man. He lives in the hearts of many of his patients who are alive today because of his nutritional protocols based on his system of analyzing metabolic individuality. Today, Bill Wolcott and I have great admiration for this creative mind of science. Witnessing in his patients and realizing the deep import of the age-old adage that "one person's food is another's poison," Kelley was the first to utilize computer technology to analyze components comprising metabolic individuality. Based upon Pottenger's original work with the autonomic nervous system, Kelley developed a systematic, testable, and repeatable means of determining one's Metabolic Type based exclusively on the autonomic nervous system for the purpose of delineating the appropriate nutritional protocol (FN5). Today, Kelley is not recognized in the traditional circles of medicine, although he truly deserves this recognition. One of his patients who is now a patient of mine was diagnosed with leukemia in 1972. She was advised to have the traditional chemotherapy but sought alternative treatment instead. She saw Dr. Kelley in 1972 and sustained a full remission. Had she been treated with the traditional chemotherapy, she probably would no longer be with us today. This is the legacy that Dr. Kelley leaves with all of us.

Why is the legacy of these three scientists so important? Separately, each of them broke through the limitations of research current at the time to make a unique discovery; but, taken together, these three discoveries give us a fuller sense of the complexities of the human metabolic system. I wish to pay tribute to these researchers as they represent the cornerstone of our research in Metabolic Type Testing.

To learn what type one is, we have developed a simple, accurate methodology utilizing a modified glucose tolerance test along with other simple objective indicators and a dietary, physical, and psychological questionnaire. From this I can customize an appropriate diet and make nutritional recommendations. This answers a person's most basic question, "What should I eat?" "What are the right foods for me to sustain or nurture good health?" It is ironic that, as a member of a dedicated and esteemed body of nutritionally minded doctors and health practitioners, until now I have had no definitive means of making dietary recommendations-which are the absolute foundation of health. It has been a matter more of trial and error than of science. Note, whereas the Slow Oxidizer and the Sympathetic dominant types cannot have a diet heavily weighted in protein and fat, the Fast Oxidizer and the Parasympathetic types should eat these foods liberally. Most foods and supplements have different biochemical actions on each of these Metabolic Types. For example, potassium will acidify the blood in certain Metabolic Types (Oxidative) and alkalize other types (Autonomic).

A few of my case histories will depict a metabolic approach in action. The method is to address the underlying fundamental homeostatic control mechanism-the Metabolic Type.

The first is a fifty-one year old semi-professional male bike racer. For the last ten years, his health and energy patterns were excellent during the months of March and April. Toward the very end of April, his energy would diminish and he was not able to ride competitively for the rest of the year. He sought medical help from all over the United States. He was given gamma-globulin injections, hormone therapy, and hyperbarics. Specialist after specialist treated him with no success.

He struggled with this problem for ten years and was about to give up bike racing when he chanced upon a referral to my office. He requested an interview first, as his experience with other doctors had been so unrewarding. He asked very perceptive questions and actually grilled me on the possibility of any success. I could not guarantee any predictive success but did offer him hope that there was a good chance improvement could be obtained through metabolic testing and balancing. He reluctantly decided to go ahead, and what was accomplished changed his life.

Tests showed that in March and April of each year, his dominant system was autonomic Sympathetic. Through his hard exercise, he was exhausting his Sympathetic dominance and transferring to the Oxidative Metabolic Type, becoming a Fast Oxidizer. What is required for him at this point is a complete change in diet and supplements. For two months of the year, being Sympathetic dominant, his diet would consist of low purine-type proteins, low fat, and high complex carbohydrates. During the remainder of the year he required a completely opposite diet-one higher in purine-type proteins, higher in fats, and low in complex carbohydrates to support his Fast Oxidizer dominance. Supporting nutrients for his Metabolic Type changed as well. I had phenomenal success with this patient, and he is now able to race all year long.

Another patient was a sixty-nine year old lady with breast cancer. She had been treated with radiation and chemotherapy following a lumpectomy. Upon being dismissed, she was reassured that it had been successful and that the problem would probably never reoccur. One and one-half years later, the cancer reappeared. She was told that she would have to go through the same treatment as before. She refused to repeat the treatment again, having experienced it as an ordeal. She was then referred to me for nutritional reinforcement. I informed her that I do not treat cancers, and she should continue to be monitored by her physician. She agreed and I proceeded with metabolic testing.

Her blood via the glucose tolerance test proved to be extremely alkaline. I balanced her pH to near ideal with an acid forming diet for her Metabolic Type, put her on a strict regime of pancreatic enzymes, used selected anti-oxidants (which vary dependent upon Metabolic Type) and checked her every two weeks. After being on my nutritional protocol for three months, I advised her to have a thorough checkup by her physician. I might note here that during her treatment with me her energy level had improved and she was not as sickly as she had been. The hospital oncology unit examined her and informed her she had no evidence of any cancer, and she was in remission.

Another case history: a sixty-three year old woman who suffered from high cholesterol and fatigue. Her blood pH was alkaline (I thought due to being a Slow Oxidizer) so I put her on an acidifying dietary and supplement regime. When she returned in two weeks she said she was feeling worse. Upon checking her blood pH, sure enough, she had become even more alkaline. This could only mean that she was Parasympathetic dominant. (I always recheck a patient after 1-3 weeks on the protocol to ensure the determination of the Metabolic Type is accurate.) I changed her diet to fit the Parasympathetic profile along with proper amino acids and fatty acids. In two weeks, she reported for another testing and her pH was ideal. She also told me she felt much better and was encouraged.

She called back five weeks later and told me her cholesterol had dropped forty points, the lowest it had been in ten years. (This improvement in blood lipid content is frequently seen when a person is metabolically balanced.)

Another patient is a sixty-seven year old man. He was slightly overweight and he had high cholesterol and high triglycerides. His physician had put him on blood pressure medication and suggested a highly vegetarian diet with little fats. He heard about the work I was doing and scheduled an appointment for nutritional recommendations.

For the last several readings his cholesterol was 216, 219, 240. His triglycerides had been 138, 106, and 115. Mind you, he was eating a vegetarian diet. I tested him through Metabolic Type Testing and found that he was a very Fast Oxidizer (acid blood). I explained that my focus was to balance his blood pH, and for his type this entailed a diet higher in purine-type proteins and fats. Although he felt that, together, we were "flying in the face" of popular belief, he had seen insufficient results thus far.

After 3 months, he had his next test and informed me that his cholesterol was now 198 and triglycerides were 69. Additionally, he has lost weight, is more energetic, and his knee problems are somewhat alleviated.

The following two cases will illustrate the specificity of Metabolic Typing:

A 70 year old man, 100 lbs overweight, visited the office. Metabolic Testing revealed him to be a Slow Oxidizer. This Metabolic Type requires a diet rich in low-purine proteins and low in fats. Although he was already on a vegetarian diet, he was choosing vegetables that were higher in purines (spinach, artichokes, lentils) and was eating a higher percentage of fats than was right for his type. Adjusting his diet, and supplementing with nutrients supportive to his Metabolic Type, I addressed the underlying homeostatic imbalance. He lost 7 lbs within the next 20 days.

From an allopathic approach, one could think, "Well done," and make similar recommendations for all patients desiring weight loss. Not so.

A 17 year old high school student was brought in by his parent. He weighed 220.8 lbs with body fat of 50.8, was not that tall, and couldn't compete in athletics. Testing confirmed him to be a Fast Oxidizer. The appropriate protocol for him included a diet higher in purine-type proteins, higher in fats, specific vegetables, along with nutrients to support his Metabolic Type. In addition I recommended supplemental essential fatty acids, digestive enzymes, and garcinia cambogia 1/2 hour before each meal. One month later, his weight had gone from 220.8 to 201.

He lost almost 19 pounds and his body fat dropped to 42%. He dropped over 8% body fat and he was feeling very well. He is continuing to lose weight and participates in highschool athletics.

These two cases illustrate why treating symptoms succeeds by chance, and how addressing the underlying imbalance (the Metabolic Type) affords a predictable treatment outcome.

One patient, a lovely 15 year old girl was brought in by her parents. She was inundated with acne pustules all over her body. She also had asthma. For five years, her parents sought help, from both doctors and nutritionists, to no avail. Through Metabolic Testing, I determined her to be an extremely Fast Oxidizer, along with other imbalances, including a zinc deficiency. I recommended the appropriate diet and supplements for her Metabolic Type which included essential fatty acids and supplemental zinc. She promised to be diligent, including desisting sugar consumption.

Three weeks later, she had improved over 50%. Each subsequent visit she progressed, and by 6 months she had improved 90-95%. She no longer has asthmatic attacks and does not need an inhaler.

This is an interesting case to further illustrate a metabolic versus an allopathic approach. On the surface, one could say that I had used zinc allopathically, since it is commonly used for skin problems. (It is also common for zinc supplementation to result in a positive effect in some and no effect in others.) From a metabolic approach, I knew that additional zinc would be appropriate for her Metabolic Type. In a Fast Oxidizer, zinc would assist in bringing the underlying imbalance into accord. (The deficiency, itself, likely stemmed from an inability to utilize zinc due to the metabolic imbalance.) If she had been a Slow Oxidizer, zinc would further exacerbate the fundamental imbalance, thus it would have been an incorrect supplement to use. If a Slow Oxidizer were to take zinc supplementally, that person would not be able to metabolize it, and it would likely require supplementation of a cofactor in zinc metabolism, not zinc itself.

Likewise for essential fatty acids. Her particular Metabolic Type requires a greater amount of EFA's than do other types, and this I was able to determine. This case gets to the crux of why to use a metabolic approach vs. an allopathic one. The same treatment for the same condition would not have been effective in a different Metabolic Type. I could go on and describe others, but I believe these few case histories illustrate the amazing power tool metabolic testing can be.

It has been the focus of this essay to illustrate the need and basis for a metabolic (not allopathic) approach to nutrition, to describe the basis for metabolic testing, and to give credit to and express my respect for the gifted scientists from whose wonderful findings all can prosper through a lifetime of good health and well-being.

Harold J. Kristal, D.D.S.

Endnotes:

1. Wolcott, W.L., A Theoretical Model for Clinical Application of the Intimate Relationship between the Autonomic Nervous System and the Oxidative Rate in the Determination of Metabolic Types and the Requirements of Nutritional Individuality, 1983.

2. Pottenger, Francis Marion, M.D., Symptoms of Visceral Disease, C.V. Mosby Company, St. Louis, 6th ed., 1944.

3. Price-Pottenger Nutritional Foundation, P.O. Box 2614, La Mesa, CA 91943-2614.

4. Watson, George, Ph.D., Nutrition and Your Mind, Harper and Row Publishers, New York, 1972.

5. Kelley, William Donald, D.D.S., The Metabolic Types, Kelley Foundation, 1976.
---

Pottenger, Watson, and Kelley, Revisited

It is very difficult to do justice to the monumental contribution these three men-Francis Pottenger, MD, George Watson, Ph.D., and William Donald Kelley, DDS-made to the fields of health, nutrition and medicine. The result of their combined foresight and brilliant research serves as the foundation for an evolving new nutritional analysis and delivery system which promises to change the way we will practice nutrition-and even medicine-in the future. W.L. (Bill) Wolcott and I have been working synergistically for the past two years and have jointly evolved a protocol based upon the past research of these three, great, scientific minds as well as current research of our own to document a new nutrition and health paradigm we have coined Foundational Medicine. We wish to pay tribute to these three men as they represent the cornerstone of our research on metabolic type testing.

Whenever most people hear the name Francis Pottenger, they automatically think of Pottenger's Cat Studies.1 Indeed, the cat studies were most valuable for their contributions to understanding the influences of certain nutrients and lack of certain nutrients on processes of growth, reproduction and degenerative conditions. Probably of equal importance, though not as widely known, Pottenger carefully delineated in his Symptoms of Visceral Disease, 2 the relationship of nutrition to the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system. Further, he illuminated the autonomic influences as essential components in defining metabolic individuality. From his valid and reproducible research, we have extrapolated many of his findings and built them into our metabolic testing protocol. Dr. Francis Pottenger is truly the father of the neuro-endocrine aspect of metabolic typing.

Dr. George Watson was a full professor at the University of Southern California. His biochemical research career spanned from 1950 to the mid-eighties. His research encompassed the role of biological oxidation in defining metabolic individuality, particularly as relates to psycho-chemical states and personality disorders. The oxidation rate, as he describes it, is the speed at which the tissues of the body convert food to energy, involving glycolysis, Kreb's/citric acid cycle and beta oxidation. Through his objective testing, he classified people as being fast, slow or suboxidizers. Fast oxidizers produce an acid venous blood pH, and slow oxidizers produce an alkaline venous blood pH. He found that manifestations of physical and psychological imbalance occur when the venous pH deviates too far from the optimal pH of 7.46. Dr. Watson viewed health and nutrition as a patient specific problem rather than a disease-specific problem. He states that when metabolism as reflected through oxidation and venous plasma pH is too far out of balance, the patient is more susceptible to disease. His book, Nutrition and Your Mind,3 eloquently describe his fascinating research.

The turn-around that he effected with many of his patients is phenomenal. I practiced nutrition based upon his approach for many years. Based on his principles, I subsequently developed a mini-glucose tolerance test to determine acid-alkaline balance and its relationship to the oxidative processes. Dr. Watson's oxidative research is of equal importance to that of Dr. Pottenger's neural-hormonal research. Both of these brilliant scientists significantly advanced our scientific knowledge of metabolic type testing and have proven to be the fathers of the Foundational Medicine philosophy.

Dr. William Donald Kelley is not a forgotten man. He lives in the hearts of many of his patients that are alive today because of his nutritional protocols based on his system of analyzing metabolic individuality. Today, Bill and I have great admiration for this creative mind of science. Witnessing in his patients and realizing the deep import of the age old adage that "one's food is another's poison," Kelley was the first to utilize computer technology to analyze components comprising metabolic individuality. Based on Pottenger's original work with the autonomic nervous system, Kelley developed a systematic, testable and repeatable means of determining one's metabolic type and thereby delineating the appropriate nutritional protocol. Today, Kelley is not recognized in the traditional circles of medicine, although he truly deserves this recognition. One of his patients who is now a patient of mine was diagnosed with leukemia in 1972. She was advised to have the traditional chemotherapy but sought alternative treatment instead. She was treated by Dr. Kelley in 1972 and has sustained a full remission. Had she been treated with the traditional chemotherapy, she probably would be history today. This is the legacy that Dr. Kelley leaves with all of us. His Non-Specific Metabolic Therapy4 is grounded in the wisdom of treating the person who has the disease, over the disease that has the person.

Why is the legacy of these three scientists so important? First and foremost, it lays the foundation from which Bill and I developed our metabolic type testing. Our research has shown that every human being is dominant in one of five metabolic types:

1. Fast oxidizer-acid blood
2. Slow oxidizer-alkaline blood
3. Sympathetic dominant-acid blood
4. Parasympathetic dominant-alkaline blood
5. Balanced/Mixed

We have developed a simple, accurate methodology utilizing a modified glucose tolerance test along with a dietary, physical, and psychological questionnaire to determine any individual's metabolic type dominance. Without this metabolic type testing, accurate nutritional protocols happen only by chance, not through scientific rationale. This is why the field of nutrition appears so confounding and perplexing - what works for one patient with a condition does not work for a different patient with the same condition...unless you know the metabolic type involved. Keep in mind, whereas the slow oxidizer and the sympathetic dominant cannot have a heavily weighted meat and fat diet, the fast oxidizer and the parasympathetic should in order to be healthy. Different foods and supplements have different biochemical actions on each of these metabolic types. Potassium will acidify the blood in certain metabolic types (slow oxidizers) and alkalize in other types (parasympathetics). It is not the focus of this essay to explain our metabolic testing, but to give credit to and express respect for the gifted scientists that uncovered a wonderful discipline from which we all can prosper through a lifetime of good health and well-being.

1. Contact Price-Pottenger Foundation for more information [Price-PottengerNutritional Foundation P.O.Box2614 La Mesa, CA 91943-2614 619-574-7763

2. Pottenger, Francis. Symptoms Of Visceral Disease. C.V. Mosby, 1919.

3. Watson, George. Nutrition and Your Mind. Harper and Rowe, 1972.

4. Kelley, William Donald. The Metabolic Types. Kelley Foundation, 1976.

5. Wolcott, W.L. "A Theoretical Model For Clinical Application of the Initmate Relationship Between the Autonomic Nervous System and the Oxidation Rate in the Determination of Metabolic Types and the Requirements of Nutritional Individuality." Copyright, 1983.
---

Oxygen, Carbon Dioxide and the Krebs Cycle: A Metabolic Typing Perspective
by Dr. Harold J. Kristal & James M. Haig, N.C.

As we all know, oxygen plays a central role in the oxidation process, the intracellular creation of energy in the form of ATP. Oxygen is alkaline forming in the blood, while carbon dioxide - which is produced as a by-product of the oxidation process - is acid forming. The ratio between them is intimately connected with maintaining the optimal blood pH of 7.46, which is the primary goal of the nutritional protocols of Metabolic Typing. At this pH level, all of the systems of the body are encouraged to function harmoniously. If there is an excess of oxygen (or deficit of CO2) the blood will be overly alkalized. Conversely, if there is an excess of carbon dioxide (or deficit of oxygen) the blood will be overly acidified.

This observation is used during the Metabolic Typing testing protocol to help determine an individual's Metabolic Type. After taking a series of baseline readings, we administer a modified glucose challenge drink (containing significantly less glucose than the medical glucose tolerance test, as well as some added potassium). This drink is acid forming to the two Oxidative types (Fast and Slow Oxidizers), thereby increasing their blood levels of CO2 and decreasing their levels of oxygen. This has the effect of increasing the respiration rate, as the body tries to compensate by breathing in more oxygen, while decreasing the ability to hold the breath, due to a deficit of oxygen. Individuals who demonstrate these traits during the testing procedure (determined by comparing the baseline readings with readings taken at a specified time after ingesting the modified glucose challenge drink) will generally, therefore, be one of the two Oxidative types.

Conversely, the glucose challenge drink is alkalizing to the Autonomic types (Sympathetics and Parasympathetics), thereby increasing blood levels of oxygen and decreasing levels of CO2. (This phenomenon illustrates one of the key observations of Metabolic typing, that the same nutrients produce opposite pH effects at the level of the blood in the Oxidative and the Autonomic Metabolic Types). Accordingly, their respiration rate will tend to drop, due to the presence of more than adequate amounts of oxygen, while their ability to hold their breath will increase. These traits would therefore suggest that an individual demonstrating such a shift is one of the two Autonomic types.

The Krebs Cycle Revisited

Inside each of the cells of our body (except mature red blood cells) are several microscopic, oval-shaped organelles known as mitochondria. The mitochondria (or mitochondrion, in the singular) are often referred to as the body's energy furnaces, because it is here that the nutrients extracted from our foods are converted into energy. This happens through a complex set of interactions known as the Krebs cycle (named after its discoverer, Sir Hans Krebs), in association with the electron transport chain, which completes the work started by the Krebs cycle.

Essentially the Krebs cycle (also known as the citric acid cycle) involves a series of enzymatic reactions that transform proteins (in the form of their constituent amino acids), fats (as their constituent fatty acids) and carbohydrates (as glucose) into intermediate substances. These intermediates are then passed into the electron transport chain where they undergo a further series of reactions - receiving and donating electrons down the chain - to produce energy, in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), CO2 and water. The presence of sufficient oxygen within the cells is essential to the success of this entire procedure, as the term oxidation itself indicates. The primary substrates, or raw materials, for the Krebs cycle are glucose (extracted from carbohydrate foods) and fatty acids. Most of the glucose forms oxaloacetate in the Krebs cycle, while the remaining glucose combines with the fatty acids and amino acids to form acetyl coenzyme acetate (acetyl CoA). These substances are then further spun around the Krebs cycle with the help of additional amino acids, vitamins, enzymes and organic acids. In a dizzying whirl of back-and-forth biochemical transmutations, acetyl CoA reacts with oxaloacetate to produce citrate (citric acid), which then reconverts back into oxaloacetate until the coenzyme intermediates are shuttled out the bottom of the Krebs cycle into the electron transport chain to complete the production of ATP.

If insufficient oxygen is delivered to the cells, this entire enterprise will be compromised. Insufficient oxygen delivery can be due to any of the following: (a) a lack of oxygen in the blood, if the blood is in an overly acidic state; (b) an excess of oxygen in the blood in the case of an overly alkaline venous blood pH; this is accompanied by a concomitant lack of CO2, which, among its many other functions, acts as a catalyst to release oxygen from the hemoglobin, freeing it up so that it can be absorbed into the tissue cells; or (c) to an insufficiency of the enzyme 2,3-DPG, which is also required to release the oxygen molecule from the red blood cell. Alternately, an imbalance of raw materials fed into the Krebs cycle will result in less than optimal energy production, as both the oxaloacetate and acetyl CoA "sides" of the Krebs cycle need to balance each other out for its full energy potential to be realized.

To further complicate matters, each of the two Oxidative Metabolic Types - whose energy levels are directly tied to the functioning of the Krebs cycle - require a different fuel mix. Fast Oxidizers tend to burn up glucose too rapidly, therefore requiring more proteins and fats to slow down the rate of glucose combustion in the Krebs cycle. Conversely, Slow Oxidizers do not burn up glucose rapidly enough; therefore they require a higher percentage of glucose (and less protein and fats) to be fed into the Krebs cycle to fan the flames of oxidation. If either of the Oxidative types eats a diet that is inappropriately weighted in the wrong direction, the result is insufficient ATP production and metabolic imbalance.

ATP is needed to carry out all of our biological functions. One of its primary responsibilities is protein synthesis, which itself is essential for the production of the special class of proteins known as enzymes. Enzymes are the necessary catalysts (or "spark plugs") for every single biochemical reaction in the body, from digestion to the production of neurotransmitters and hormones, and from immune function to tissue growth and DNA repair. Impaired energy production can be seen as the central malfunction that underlies all chronic disease. Thus, we can see that feeding the body the wrong "fuel mix" for its Metabolic Type can have far-reaching consequences, and it is precisely these negative consequences that the nutritional protocols of Metabolic Typing seek to avoid.

Approximately 80% of the body's energy is generated through the Krebs cycle, in concert with the electron transport chain. The other 20% is produced through the less efficient process of glycolysis, in which a portion of the glucose that would otherwise be fed into the Krebs cycle is siphoned off and converted into pyruvate, then ATP. Glycolysis can only use glucose as its raw material - very little of which can be stored in the body at any one time - whereas the Krebs cycle also uses fat, a far more abundant energy source. However, glycolysis does not require the presence of oxygen (defining it as an anaerobic process), unlike the Krebs cycle, which can only function in the presence of oxygen (defining it as an aerobic process). Because the 20% of energy produced through glycolysis is not enough to drive our metabolic processes, it alone is insufficient to sustain human life; hence the need for oxygen for our survival. Furthermore, while the energy produced through the Krebs cycle generally burns "clean", the energy generated by glycolysis produces "smoke" in the form of lactic acid, a potentially damaging waste product that places a serious burden on the body's detoxification systems.

Case Histories

In our nutrition clinic, we see clients with a broad spectrum of health concerns. These range from a lack of energy or weight issues, to hypoglycemia, diabetes, endocrine problems, cardiovascular disease and cancer. We do not diagnose or treat disease, but we do provide nutritional counseling based on the individual's Metabolic Type. By pointing individuals at the foods and supplements that are best suited to them metabolically, we are able to optimize the functioning of the Krebs cycle and positively impact their health.

An example of this is a middle-aged man with chronic fatigue syndrome who was barely able to function when he first came to see us. He was only able to muster up enough energy to work for two or three hours each day, before needing to rest for the remainder of the day. After running him through the Metabolic Typing protocol, we determined that he was a Slow Oxidizer, with an excessively alkaline blood pH. Simply by changing his diet to emphasize oxaloacetate forming foods (rather than acetyl CoA forming foods) we were able to balance out his blood pH, and return him to his normal energy level in a few short weeks.

A woman in her mid 50's recently came to our clinic complaining of chronic flu-like symptoms, fatigue, muscle pains, digestive problems and depression. We determined her to be a Fast Oxidizer, so, in her case, we put her on a program that emphasized acteyl CoA forming foods. When she came back to see us a month later she was a changed woman, with a significant increase in energy and emotional well-being, with greatly improved digestion, and a marked lessening of her other symptoms. Significantly, though fatigue was a key element of her symptomatic presentation, she required a totally different diet than the gentleman described above.

The Autonomic Types

All humans produce energy through the Krebs cycle, but in the Autonomic Metabolic Types this process is overshadowed by the action of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), in collaboration with the endocrine system. Accordingly, the Autonomic types (Sympathetics and Parasympathetics) are not so dependent on the Krebs cycle as the Oxidative types for their sense of well-being. This accounts for a phenomenon commonly noted by practitioners of Metabolic Typing. Fast Oxidizers process glucose very rapidly. After ingesting the glucose challenge drink during the Metabolic Typing testing protocol, the blood sugar levels of a Fast Oxidizer will rapidly rise, then fall in a sharp curve. As the blood sugar crashes, so too does the individual's sense of energy and well-being. An Autonomic Sympathetic, however, can exhibit a similar or even identical blood sugar curve to the Fast Oxidizer, but the Sympathetic individual is generally unaffected when the blood sugar levels plummet; in fact, in many cases the sense of well-being will even increase. This phenomenon, which is at first quite baffling, is simply explained by the dominance principle. The metabolism of the Sympathetics is primarily driven by the activity of the autonomic nervous system, rather than by the oxidative system, so the dynamic energy of the sympathetic branch of the nervous system carries them through a blood sugar crash that would sink a Fast Oxidizer.

While we do not as yet understand the mechanics of Autonomic dominance as clearly as we do the mechanics of Oxidative dominance, the fact of its existence is quite apparent to the practitioner of Metabolic Typing. In the Autonomic types, the activity of the nervous system overrides the oxidative process; but energy production and processing is as central to the health of the Autonomic types as it is to the Oxidative types. It is this fundamental mechanism underlying all bodily processes that Metabolic Typing addresses, by matching each of the Metabolic Types with the correct diet designed to optimize their production and processing of energy.
---

Diabetes and Cancer: A Metabolic Typing Survey
by Harold J. Kristal, D.D.S.  with James M. Haig, N.C.

Sometime in 1987, I started to notice a pattern emerging among our clients: most of those with Type II diabetes were Group II Metabolic Types (Fast Oxidizers or Parasympathetics) while most of those with cancer were Group I Metabolic Types (Slow Oxidizers or Sympathetics). After informally saying for several years that each of these figures was around 80%, I decided earlier this year to instruct my staff to analyze our client files to determine the exact numbers. The data in this survey are drawn from approximately 1,450 clients typed since the year 2000. The results (see overleaf) more or less confirmed my suspicions.

My estimate of 80% of diabetics being Group II Metabolic Types was not too far off. The survey shows that the actual number is 72%. Of these, the majority (50%) are Fast Oxidizers. At first glance, this may seem counter-intuitive: Fast Oxidizers, by definition, burn up (or oxidize) carbohydrates rapidly, indicating an aggressive insulin response (insulin is needed to usher glucose, which is what carbohydrates breaks down into, into the cells to be burned up for energy). However, too much insulin produced over an extended period of time, in response to too high an intake of carbohydrates, leads to a "blunting", or reduction in sensitivity, of the insulin receptors. This sets the stage for insulin resistance and elevated blood sugar, which are the primary predisposing factors for Type II diabetes.

The Group II diet is higher in protein and fat, and lower in complex carbohydrates; but, for diabetics, we have created an even lower carbohydrate version of this diet which we refer to as the Diabetic Protocol (this is described in detail in our book, The Nutrition Solution: A Guide to Your Metabolic Type, available through your local bookstore, or directly from our office). This diet diverges from the out-moded high carbohydrate diet that used to be recommended to diabetics, but is in line with the more current understanding that diabetics require a low carbohydrate diet to control their insulin response and blood sugar levels.

My estimate of our cancer patients was almost completely on target, with 78% falling into the Group I category. What did surprise me was that more of these were Sympathetics (43%) than Slow Oxidizers (35%). There is a prevailing assumption in the alternative health community that cancer is associated with excess acidity, though the parameters of that acidity (i.e. which physiological system is affected) is rarely defined. At the tissue level, cancer cells do indeed typically produce excess acid (in the form of lactic acid), which might be expected to result in a compensatory alkalinity in the blood pH. The 35% of cancer patients in our survey who are Slow Oxidizers do indeed have an alkaline blood pH, but the larger number of Sympathetics (43%) have acid blood. (Keep in mind that we use the terms acid and alkaline relative to the ideal blood pH of 7.46, which is an inherently mild alkaline level; all blood is alkaline in the absolute sense).

Whether acid or alkaline, both of the Group I Metabolic Types require a diet lower in protein and fat, and higher in complex carbohydrates. This diet helps to acidify the overly alkaline Slow Oxidizers, while alkalizing the overly acidic Sympathetics (this is because the same foods have opposite pH effects on the Oxidizers and Autonomics), thereby helping to balance their blood pH. This dietary approach also happens to be in line with the prevailing nutritional consensus for cancer patients.

It should be pointed out that this survey is from a particular population group and geographical area, with its own specific demographics. Whether these percentages would hold true in other geographical areas remains to be seen, though feedback from our colleagues in other areas suggest that they would. It also should be said that, just as we need to be leery of the genetic determinism that is common in mainstream medicine (the overly simplistic assertion that genes cause disease), so too do we need to be leery of what we could call "metabolic determinism". Our survey does show a statistical tendency for diabetes and cancer to be more prevalent among the Group II and Group I Metabolic Types, respectively, but we should be very careful not to assume that individuals within these groups will necessarily succumb to these diseases. Plenty of healthy people can be found in both groups!

No disease is "caused" by belonging to a certain Metabolic Type, just as no disease is "caused" by a certain gene. Rather, diseases result from a complex interplay of various environmental and lifestyle factors. However, it can be safely assumed that individuals who fall into one or the other of our two metabolic groupings (Groups I and II) probably do indeed have a greater tendency to develop these diseases. That's the bad news.

But the good news is that this tendency can be undermined or eliminated by following the diet recommended for your Metabolic Type. While a tendency does not imply a predictable result, clearly it makes sense to do whatever one can to avoid such a result. Metabolic Typing can be seen as a powerful preventative tool that will help to minimize the possibility of developing these degenerative conditions, while maximizing the possibility of a long and healthy life.
---

My Nutritional Odyssey: Part II
by Harold J. Kristal, D.D.S.

I was the chairman of the University of California Holistic Study Group from 1983 to 1988. One of my responsibilities as chairman was to provide full day programs that would enhance our collective knowledge of alternative medical procedures. This was a very exciting time for me as I had the privilege of choosing the speakers that I wanted. Some of the notable guests that I brought to speak before the group were John Lee M.D., Richard Kunin M.D., Edward Winger M.D., Parris Kidd Ph.D., Marcel Vogel, Phylis Saifer M.D., Michael Rosenbaum M.D. and Jeffrey Bland Ph.D.

Most of our meetings were held at the University in the medical postgraduate division. The University, however, was not in alignment with our thinking on such subjects as acupuncture, homeopathy, nutrition, and fluoride and mercury toxicity; so before each meeting I had to get permission to present the program from the deans of both the Dental and Medical Schools. Because they were unwilling to allow certain speakers to appear on the University premises, they refused more programs than they accepted! Fortunately I had a fairly large seminar room in my dental office in Point Richmond, so I decided to move the meetings there in the mid 1980's.

Our meetings were very stimulating and educational, and we all benefited from being exposed to all this newfound knowledge. It was after one of these meetings, while I was cleaning up and rearranging the chairs that I noticed a book left behind on the floor. I picked it up to see if I could find out who it belonged to, but there was nothing to identify the owner. It turned out to be a book by a Dr. George Watson called Nutrition and Your Mind: The Psychochemical Response (Harper & Row). I started thumbing through it and found that I could not put it down; I ended up reading the entire book late into the night!

This book literally changed my life as it opened up to me the new world of blood pH. Watson had developed a protocol for assessing the health of individuals suffering from what appeared to be mental imbalances based on the acidity or alkalinity of their venous blood plasma. He described the Krebs cycle in a way I had not previously understood, emphasizing the speed at which the mitochondria (the "energy furnaces" found in almost all of the cells of the body) convert food into energy. He based his treatment protocols on how quickly or slowly the individual metabolized (or "oxidized") the nutrients in their foods. Using this radical approach, which centered around diet and nutritional supplementation, he had great success in treating people who were supposedly suffering from psychological imbalances. Though this did not gain him too many friends in the psychoanalytic world, he went on to become a full professor of Philosophy of Science at USC. Rudolf Wiley extended Watson's work and described it in detail in his book Biobalance (Life Sciences Press).

Initially I used the same intravenous blood pH testing procedure that Watson and Wiley used, testing over 300 patients with this method. However, this procedure is quite time-consuming and impractical, requiring four blood samples to be drawn from a vein over a 14-hour period, while the patient is put on a special restricted diet. Therefore, I decided to simplify the protocol, relying instead on small amounts of capillary blood taken at intervals over a two-hour period during a modified glucose challenge. I was very successful with this procedure and was able to obtain similar results to Watson and Wiley.

In January 1996 I published an article about my work, titled The Confusion of Vegetarianism, in the Townsend Letter for Doctors. Among the flood of calls I received in response was one from a man called Bill Wolcott. He was very excited about the article but insisted that I was only seeing half of the metabolic picture. He explained that only half of the population derive their energy oxidatively (via the Krebs cycle), and that the other half derive it autonomically (via the  neurohormonal system, under the control of the autonomic nervous system). He cited the work of Francis Pottenger, M.D. and his own mentor William Donald Kelley, D.D.S. to substantiate this claim. Furthermore, he asserted that the very same foods and supplements would have opposite pH effects in the oxidative metabolic types as they would in the autonomic metabolic types. I was so immersed in Watson's oxidative protocol that I was not very open to Wolcott's suggestions. But his parting remark to me was that if any of my patients did not respond to the oxidative approach to try viewing and treating them autonomically.

The very next day a female patient arrived at my office whose blood test showed her to be alkaline. I therefore determined her to be a Slow Oxidizer (the only alkaline blood type in the oxidative system) and put her on what should have been the appropriate diet for her type (high carb). To my amazement she returned the following week feeling worse than before! When I retested her blood I found that it had become even more alkaline than it had been when I first saw her, rather than more acid as I had expected and hoped that it would become. I immediately recalled my conversation with Bill Wolcott, and his claim that autonomic types responded the opposite way as oxidative types to the same foods and supplements.

So I decided, as an experiment, to put her on the opposite kind of diet (a diet that would be expected to further alkalize an oxidative type -- high protein) and she returned a couple of weeks later feeling great. When I checked her blood it had become more acid, something that could not be explained within the oxidative model, but could be explained within the autonomic model. The alkaline blood type in the autonomic system (the Parasympathetic) requires the totally opposite kind of diet to acidify and, therefore, balance them as does the oxidative alkaline type (the Slow Oxidizer).

I excitedly called Bill Wolcott, and so began an intensive three-year conversation that led, through numerous revisions, to the current testing and analysis protocols of Metabolic Typing.
---

Diagnosis and Disease
by Harold J. Kristal, D.D.S.

I firmly believe that health issues are as complex as disease issues. We now know that most diseases result from metabolic imbalances in the body. These imbalances may occur in one or the other of the two primary dominance systems - the Oxidative or the Autonomic - or they may relate to such secondary processes as electrolyte balance, acidosis/alkalosis, lectin reactions, prostaglandin imbalances or toxic overload. The secret to enhancing our health, therefore, lies in addressing these fundamental imbalances, rather than in the diagnosis of specific diseases. Diagnosis does have an important role to play, but correcting the underlying metabolic imbalances is more fundamental.

When patients seek my advice, I always ask them to name their primary health issues or concerns. The more common ones are weight loss, chronic fatigue, digestive disorders, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, memory impairment, arthritis, osteoporosis and fear of diabetes, cardiovascular disease or cancer. Often they have already been diagnosed with one or more of these diseases. My focus is not to treat the disease, but to address the imbalances that underlie the disease, because chronic and degenerative diseases only occur subsequent to a metabolic malfunction. I do not treat diseases themselves, but merely offer nutritional support to enhance health. It is important that anyone with any serious medical condition be also under the care of a competent medical doctor.

I would like to illustrate my approach with an example of a patient with breast cancer. Mary, as we shall call her, was a sixty-nine-year-old woman with cancer in her right breast. She had opted for a lumpectomy, as well as for the surgical removal of two lymph nodes, followed by radiation and chemotherapy. Subsequent tests indicated that the cancer had been eliminated. However, a year and a half later, her doctor discovered a recurrence of the cancer, again in her right breast. Mary was told that she would have to undergo the same procedure as before, but she steadfastly refused, and instead she found her way to my door.

She did wisely agree, however, to remain under her doctor's care so that her progress could be monitored. We then set about the process of metabolically evaluating her condition. Her medical history revealed a pattern of chronic fatigue and continuous flu-like symptoms, and she told me that she seemed to spend more time feeling ill than well. After completing our Metabolic Testing (which, at that time, included using blood tests to directly evaluate the blood pH), I discovered that her blood was 7.58, a strongly alkaline reading that significantly exceeded the optimal level of 7.46. (Although the difference between these numbers appears small, the metabolic ramifications are profound). This was preventing her body from being able to properly assimilate and utilize nutrients in her cells, tissues and organs, and she therefore had severe nutritional deficiencies, despite eating what would have normally been considered an adequate diet. Our first task, therefore, had to be to bring her pH back into the normal range, and, for this purpose, we used targeted foods and supplements that we knew would acidify her blood, in order to counteract her extreme alkalinity.

When Mary returned three weeks later she told me that she had much more energy, and that her flu-like symptoms had disappeared. I measured her blood pH again and found that it had dropped from 7.58 to 7.48. This significant change from severe alkalinity to near normal in just three weeks was allowing her body to assimilate and utilize her nutrients more effectively, and explained why she felt so much better. I suggested that she stay on the same diet program as before, but with the addition of specific supplements to boost her immune function, and pancreatic enzymes, taken away from meals, to counteract tumor growth.

She checked in with me periodically and, after three months, returned to see her oncologist. After running a series of tests, her gave her a clean bill of health. There was no sign of carcinogenesis and her cancer was in remission. I do not mean to imply that the original treatment plan that she had rejected had been wrong. In all probability it was a logical and well considered strategy within the oncological model. However, by using a different approach, we had addressed the fundamental metabolic imbalance that set the stage for the development and spread of the cancer in the first place. By balancing the pH of the blood, many disease systems will be prevented from occurring in the first place, or if they already have, they can be short-circuited or attenuated. In the final analysis it was Mary's own immune system that had overcome the cancer, once it had been given the right fuel for the task.

I do not mean to suggest that all serious diseases can be resolved as quickly and easily as Mary's. Each person brings with them a different set of variables, and some respond more readily and rapidly than others. But I am indeed suggesting that blood pH should be monitored in all disease systems, so that the patient's nutrients can be put to optimal use in supporting their immune capacity.

Diagnosis and direct disease treatment are very important factors in the practice of medicine. My own approach, however, is to address the person who has the disease, rather than the disease that has the person. I am a nutritionist, not a diagnostician. However, I am encouraged by the fact that many open-minded physicians are interested in this work, and that several are already incorporating it into their own medical practice. Sound nutritional practice can comfortably work alongside skillful medical intervention to optimize health.

Both disease and good health involve a complex interplay of many factors. It is naive to think that either a pharmaceutical drug or a vitamin pill will cure a major disease. Many times it requires a radical change in lifestyle, as well as diet. Adequate exercise, stress reduction and cultivating the appropriate mental attitude are some of the issues that also need to be considered. But eating the correct diet for one's Metabolic Type provides the foundation on which good health is built.
---

Do Genes Determine Disease?
by James M. Haig, N.C.

We live in exciting times for anyone interested in the life sciences. The Human Genome Project has amazed the world with the speed with which it has identified, or "decoded", all of the genes locked within the 23 pairs of chromosomes that are collectively known as our genome. These genes contain the blueprint for the structure and functioning of our bodies, and the implications of their decoding for the treatment of disease, the understanding of the aging process and, quite possibly, the significant extension of human life-span are profound.

However, some caution is also warranted. First of all, the social implications must be considered. For example, will genetic testing be required in the future by insurance companies, and will coverage either be denied or offered at substantially higher rates to people who display the genes associated with particular chronic diseases? And what would be the psychological impact on an individual to be informed that he or she bore the genes associated with cancer or cardiovascular disease? Meanwhile the pharmaceutical companies are salivating at the prospect of developing a whole new class of drugs that directly target specific genetic predispositions.

This situation points to two closely related concepts that have tended to characterize western thinking since the rise of the scientific worldview in the last couple of hundred years. The first is reductionism, or the tendency to reduce complex situations to their component parts; the second is determinism, or the belief that an outcome is entirely predetermined by its constituent causes. When it comes to our genetic inheritance, we must be cautious neither to reduce all human experience to a genetic model nor to assume that a genetic predisposition equals a predetermined outcome.

These issues are elegantly explored by one of the country's most respected nutritionists and biochemical researchers, Jeffrey Bland, Ph.D., in his book Genetic Nutritioneering (Keats, 1999). Bland argues that genes in and of themselves do not give rise to disease; rather, disease results from a complex interaction of environmental or lifestyle factors that alter the expression of the genes in the direction of a specific disease system. Thus your genotype is modified to express the phenotype (or manifestation) of a particular disease. Stated differently, a genetic predisposition does not imply a predictable result. As Bland puts it: "In terms of your health or disease state as an adult, your phenotype is determined by the way you have treated your genes throughout your life".

Diet, environment and lifestyle factors, such as stress, play major roles in determining the health of an individual. A recent study performed by the internationally renowned Karolinska Institute in Sweden tracked almost 45,000 pairs of twins to assess the role that genetic heredity plays in the development of cancer. This exhaustive study showed that environmental, not genetic, factors were the primary cause of cancer in upwards of 64% of the cases studied, and as much as 72% in the case of breast cancer. Other studies have suggested that environmental factors are responsible for 80-90% of cancers.

Foremost among these factors are chemical pollutants and toxins, and exposure to radiation and powerful electromagnetic fields. The bad news is that we cannot entirely protect ourselves from these influences, short of lobbying for more stringent environmental controls. The good news, though, is that we can do a lot to protect our internal environment from the negative impact of the external environment. Diet, supplementation, exercise and stress reduction all play crucial roles in determining how effective the body will be in responding to these environmental challenges. Metabolic Typing can be seen in this context as a powerful way to modify gene expression. As Bland says: "All the genetic messages you need to remake yourself are present in every cell of your body". By feeding our body the foods and supplements appropriate to our particular metabolism, we give our genes the stimuli they need to remake ourselves in the image of optimal health and longevity.
---

Night and Day: Anabolic and Catabolic
by Harold J. Kristal, D.D.S. with James M. Haig, N.C.

We are all creatures of the earth. Each moment of our lives we are affected by the rotational movements of our planet and other heavenly bodies, and by the electromagnetic energies of the entire universe. For many years, scientists have been researching the related phenomena of circadian rhythms, biochemical cycles that move in definable patterns within a 24 hour period. Dr. Emanuel Revici, the late great Romanian physician, delineated two primary circadian cycles which he named anabolic and catabolic.

The anabolic cycle or phase is characterized by regeneration and repair, while the catabolic cycle or phase is characterized by energy expenditure. Dr. Revici believed that the anabolic phase lasts from 4 PM to 4 AM, and the catabolic from 4 AM to 4 PM. Guy Schenker, D.C., who has further elaborated on this aspect of Revici's work, states that the anabolic phase runs from 8 PM to 6 AM, and the catabolic from 8 AM to 6 PM

Regardless of these time differentials, it is clear that the anabolic phase approximately corresponds to nighttime (from sunset to sunrise) and the catabolic to daytime (from sunrise to sunset). Generally, our normal daily experience conforms to this model: by and large, we work and play by day (expending energy), and we rest at night (recharging energy). Every aspect of our physiology - such as our endocrine, immune and nervous systems - is regulated by these two cycles. An imbalance in either of these cycles will lead to symptoms that, if not addressed, will eventually manifest as disease. Health, in this model, can be defined as a harmonious balance, or homeostasis, between these two daily cycles.

Traditional Chinese medicine also developed a circadian rhythm system of its own, correlating each organ system in our body with specific times in the 24 hour cycle when that organ was thought to be most active. In our own practice, we have often observed a remarkable correlation between this Chinese "body clock" and specific times of the day or night when our clients report various symptom phenomena.

While the main focus of our work is on what we consider to be the primary imbalances of the Oxidative and Autonomic systems, several of the tests we perform also help to pinpoint a secondary anabolic or catabolic imbalance. The symptoms our clients present can also offer clues. For example, many people complain of sleep disturbances - either of not being able to get adequate sleep, or of a tendency to want to sleep too much. Sleep can be viewed as the ultimate anabolic experience. It is the primary event in the 24 hour cycle that the body uses to recharges its batteries, allowing organ systems that are active during the day to rest and recuperate. Meanwhile the immune system takes advantage of this downtime to intensify its "clean-up" operations in the body, searching out and destroying viruses, bacteria and pathogens, and repairing damaged tissues.

Sleep disturbances have become epidemic in our culture, partly because we tend to value action and "doing" over relaxation and "being". Stress and digestive problems, such as acid reflux, are primary contributors, as are cellular pH changes and adrenal excess or insufficiency (too much cortisol makes it hard to sleep; not enough makes it hard to stay awake!). The hormone melatonin, produced by the pineal gland, also plays a key role in regulating the sleep-wake cycle. Insufficient melatonin production - which is a common phenomenon of aging - adds to the difficulty of getting a good night's sleep and, thereby, recharging our batteries.

Optimally, our energy derives from being in tune with the electromagnetic forces of the macrocosm, the universe itself. How we choose to use that energy on a microcosmic level depends on many factors - including the influences brought to bear by our immediate, local environment, and the strength of our own vital reserves in dealing with the various stressors that challenge our system on a daily basis. The stress that a modern man or woman may face over losing his or her job or going through a difficult divorce activates similar stress chemistry as a Neanderthal encountering a woolly mammoth or a saber-toothed tiger. The cellular or microscopic responses are usually adaptive; that is, changes in our hormonal, immune and nervous systems, as well as in pH levels, are generally in response to macroscopic, or external, stressors. This interplay is what Dr. Hans Selye -the father of modern research into the effects of stress in our lives -referred to as the General Adaptive Syndrome.

Anabolic and catabolic factors manifest at the cellular level in an interplay of lipids (fat-based substances) in the cell membranes that function as a kind of "skin" surrounding each cell. Fatty acids are oriented vertically in the cell membrane (lining up from outside to inside), while sterols are primarily oriented horizontally. Together they provide a latticework structure that controls cellular permeability, regulating the inflow of the oxygen and nutrients needed for the generation of energy within the cell, and the outflow of metabolic wastes. The fatty acids primarily contribute flexibility and permeability to the cell membrane, while the sterols function as valves controlling the movement of substances into and out of the cell.

Too many sterols, or not enough fatty acids, block or clog the cell membranes, interrupting the free movement into and out of the cells. This leads to an anabolic imbalance in the cells, effectively stifling their ability to "breathe". But too few sterols, or too many fatty acids, has the opposite effect, creating an overly permeable or "leaky" membrane, with insufficient control over the movement of nutrients and wastes. This leads to a catabolic condition, comparable to cellular hyperventilation. Cellular respiration may slow down as a normal part of the anabolic phase of the 24 hour cycle, and speed up during the catabolic phase. But when either part of the cycle becomes chronically unbalanced, problems with energy production will inevitably follow, eventually manifesting as disease. By optimizing the pH of the blood through Metabolic Typing, we seek to prevent or redress any such imbalance.

Also see: http://www.royalrife.com/hbal.html
---

Survey: Metabolic Type Linked To Cancer & Diabetes

San Rafael, CA – In a study published in The Townsend Letter for Doctors (March 2003), 1444 individuals were given a mini-glucose challenge test to determine their Metabolic Type. Dr Harold J. Kristal, a pioneer in the field of Metabolic Nutrition, and originator of the mini-glucose challenge test, reports on an interesting pattern between chronic disease and Metabolic Type. When those clients with a known diagnosis of cancer were tested, 78% of them were of the Metabolic Type that has a problem processing fats and proteins.  Correspondingly, 72% of those patients with a diagnosis of diabetes or pre-diabetics (commonly called Syndrome X) were of the Metabolic Type that have difficulty processing carbohydrates.

Kristal says “our work with Metabolic Typing puts us in a unique position to observe relationships between particular disease conditions and the different Metabolic Types.  (A Metabolic Type can be understood as the characteristic way in which an individual produces and processes energy.) By addressing the individual at this fundamental level, we are able to match up their metabolism with an appropriate diet that will help to protect the body from the development of the common degenerative diseases.” The objective of the test is to use dietary modification to optimize blood pH. The ideal blood pH is 7.46 a mildly alkaline level. Personalized Metabolic Nutrition helps regulate the pH level in humans allowing for optimal health and well-being.”

Kristal adds that “diabetes, and cancer are not caused by belonging to a certain Metabolic Type, but by a complex of factors. However, we do see that different types show tendencies for different diseases. If you eat for your Metabolic Type and balance your pH, it can be a powerful preventative tool, especially for those with a family history of these diseases.”

Dr Harold J. Kristal
---

Metabolic Typing and Blood pH
Harold J. Kristal, D.D.S.

As most of you know, the blood pH curve, as inferred from the way the blood sugar responds to a special glucose challenge drink, is the central marker used in our Metabolic Typing protocol. I thought it might be interesting to give you some background as to the origin of this valuable marker.

It was first observed by George Watson, Ph.D., a full professor of psychology at the University of Southern California (USC), that small changes in venous blood plasma pH levels made a discernible difference in the moods and behaviors of many of his research subjects. It was he who first determined that the slightly alkaline level of 7.46 was the optimal venous blood pH; anything above, he considered overly alkaline, and anything below, he considered overly acid (we follow his relative usage of the terms acid and alkaline as being in relation to the perceived ideal of 7.46). Up until this time, venous blood pH was only measured in tenths (e.g. 7.3, 7.4, 7.5, etc.) but Watson was the first to measure it in hundreds (e.g. 7.35, 7.46, 7.54, etc.).

Watson's ground-breaking observation — based on measuring the venous blood pH of psychiatric patients at the USC hospital — was that small changes in their blood  pH could predict the degree and severity of the patient's psychological and behavioral problems. After performing such analyses for some time, he began to experiment with the use of foods and nutritional supplements to help drive the blood pH towards the optimal balance point of 7.46. His research and clinical successes were documented in his classic book Nutrition and Your Mind: The Psychochemical Response (Harper & Row, 1972). Although his work was hailed by a small number of alternatively minded physicians, it was shunned by the mainstream medical and psychiatric community, whose professional pride was piqued by Watson's bold assertion that psychoanalysis would not be fruitful if the patient's blood pH was not balanced, and by his further claim that many apparently deep-seated psychological problems were simply unrecognized blood sugar imbalances that could be corrected by dietary changes.

Some years later, another pH pioneer stepped up to the plate to verify and expand upon Dr. Watson's work. Rudolf Wiley, Ph.D., a physicist by training, discovered that not only were psychogenic conditions improved by balancing blood pH, but so too were many physical conditions, such as fatigue, allergies, obesity and cardiovascular problems. In his beautifully written book BioBalance (Essential Science Publishing, 1989) Wiley describes how to draw and centrifuge blood to determine its pH. He also reported on the results of an extensive research project that he underwrote and conducted which demonstrated the pH effects of commonly eaten foods in the body, research that, to this day, forms the basis of the food selections recommended to the various Metabolic Types.

I myself performed Rudolf Wiley's testing protocol on over three hundred patients. However, it involved four intravenous blood draws over a fourteen hour period, and the use of extremely technique-sensitive equipment, so I sought out a less time consuming, costly and invasive approach. I remembered that Dr. Watson had mentioned in his book how the glucose tolerance test could be used to infer whether an individual's blood was running on the relatively acid or alkaline side. After two years of trial and error, I perfected what I now refer to as the mini-glucose tolerance test ("mini" because it uses less than half the glucose of the original medical version), which has an over 80% accuracy rate. This innovation makes it possible to complete the process of Metabolic Typing in two hours, rather than the fourteen hours required by Rudolf Wiley's method.

Another encounter early in 1996 further expanded and deepened my understanding of Watson and Wiley's theories of acid-alkaline balance. After I had written an article on my work in the Townsend Letter for Doctors, I was contacted by William L. Wolcott who presented to me his radical new theory of the dominance principle. This principle is based on the observation that there are two primary systems in the body responsible for the production and management of energy: the Oxidative, or energy generating system (which is what Watson and Wiley's work was exploring); and the Autonomic, or energy regulating system, which had been explored initially by Francis M. Pottenger, M.D., and later developed by William Donald Kelley, D.D.S. Wolcott's theory asserted that one or the other system was most dominant in any given individual, and that this dominant system determined whether or not foods would have an acid or alkaline forming effect in the body. This model challenges the older but still common paradigm that asserts that foods have a fixed pH effect in everyone who eats them; whereas Wolcott's dominance theory asserts that the net pH effect of the food once it enters the body is modified by the metabolism of the person consuming it. Over three years of extensive collaboration, Wolcott and I developed the prototype of the testing methodology that we use today to determine the different Metabolic Types.

People come to our clinic for a variety of reasons, and with health conditions ranging from minor to life threatening. Many of the benefits of Metabolic Typing are preventative, helping people to avoid potentially serious diseases by improving their nutritional status and metabolic functioning. Sometimes, however, they can be dramatic, as in the case of a 68 year-old woman who came to my office after undergoing a lumpectomy, chemotherapy and radiation for breast cancer, only to be told that the cancer had returned. She was determined not to repeat her previous ordeal, and so she decided to have her blood pH tested. It turned out that she was so excessively alkaline that she was unable to properly metabolize her nutrients, and was, in effect, starving at a cellular level. I changed her diet, gave her a few basic supplements, and almost immediately her energy improved. When she returned to her oncologist three months later, he told her that she was in remission. Eleven years later, her cancer still has not returned, and she remains a living testament to the power of metabolically balancing the blood pH.
---

Metabolic Typing and Chronic Diseases
by Harold J. Kristal, D.D.S.

I recently had the pleasure of addressing a group of approximately 150 people in Las Vegas, Nevada. I reiterated one of my favorite themes — the importance of treating the person with the disease, rather than the disease with the person. While the medical community focuses on addressing disease conditions head on (an approach that is appropriate for acute illnesses), the Metabolic Typing practitioner is more interested in evaluating the underlying metabolic imbalances that allow the disease to take hold in the first place. This latter approach is much more effective in dealing with chronic health conditions, as it addresses the internal "terrain" in which the disease appears, rather than merely its symptoms.

The person with the disease generally has one or more metabolic imbalances. These range from oxidizing food (or converting it into energy) too slowly or too quickly, to an over-expression of either the sympathetic (hyper) or parasympathetic (hypo) branches of the autonomic nervous system, the body's primary regulator of energy. Secondary metabolic imbalances include acidosis or alkalosis, anabolic or catabolic conditions (affecting the body's ability to efficiently transport nutrients into, and wastes out of, the cells), and electrolyte stress or insufficiency (which affect cardiovascular functioning and/or energy levels). Sustained imbalances in any of these physiological control systems can set the stage for ill health.

One of the cornerstones of the Metabolic Typing protocol is evaluating blood pH, which we infer from the relative speed at which glucose is cleared from their bloodstream following the ingestion of a glucose-potassium challenge drink. When the blood pH deviates too far from the optimal level of 7.46, disease conditions are more likely to manifest. This is equally true whether the blood is overly alkaline (i.e. with a pH greater than 7.46) or overly acid (with a pH less than 7.46). It is often rather simplistically stated by alternative health experts that diseases appear when we are too acidic; but, actually, they can equally appear if we are too alkaline. The more extreme the relative acidity or alkalinity of the blood, the more extreme the manifestation of the disease is likely to be.

We find many times that when we are able to improve the blood pH profile, chronic disease symptoms lessen or even disappear, allergies recede, energy increases, and weight is more easily controlled. While right diet remains the cornerstone of our nutritional intervention (food is your best medicine!), the concurrent judicious use of specific supplements is also extremely helpful.

During the question-and-answer period at my talk that evening, an attractive middle aged lady recounted how she had been battling a case of candidiasis (systemic overgrowth of the candida albicans yeast) that was so severe that nothing could get rid of it, including a strict diet and liberal use of probiotics (beneficial bacteria, like acidophilus). The only thing that had helped her was Candex, an innovative supplement with which we have had good success in our own clinic, but even its positive benefits were short-lived.

I told her that I have seen many people with similar complaints, but that just treating the symptoms would not be sufficient to effect a true cure. Why was it that nothing that she tried had been effective? I was willing to bet that her blood pH was too acidic or too alkaline. This has far-reaching ramifications, as the blood ceaselessly flows to all the tissues of the body, bringing with it life-giving oxygen and nutrients, and taking away metabolic wastes. The blood flows to the mucosal cells that line the intestinal tract where the candida organisms live, as well as to the liver, the muscles, the heart and the brain. If the blood pH is out of balance, this will be mirrored in the other bodily fluids (such as the lymph and intracellular fluids), as well, potentially, in all the tissues and organs of the body.

I explained to this long-suffering woman that she needed to address the underlying metabolic imbalance that was disturbing the internal terrain of her body and "setting the stage" for the candida overgrowth. The body is constantly trying to compensate for the various metabolic stressors that it encounters, and it rarely makes mistakes. It is we who (often unwittingly) make the mistakes, by eating the wrong foods, not getting enough exercise and rest, and not properly managing stress and toxicity. Adjusting the diet to optimize blood pH (as well as making other intelligent lifestyle changes) will go a long way towards cleaning up the body's internal environment, so that it becomes much harder for disease conditions to flourish. Then our brain will function better, our endocrine system will be able to handle stress more effectively, the intestinal tract will digest our food better and become less hospitable to candida and other parasites, and the joints and muscles will be less susceptible to stiffness and discomfort.

Then when we use supplements like Candex for candida control, SAMe for fibromyalgia and arthritis, or pantothenic acid and l-histidine for allergies, they will work much more effectively than they could in an abnormal pH range. Until then, such supplements cannot be fully utilized; but when you are correctly metabolically typed and follow the appropriate dietary guidelines, the body can begin to balance and heal itself. This allows for a much more predictable treatment outcome.

As we have discussed in previous newsletters, many diseases originate in digestive disturbances, which are themselves usually secondary to blood pH imbalances. It may seem strange to you that optimizing blood pH can positively affect problems with digestion and assimilation of nutrients, but it is important to understand how optimizing blood pH can help optimize the pH of all the body's tissues and fluids. As goes the blood pH, so goes the rest of the body. It is not for nothing that the bloodstream has been universally revered as the river of life; but if it is not properly nourished, it can also become the river of death. As I told this anguished lady that evening in Las Vegas, I have seen many cases where diseases of all kinds, great and small, were alleviated and — in some cases — completely resolved by balancing the blood pH through Metabolic Typing. We are not talking about miracles here, but a commonsense approach to finding out what the body needs to balance its own internal terrain so it can more effectively heal itself.
---

The End is the Beginning
by Harold J. Kristal, D.D.S.

The late, great biochemist Roger Williams, Ph.D. introduced the concept of biochemical individuality into the lexicon of nutritional science, and, ever since, it has become increasingly well established that each and every one of us is unique in our biochemical makeup. But within that uniqueness certain patterns of commonality emerge that we refer to as the Metabolic Types. Based on the results of Metabolic Typing, a nutritional program can be initiated that can have the potential for bringing about significant and lasting changes in a person's health and well-being. It is estimated that it takes approximately fifty years for new scientific findings to gain widespread acceptance; let us hope that personalized metabolic nutrition will be embraced by the mainstream medical community in a much shorter time than that!

The most confounding enigma in our work is why certain foods acidify the blood of one individual but alkalize the blood of another. George Watson Ph.D painstakingly explained in his out-of-print classic, Nutrition and Your mind, how the process of oxidation renders certain foods acid forming and others alkaline forming. This occurs through the biochemical transmutations that nutrients undergo as they are processed through the Krebs cycle inside each of our cells. Even more perplexing is how the very same foods that alkalize the Oxidative types (Fast and Slow Oxidizers) acidify the Autonomic types (Sympathetics and Parasympathetics), and foods that acidify the Oxidative types alkalize the Autonomic types. When I first observed this phenomenon in one of my patients, it was a truly enlightening experience! While much is now understood about the role of the Krebs cycle in controlling the process of oxidation, less is known about autonomic dominance, or why foods have the opposite pH effect in the Autonomic types as they do in the Oxidative types. Nonetheless, this empirical finding represents a monumental breakthrough in the practice of nutrition, as well as having significant implications for the practice of medicine. Addressing the acidity or alkalinity of an individual's blood is of paramount importance in promoting the successful outcome of any imbalance or disease.

I come from a traditional medical background, which demands controlled double blind studies to validate empirical findings. Empiricism is the observation of clinical data, and the theoretical conclusions that are drawn from these observations. Sometimes the observations may be valid, but the conclusions based upon them may not be. At other times both the observations and the theoretical model may be accurate, but it might be challenging to confirm them scientifically, simply because not enough is known about the system in question.

This is the situation with the autonomic pathway of energy production. We do not know why autonomic dominance leads to foods having opposite effects on blood pH than oxidative dominance, but we are certain, based on many years of clinical experience, that this is indeed the case. For example, proteins and fats alkalize the Oxidative dominant types, but acidify the Autonomic types. Noting this phenomenon every day in my practice has validated it beyond a shadow of doubt in my own mind - true to the empirical approach. However, we are still unable to offer a scientific explanation for this phenomenon. Hopefully, as Metabolic Typing becomes more established, funds will be made available to conduct a rigorous scientific investigation of this enigma.

We are working with the some of the same metabolic markers as traditional medicine. Blood pH, oxidation, the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the nervous system, blood pressure, glucose tolerance, respiratory rates, the interplay between oxygen and carbon dioxide - all of these are part and parcel of the traditional medical world-view. There is no reason why the medical profession should be at odds with our protocols. They are simply not widely known or understood. My mission is to spread the word far and wide.

Nutrition picks up the ball where traditional medicine falls short. So many health problems can be corrected, or at least greatly alleviated, simply by knowing which are the right foods and supplements for any given individual. As nutritionists we do, of course, focus on the central role that nutrition plays in a person's overall health and longevity. But I would be remiss if I did not also mention other key areas that affect health. Two of these are stress and toxicity, both of which are known to exert wide-ranging negative effects on our bodies.

Diet alone may not always be entirely sufficient to achieve total bodily harmony in the face of ongoing emotional stress, or the onslaught of toxic chemicals from mercury fillings, environmental pollution, and the contamination of our food, water and the very air we breathe. Overwhelming though these factors may seem to be, we are not helpless in cleaning up our act. We can choose to feed ourselves and our families organically grown food, drink pure water, have toxic dental work removed, and exert pressure on our elected officials to clean up the environment. We can also stay physically active, exercise regularly and be sure to get plenty of rest and sleep. All of these simple activities are vital to good health. We also need to be sensible, and to seek proper medical advice when necessary. Above all, we must strive to maintain a positive mental outlook on life. Our stay on earth is brief, so let us enjoy it to the hilt, savor each moment and each day, and maximize our experience through the cultivation of radiant health.

The title of this essay, The End is the Beginning, is a phrase coined to point to the necessity of more research on Metabolic Typing. However much we know, there is always more that we do not know. It is inevitable that such research will happen, as Metabolic Typing represents the beginning of a new era in nutrition and medicine, one in which therapeutic protocols are specifically targeted to an individual's Metabolic Type. My own work has been to lay out a path for others to follow as they explore this fascinating new approach to nutrition.
---

Understanding the Dominance Factor
Newsletter December 1998

Metabolism is defined as the sum total of all chemical and electrical reactions that take place in an organism (subnuclear,nuclear,cell,tissue,organ,organism).

Oxidative and autonomic are but two of these metabolic systems in the human organism.

Oxidative is the speed that tissues of the body converts food to energy
a. Fast oxidizers - acid blood
b. Slow oxidizers - alkaline blood

Autonomic (neuro-hormonal response to converting food to energy)
a. Sympathetic - acid blood
b. Parasympathetic - alkaline blood

There is a specific response of an individual to foods and nutrients; either autonomicor oxidative that exerts itself consistently and systematically.

Metabolic type testing can determine whether you are oxidative (fast or slow) or autonomic (sympathetic or parasympathetic).

The dominance factor is understanding which metabolic category one is operating under.

There are three other imbalances that I check:

Anabolic - catabolic

Electrolyte stress - electrolyte insufficiency

Acidosis - alkalosis

A review of the three imbalances is as follows: (Based on the work of Guy Schenker)

Acidosis and Alkalosis: Acidosis and alkalosis imbalances always involve respiratory (lung) function and kidney function. (Acidosis and alkalosis imbalances are not to be confused with oxidative or autonomic blood pH imbalances).

Hypoventilation (too few breaths per minute) causes excess carbon dioxide (CO-2) and carbonic acid to be retained in the body, leading to acidosis. Hyperventilation (too many breaths per minute) expels carbon dioxide from the body faster than it can be produced. This decreases the levels of carbon dioxide and carbonic acid, leading to alkalosis. The kidneys attempt to compensate by excreting acid or alkaline urine, depending on whether acidity or alkalinity is prevalent in the blood.

Acidosis and alkalosis are primarily determined by breath holding capacity and respiratory rate and secondarily by urine pH.There are six different types of acidosis and alkalosis:

Respiratory acidosis or alkalosis

Metabolic acidosis or alkalosis

Potassium excess acidosis or potassium depletion alkalosis

The nutritional protocol for all forms of acidosis is sodium bicarbonate (baking soda).

The nutritional protocol for all forms of alkalosis is Phos Drops. Electrolyte Stress and Insufficiency

(Based on the work of Thomas M. Riddick)

An electrolyte is a mineral, suspended in a colloidal conducting solution that is capable of carrying an electrical charge. Electrolytes are able to conduct electricity because their mineral salts dissociate and separate out into electrically polarized ions. Electricity is the movement or exchange of electrons. Balanced electrolyte solutions can potentially enhance every tissue and cell function. The body's fluids are aqueous, negatively charged colloidal solutions. Negatively charged particles repel one another and therefore do not clump. Electrolyte Stress: This occurs when excessive electrolytes load the body fluids, leading to a lack of colloidal dispersion and, subsequently, flocculation (or clumping) of the body fluids. To counterbalance electrolyte stress, reduce the salt intake and drink more water.

Electrolyte Insufficiency: This occurs when either:

(a) there is insufficient salt intake (less than 5 grams daily), or;

(b) when certain biochemical imbalances reduce the retention of mineral salts, or;

(c) there is too high an intake of fluids, or

(d) as a complication of diabetes insipitus.

To counterbalance electrolyte insufficiency, increase salt intake and, if the specific gravity of the urine is 1.010 or less, drink less water.

Anabolic and Catabolic: (Based on the work of Emmanuel Revici)The two functions of anabolic and catabolic balance are:

Production of energy within the cells from oxygen

Control of cell membrane permeability

Cell membranes are primarily composed of two types of lipids (fats):

(1) Fatty acids (FA), composed of six carbon chain terminating in a negatively charged fatty acid pole: C-C-C-C-C-C-FA (-) (non-polar) (polar). (2) Sterols (S), composed of a six carbon chain terminating in a positively charged sterol pole: C-C-C-C-C-C-S (+)

(non-polar) (polar). The balance of these two lipids is essential for the proper utilization of oxygen within the cells for the production of energy, and for the control of cell membrane permeability (which allows nutrients to flow into, and wastes to flow out of, the cells). The fatty acid chain, including its non-polar end, stands in a vertical relationship (at a 90-degree angle) to the surface of the cell membrane. The sterol chain also stands in a vertical relationship (at a 90-degree angle) to the surface of the cell membrane, except for its non-polar end which bends horizontal (parallel) to the surface of the cell membrane.In the balanced state fatty acid and sterol chains alternate along the surface of the cell membrane.In a catabolic (or dysaerobic) imbalance fatty acid chains predominate, with a minimum of sterol chains, resulting in membranes that are not permeable enough ("clogged), thereby obstructing sufficient cellular respiration (inflow and outflow of nutrients, oxygen and wastes).

When working with an anabolic or catabolic imbalance, first correct the metabolic imbalance (oxidative or autonomic) through appropriate diet and supplementation.The following supplements are used to address anabolic and catabolic imbalances:

Anabolic ----------------------------- Catabolic
L-Carnitine -------------------------- Coenzyme Q-10 (Co. Q-10)
L-Methionine ------------------------- L-Histidine
L-Cysteine --------------------------- L-Lysine
L-Glutathione ------------------------ L-Arginine
Taurine ------------------------------ L-Glutamine
Glycine

Antioxidants should be restricted ****** Antioxidants are recommended

(E.g. Lipoic Acid, Pycnagenol, etc.)

Harold Kristal, DDS
---

Variations in Nutrition
Newsletter Septermber 1998

I would like to discuss the variations that exist today in nutrition. We have several brilliant researchers that are writing books about specific diets for all people. We have Pritikin, Ornish and McDougal who advocate a vegetarian diet for everyone. Then we have Sears who advocates a specific balance of proteins, carbohydrates and fats for everyone. Then we have Dr. Atkins who recommends a high protein, high fat diet for everyone. The latest book to come down the pike is D'Adamo's "Eating Right for Your Blood Type". These are all brilliant researchers. How is it that there is such a difference of opinion? It actually leaves John Q. Public bewildered as to which program they should follow. The confusion abounds universally.

The actual truth is that there is no one diet for everyone. We are all biochemically individualistic. It behooves all of us to understand the individual differences in ourselves, so we can enhance our health.

Bill Wolcott, who founded Healthexcel, and myself have founded a Metabolic Type Testing Program that can be tested for each individual as to which diet and supplements that are best for them. This did not happen overnight but took years of research and development on patients. After years of trial and error, we have surfaced with a testing procedure, which will give us a success rate of between 80 and 90 percent of all people we test. It also affords us the opportunity of helping people who could never be helped in the past by any medical protocol. Once we learn the imbalances of each person's make up, we can then began to address various systemic problems that they are encumbered with. We never treat the disease; we treat the person with the disease by correcting the imbalances. Doing this procedure alleviates the various disease systems. One of the most crucial imbalances we focus on is the oxidative and autonomic metabolic types. This particular imbalance is the granddaddy of all other imbalances. The acid-alkalinity of the blood has to be optimized so that micro and macro nutrients can be absorbed, assimilated and utilized into our tissues at the cellular level. After we balance oxidative and autonomic systems, we then look at balancing the electrolyte, anabolic, catabolic characteristics and the alkalosis acidosis imbalances in the tissues. This is very comprehensive testing, but once it is accomplished, then patients can achieve a higher level of wellness. I would like to give you an example of a little 15-year-old girl who went through our program. I have hundreds of examples such as this and in future newsletters I will include several case histories.

Jenna was a 15-year-old patient who came to our office with severe acne all over her body. She had active weeping pustules draining all over the surface of her body. She had this condition for 5 years and her parents had taken her to specialists all over the country to try and correct this problem. She was recommended to me by one of my patients. On the first visit her mother was very skeptical about our being able to help her daughter. After the first half-hour of testing I looked at the mother and told her that if her daughter would follow a fairly rigid dietary and supplemental regime, she would get well. Our testings are very thorough and time consuming; the process takes approximately two hours for the first visit.

Jenna was a shy, meek, lovely little girl but very inward. Her personality was one of being ashamed of how she looked. She simply could not function as a teenager. She was reappointed three weeks later to be reevaluated and tested. She had a 50 percent improvement at that time of the second visit. Both parents came with her and expressed their complete happiness over the results we had accomplished with their daughter. Four months later she was 90 percent cleared of all acne on her entire body. When she comes to my office now, her hair is combed and her face is made up beautifully. She is now an outgoing teenager without the embarrassment she previously experienced. This child could only be helped metabolically by understanding her particular imbalances. Once we properly addressed that situation, her acne problem cleared up immeasurably.

I hope you enjoyed this newsletter. I will be writing one every month and I will discuss our testing procedures and other case histories.

Harold Kristal, DDS
---

The G.I. Connection
Written by Dr. Harold Kristal and James Haig, NC

Some of the most common health complaints we hear from our clients are bloating, gas and constipation. To address these issues it is necessary to first correctly determine the person's Metabolic Type, to point them at foods that best serve their metabolism. It is also important to take a diet history to try to identify any specific offending foods. Metabolic Typing revolves around balancing the blood pH, which also directly affects the pH of the tissues. When food leaves the stomach, it has been acidified by hydrochloric acid (HCl) and other gastric juices, triggering a release of alkalizing agents (such as bicarbonates) in the duodenum, the first section of the small intestine. If the pH of the intestinal tract is either too acid or too alkaline, it will have a negative impact on the ability of the body to properly absorb and utilize our nutrients. I have found that balancing the pH of the blood will often result in a significant reduction or elimination of bloating, gas and constipation.

The key element in optimizing blood pH is the application of different diets for different Metabolic Types — the lower protein and fat, higher complex carbohydrate Group I diet, for the Slow Oxidizers and Sympathetics; and the higher protein and fat, lower complex carbohydrate Group II diet, for the Fast Oxidizers and Parasympathetics. If a Group I individual eats too much protein or fat, it can putrefy in the colon (large intestine), producing toxic by-products that can then be reabsorbed into the bloodstream and circulated around the body. If a Group II individual eats too many carbohydrates (even complex carbohydrates), they can ferment in the gut, producing another set of toxic by-products. Both scenarios can contribute to bloating, gas and other signs of indigestion, as well as to constipation or even diarrhea.

Even someone eating a metabolically balanced diet can experience these problems if they simply overeat, an all-too-common phenomenon that places a great burden on all the organs of digestion and elimination. Too much of even the best food is still too much, and brings its own "rewards" of bloating, gas and indigestion. Frequently, this process is accompanied by constipation, as the intestinal tract simply cannot handle the excess amount of food, leading to sluggish elimination. Chronic constipation leads to auto-intoxication, as toxins that are not flushed out quickly enough are reabsorbed. The best protection against constipation is to eat metabolically appropriate foods, to chew them thoroughly (to help break them down more effectively), to eat in a calm frame of mind and environment (which activates the parasympathetic branch of the nervous system, needed for proper digestion and elimination), and to be sure to eat plenty of fiber. Note that fiber comes almost exclusively from plant matter, so eat your veggies!

Sometimes, individuals adapting to the Group II diet will experience temporary digestive problems or constipation, simply because they have misinterpreted a higher protein and fat diet to mean that they do not have to eat many vegetables. However, metabolically appropriate vegetables should play a major role in both the Group I and the Group II diets, as they provide valuable fiber and important micro-nutrients. Fiber can also be ingested in the form of psyllium seeds or ground flax seeds (as in the Morning Energy Cocktail), while relief from constipation may also be provided by the herbal formula Aloe Lite, or by the powerful probiotic product Culturelle (more on that later).

Any food that is improperly broken down in the gastrointestinal (G.I.) tract has the potential to irritate the mucosa, the delicate cells that line the small and large intestines. Such irritation, if unchecked, can lead to various inflammatory or irritable bowel disorders such as "leaky gut" syndrome (more properly known as excessive intestinal permeability), Crohn's disease (inflammation of the small intestine and, sometimes, the colon), or colitis (inflammation of the colon). Eating foods that are right for one's Metabolic Type, maintaining digestive competence, and keeping the blood pH balanced will help to prevent such problems, or ameliorate them if they have already occurred.

Some individuals may, however, have a genetic or acquired sensitivity to a particular food, which may necessitate them avoiding it totally, or radically minimizing its consumption. The best known such food is gluten, which is most concentrated in the Northern European grains (wheat, rye, barley and oats, as well as spelt and kamut), and most commonly affects people who hail directly or indirectly from the British Isles or Scandinavia. If such an individual is eating a metabolically balanced diet, but is still having digestive difficulties, it may be prudent to ask their physician to perform a simple blood test for gluten sensitivity. Technically, it is not gluten per se that is the problem, as gluten is found in all grains, but a particular type of gluten known as alpha-gliadin. (Individuals with such sensitivities or other chronic digestive problems may wish to refer to Breaking the Vicious Cycle by Elaine Gottschall, Life Without Bread by Christian Allan and Wolfgang Lutz, and Digestive Wellness by Elizabeth Lipski).

Another major cause of digestive problems is an overgrowth of yeast (such as candida albicans) or pathogenic bacteria, a process collectively referred to as dysbiosis. This most commonly occurs in the small intestine, but it can happen anywhere along the G.I. tract. Dysbiosis can be caused by a variety of factors, ranging from unbalanced blood pH to insufficient stomach acid, and from antibiotic use to excess consumption of sugar and starches, which provide the ideal foods for the growth of pathogenic micro-organisms. The best solution for dysbiosis is a good quality probiotic, such as Culturelle, which selectively encourages the growth of the benign bacteria, or flora, helping them to crowd out the pathogenic organisms. Everyone can benefit from a course of Culturelle once or twice a year, regardless of whether or not they have digestive difficulties, to proactively maintain G.I. health.


Sources for more information and for free metabolic typing tests:
"Nutrition Solution: A Guide to Your Metabolic Type" by Harold J. Kristal, James M. Haig, and John R. Lee (http://www.amazon.com/Nutrition-Solution-Guide-Your-Metabolic/dp/1556434375/)  An excellent book that explains metabolic typing. Find a metabolic health practitioner near you by clicking on: http://meta-typing.com/bph/main.html
www.bloodph.com (Dr. Kristal's original website)
http://meta-typing.com/index.htm (newer website)
http://meta-typing.com/products.htm
http://meta-typing.com/Group%20I%20Foods...Fat%20Loss.pdf
http://meta-typing.com/GroupIDietSheet.pdf
http://meta-typing.com/Group%20II%20Foods...Fat%20Loss....pdf
http://meta-typing.com/GroupIIDietSheet.pdf
http://www.herbalroom.com/PDF/MTEXTART.pdf
Personalized Metabolic Nutrition Handbook - Kristal & Haig (used at their seminars)
1530 Fifth Ave, Suite A
San Rafael, CA 94901
General Information: pmn@meta-typing.com
Sales & Customer Support: sylvie@bloodph.com
800-772-0646

If you're interested in where metabolic typing originated, Dr. Kristal's formulas are based upon "Nutrition and Your Mind" by Watson (http://www.amazon.com/Nutrition-Your-Mind-Psychochemical-Response/dp/0060145250/). You can also refer to "Nutrition and Physical Degeneration" by Weston Price (http://www.amazon.com/Nutrition-Physical-Degeneration-Weston-Price/dp/0916764206/)

-

There is a lot of information about using vitamin C to help fight various diseases on my Latest page (http://www.distance-healer.com/Latest.html). Below are a couple of examples.

Reversing disease with the ‘multi-C’ protocol by Thomas E. Levy, MD, JD
http://www.naturalhealth365.com/vitamin_c/0929_multi_c_protocol.html

Rectal administration of sodium ascorbate is a method that can be used in emergencies, and in developing world circumstances, when IV is unavailable or unsuitable.
See "Rectal Vitamin C" on my Latest page (http://www.distance-healer.com/Latest.html) by searching for the article "Can Vitamin C Cure Ebola?" without the quotes (also at: http://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v10n13.shtml) for some additional information and dosages.

Note: See these articles on my Latest page (http://www.distance-healer.com/Latest.html) for more information about using Rectal Vitamin C Enemas instead of IVC / Intravenous Vitamin C:
Vitamin C flush=really effective-Please read! by quetar
http://curezone.com/forums/am.asp?i=1128904
Organic Coffee enemas/ Vitamin C?  [just modify this basic procedure for a Rectal Vitamin C Enema]
http://www.mdjunction.com/forums/lyme-disease-support-forums/general-support/3128956-organic-coffee-enemas-vitamin-c
The Coffee Enema Blog [just modify this basic procedure for a Rectal Vitamin C Enema]
http://coffee-enemas.blogspot.com/
Coffee Enema Directions [just modify this basic procedure for a Rectal Vitamin C Enema]
Posted in Colon Health, Health by Talya Meldy
http://www.clearwayhealth.com/blog/cofee-enema-directions/
Enema Bucket Kit http://www.sawilsons.com/enemaequip.htm

One Answer to Cancer, An ecological approach to the successful treatment of Malignancy, $12.00, SKU: E-BOOK
http://usastore.sawilsons.com/products/One-Answer-to-Cancer%2C-An-ecological-approach-to-the-successful-treatment-of-Malignancy-.html
We are very pleased and excited to be able to offer the downloadable E-book of Dr. Kelley's original manuscript "One Answer to Cancer, An ecological approach to the successful treatment of Malignancy". This book is available exclusively through s.a.Wilsons

Self Test for Different Metabolic types
http://usastore.sawilsons.com/products/Self-Test-for-Different-Metabolic-types.html
Dr. William Donald Kelley author of Self Test for Different Metabolic types, $29.99, SKU: KUS81
Metabolic Typing, Discovering Your Personal Nutritional Needs
Without knowing your metabolic type, you are guessing as to what foods and supplements you should take. This chapter explains how you can develop a personalized nutritional program that gives you the results you want.
A person may be following a program of the best foods, the best supplements, and plenty of exercise   but how does he or she know that those really are the best foods for them? Each of us is different and has a different metabolism.
Many of the world's leading scientists including, for instance, biochemist Dr. Roger Williams, author of many excellent and well-known books such as You Are Extraordinary, and Nobel Prize Winning Physicist, Dr. Linus Pauling, have proven this through their own research. [syn: metabolic typing test; metabolic typing self-test;]

-

The Metabolic Typing Diet: Customize Your Diet to Your Own Unique Body Chemistry by William Linz Wolcott
http://www.amazon.com/Metabolic-Typing-Diet-Customize-Chemistry/dp/0767905644/
http://www.healthexcel.com/
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2003/02/01/metabolic-typing-diet.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2002/12/18/metabolic-typing-part-one.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2002/12/28/metabolic-typing-part-two.aspx

Dr. Mercola's Total Health Program: The Proven Plan to Prevent Disease and Premature Aging, Optimize Weight and Live Longer by Joseph Mercola (contains a short metabolic typing test along with a full book of recipes with instructions on how to modify each one depending upon which MT type you are):
http://www.amazon.com/Dr-Mercolas-Total-Health-Program/dp/0970557469/
http://www.takecontrolofyourhealth.com/
www.mercola.com/mttest.htm
http://products.mercola.com/nutritional-typing/
http://www.mercola.com/nutritionplan/beginner.htm

Some excerpts from Dr. Mercola’s book: You, like all people, have a unique biochemistry, or “metabolic type.” There are specific foods, at specific levels, that are most ideal for your type. Conversely, some foods that are generally considered “healthy” may not be as healthy for you as you think. One of the important keys this book will help provide is learning your metabolic type and major metabolic typing principles so that you can both vastly and rapidly increase your dietary success.

A short online test (best to compare the results of this with another test or two to verify):
http://i.domaindlx.com/anilak/test.asp

Self Test for the Different Metabolic Types - Kelley (a comprehensive test) available from College Health Stores (888-477-3618) or
http://www.federalobserver.com/catalog/description.php?II=109
Another source: Dr. Kelley’s books, One Answer to Cancer and Dr. Kelley’s Self Test for The Different Metabolic Types, which includes the Metabolic Chart and an additional small booklet, Metabolic Typing, The Correct Nutrition for Your Body and his enzyme formulas including Formula PEP (formally Formula CA+) capsules, are available through this newsletter. (To order, call (800)651-7080 or go to www.road-to-health.com)

Dr. Schenker and the Nutri-Spec System of Metabolic Typing:
http://www.nutri-spec.net/keyconcepts.htm
http://www.royalrife.com/letters.html
http://www.royalrife.com/hbal.html

Online Metabolic Typing Free Self Tests:
http://www.naturalhealthyellowpages.com/metabolic/self_test.html
http://i.domaindlx.com/anilak/test.asp
http://www.arwellnessgroup.com/wellsurvey.php
http://www.wicklowtri.com/filemgmt_data/files/METABOLIC%20TYPING%20QUESTIONAIRE.doc
http://www.arwellnessgroup.com/wellsurvey.php
http://www.fordlandclinic.com/id27.htm
http://www.arwellnessgroup.com/surveyrecommend.pdf
http://www.arwellnessgroup.com/typesandsx.pdf
http://www.arwellnessgroup.com/typepandpx.pdf
http://www.arwellnessgroup.com/typeb.pdf
http://glycolady.com/survey.htm
http://glycolady.com/docs/DNA_Survey.pdf
http://glycolady.com/docs/DNA_SurveyRR.pdf
http://glycolady.com/docs/Type_B.pdf
http://glycolady.com/docs/Type_P.pdf
http://glycolady.com/docs/Type_S.pdf
http://www.wicklowtri.com/filemgmt_data/files/METABOLIC%20TYPING%20QUESTIONAIRE.doc

Online Metabolic Typing Self Test from Natural Health Yellow Pages:
http://www.naturalhealthyellowpages.com/metabolic/self_test.html
http://www.naturalhealthyellowpages.com/metabolic/carbotype.html
http://www.naturalhealthyellowpages.com/metabolic/proteintype.html
http://www.naturalhealthyellowpages.com/metabolic/mixedtype.html

Some articles about metabolic typing at Dr. Mercola's site:
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2000/04/02/vegetarian-myths.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2003/08/27/vegetarian-testimonial.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2003/07/16/rheumatoid-arthritis-part-eleven.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2006/11/28/the-secret-to-improving-your-health-that-virtually-no-one-appreciates.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2003/07/12/mediterranian-diet.aspx
http://www.mercola.com/article/diet/index.htm
http://www.mercola.com/nutritionplan/index.htm
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2002/12/18/metabolic-typing-part-one.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2002/12/28/metabolic-typing-part-two.aspx
http://www.mercola.com/forms/mtt_table.htm  (after determining your metabolic type, you can fine tune your diet with this)
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2002/12/07/diet-part-two.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2003/02/01/metabolic-typing-diet.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/2002/dec/18/metabolic_typing.htm
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2003/02/26/metabolic-typing-part-two.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2003/02/26/metabolic-typing-part-three.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2003/02/26/metabolic-typing-part-four.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2003/02/26/metabolic-typing-part-five.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2003/02/26/metabolic-typing-part-six.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2003/02/26/metabolic-typing-part-seven.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2003/02/26/metabolic-typing-part-eight.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/2003/feb/1/metabolic_typing_diet.htm
http://articles.mercola.com/2003/jan/8/native_climate.htm
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2003/05/14/genetic-type-diet.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/2003/feb/26/metabolic_typing.htm
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2003/03/22/oxidative-therapies.aspx
The body has two kinds of metabolism when it comes to oxygen: aerobic (with oxygen) and anaerobic (without oxygen). While it is true that certain infections, cancers and other adversities thrive in an anaerobic environment, it is not true that anaerobic is "bad" and that aerobic is "good" or that everyone should do whatever possible to increase oxygen and aerobic metabolism in the body.
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2004/06/19/toxic-metals-part-two.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2004/04/14/success-part-one.aspx
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2004/02/25/asthma-success.aspx

Dr. Kelley's Book -- "Cancer: Curing the Incurable Without Surgery, Chemotherapy, or Radiation" by William Donald Kelley and Fred Rohe
http://www.amazon.com/Cancer-Incurable-Without-Chemotherapy-Radiation/dp/0970429002/


Metabolic Nutrition Self-Test Kit

Metabolic Typing was originally created as a procedure to be administered by trained healthcare professionals. This still remains the preferred method, as it allows the individual to work face-to-face with a practitioner trained in all aspects of the process, who is best able to address the specific health needs of the individual.

However, not everyone lives close to a Metabolic Typing practitioner, or to our own Metabolic Nutrition Clinic in San Rafael, California. For such individuals, a simplified Personalized Metabolic Typing Self-Test Kit was developed for home use.

Although the Self-Test Kit does not  allow us to check as many metabolic markers or assess as many secondary imbalances as we would during an office visit, it does provides enough information for the staff of Personalized Metabolic Nutrition to determine your Metabolic Type. We can then recommend to you the appropriate diet and supplement protocol for your Metabolic Type.

Included in the Self-Test Kit are a blood glucose meter (glucometer) and test strips, pH papers, alcohol swabs, glucose and protein challenge powders, a Self-Test Chart, Questionnaire, and Medical History Form, and complete step-by-step instructions. The cost of the kit also includes analysis of one set of data, along with a report detailing dietary and supplement recommendations. The kit includes enough supplies for nine complete tests, except for the test strips used in the glucometer, which will need to be replaced through your local pharmacy after two tests (simply tell them the make and model of the glucometer). The Testing Chart, Questionnaire, and Medical History Form will also need to be photocopied if multiple tests are required.

The test is performed in the comfort of your own home, on an empty stomach. Most people find it convenient to perform the test in the morning, before eating any food or drinking anything other than water. Approximately three hours is required, though there is much down-time between the various testing cycles. After filling out the Testing Chart, simply  fax or mail us your results for analysis (we suggest you keep a copy of the Testing Chart for your own records). We will then provide you with the analysis of your Metabolic Type, along with our recommendations for the diet and supplements appropriate to your metabolism.

Follow-up tests (which are recommended approximately 30 days after implementing the suggested dietary program) and tests for additional family members may be purchased for $45.00 each.

Note that the Self-Test may cause temporary diarrhea or fatigue in some sensitive individuals. Generally these symptoms subside after eating food, drinking more fluids, or within 24 hours or less.

Please note that the Self-Test Kit is not intended to diagnose or treat any disease, nor is it a substitute for proper medical advice or intervention. Individuals with a known or suspected health condition are strongly encouraged to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare professional. The Self-Test Kit is a tool designed to help determine the individual's Metabolic Type so that appropriate nutritional advice may then be given.

 Note also that Type I diabetics should not use the Self-Test Kit (see FAQs for more information).

Frequently Asked Questions About the Self-Test Kit
http://www.bloodph.com/faqs.html

How long will it take to receive my Self-Test Kit?
The Self-Test Kit is usually shipped within 24 hours of receiving the order. Depending on your geographic location, it should take approximately three to ten days to reach you after shipping.

How easy is it to perform the Self-Test?
The Self-Test involves a series of simple tests that are fully explained in the accompanying instructions. These tests include taking simple blood sugar readings (with the enclosed glucometer), checking your respiration rate and breath holding capacity, measuring urine and saliva pH, asking yourself a series of simple questions, and recording the data on the enclosed Self-Test Chart. The instructions guide you step-by-step through each stage of the testing process.

How long will it take for me to receive my analysis and report?
Please allow two weeks to receive your report, although usually the reports are analyzed within 3-4 days of their receipt.

What is included in the price of the Self-Test Kit?
The price of the Self-Test Kit includes all the materials needed to perform the test (glucose meter, test strips, pH papers, glucose and protein challenge powders, a Self-Test Chart, Questionnaire, and Medical History Form), as well as step-by-step written instructions. The price of the Self-Test Kit also includes analysis of one set of data, along with a report detailing dietary and supplement recommendations. The kit includes enough supplies for nine complete tests, except for the test strips used in the glucometer, which will need to be replaced through your local pharmacy after two tests.

Can I order my nutritional supplements from you?
Any of the supplements we recommend for you can be ordered from our clinic (through our website, or by phone, fax, or e-mail) and shipped to you by UPS. Some of these are proprietary formulas manufactured to our own specifications for the different Metabolic Types, while others are more generic and may be purchased elsewhere, if desired.

Can diabetics use the Self-Test Kit?
Type I diabetics should not use the Self-Test Kit, as the Self-Test centers around a glucose challenge. Not only would the glucose be potentially harmful to Type I diabetics, but injected insulin would negate the glucose challenge itself. Type II diabetics (non-insulin dependent) may use the test at their own discretion, and at the discretion of their primary healthcare provider; however, we recommend that they only use 1/3 of the normally recommended amount of Glucose Challenge Powder (and they should clearly note this on the Self-Test Chart).

Further information on Metabolic Typing and diabetes is found in The Nutrition Solution: A Guide to Your Metabolic Type (North Atlantic Books) by Harold J. Kristal, D.D.S. and James M. Haig, N.C. (to order, click here). Another book we highly recommend for all diabetics (including Type I diabetics) is Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution (Little Brown), by Richard K. Bernstein, MD, himself a Type I diabetic.

Can people with acute or chronic illnesses use the Self-Test Kit?
People with acute illnesses (such as colds or infections) should wait until they are better. People with chronic illnesses (other than Type I diabetics) can use the Self-Test Kit at their own discretion and the discretion of their primary healthcare provider. Note that in some sensitive individuals, the Self-Test may cause temporary diarrhea or fatigue. Generally these symptoms subside within 24 hours, or sooner.

FAQs:
I’m a Type II diabetic. Can you still determine my metabolic type?
Yes. Depending on your fasting blood sugar, we can adjust the amount of the glucose challenge drink. In some cases, the glucose is not administered; instead a high quality protein is used. We can determine your metabolic type just as accurately this way. We also have a specific diabetic protocol for recommended foods and supplements.

*See info on Type I diabetes under Self-Test Kit.

How is your diet different from all the others out there?
Metabolic typing is a system that is based on your individual metabolism. The food plan and supplements suggested complement the way in which your system optimally utilizes specific foods. There is no such thing as a “universal diet.” The only diet that is healthy for you is the one that is right for your metabolic type.

For example, just because a lemon is acidic in nature doesn’t necessarily mean that it will create an acidic blood pH. It may, in fact, alkalize your blood pH depending on your metabolic type.

How long will it take for me to lose weight?
Metabolic typing does not strictly follow the conventional weight charts as we believe that a thin person can be completely imbalanced metabolically, whereas someone else who is somewhat overweight can be operating optimally on all levels. Your body will find its natural healthy weight as you become balanced. Our goal is to find the underlying cause of weight gain, high blood sugar, hormonal imbalance, poor digestion, chronic illness, etc., as we see excess weight as a symptom of metabolic imbalance.  In general, on our weight loss program, women can expect to lose 1-2 pounds per week, and men 2-3 pounds per week. We closely monitor body composition to make sure that you're losing fat and not muscle.

Often we find that “overweight” people are actually starving for the right nutrients that will balance the metabolic rate and better aid in converting food into energy instead of storing it as fat.  

A few years ago fat grams and cholesterol rich foods were the enemy. Now everyone is counting carbs. Isn’t there a right diet for everyone?

Everyone is biochemically unique. That is why some diets work for some and not for others. Metabolic Typing removes the guesswork, formulating a diet and supplement regime that specifically work to fit your individual metabolism.
---

Dr. Kristal's (Personalized Metabolic Nutrition, http://meta-typing.com) Formulas I and II are the primary multi-vitamin/mineral supplements used in the initial balancing phase for the Group I and II Metabolic Types, respectively. Each formula is intentionally restricted to the vitamins and minerals most suitable for helping to “drive” the individual towards Metabolic balance.  

• Formulated according to the principles outlined by George Watson, Ph.D. in his classic work Nutrition and Your Mind. (I have included these formulas because they give examples of the desired forms of vitamins and minerals perferred for each metabolic type)

• Formula I contains vitamins and minerals selected to help balance Slow Oxidizers and Sympathetics • These nutrients help acidify the overly alkaline Slow Oxidizers and alkalize the overly acidic Sympathetics

• Formula II contains vitamins and minerals selected to help balance Fast Oxidizers and Parasympathetics

• These nutrients help alkalize the overly acidic Fast Oxidizers and acidify the overly alkaline Parasympathetics

• Supplements from the opposite group can exacerbate a pH imbalance in the same way that certain foods can

• In certain cases, the Group I version of a particular nutrient (e.g. beta carotene, niacin and ascorbic acid) appears in Formula I while the Group II version of the same nutrient (e.g. vitamin A, niacinamide and calcium ascorbate) appears in Formula II

• After the initial balancing phase, which typically lasts 2-3 months, it is recommended that individuals switch to Balanced Multi

• Suggested dose is six capsules daily, in divided doses taken with meals

Formula I (Carb Types)
Supplement Facts
Serving Size 6 Vegetarian Capsules • Servings Per Container 30
Amount Per Serving % DV
Vitamin A (as beta carotene) 12,000 iu 240%
Vitamin C (as ascorbic acid) 1,000 mg 1667%
Vitamin D3 500 iu 125%
Thiamin (as thiamin mononitrate) 25 mg 1667%
Riboflavin 25 mg 1471%
Niacin 20 mg 100%
Vitamin B6 (as pyrodoxine hydrochloride) 25 mg 1250%
Folic Acid 400 mcg 100%
Biotin 200 mcg 67%
Magnesium (as magnesium aspartate) 150 mg 38%
Copper (as copper aspartate) 1 mg 50%
Manganese (as manganese aspartate) 5 mg 250%
Chromium (as chromium Nicotinate) 100 mcg 83%
Potassium (as potassium aspartate) 99 mg 3%
PABA (para-aminobenzoic acid) 100 mg *
* Daily value not established
Other ingredients: cellulose, magnesium stearate

Formula II (Protein Types)
Supplement Facts
Serving Size 6 Capsules • Servings Per Container 30
Amount Per Serving % DV
Vitamin A (as vitamin A palmitate) 10,000 iu 200%
Vitamin C (as calcium ascorbate) 1,000 mg 1667%
Vitamin E (as d-alpha tocopheryl 200 iu 667%
acid succinate)
Vitamin B3 (as niacinamide) 100 mg 500%
Vitamin B12 (as cyanocobalamin) 100 mcg 1667%
Pantothenic Acid (as calcium 100 mg 1000%
pantothenate)
Calcium (as calcium ascorbate / 500 mg 50%
phosphate / citrate)
Phosphorus (as calcium phosphate) 40 mg 4%
Iodine (as sea kelp) 150 mcg 100%
Zinc (as zinc citrate) 10 mg 67%
Choline (as choline bitartrate) 50 mg *
Inositol 50 mg *
* Daily value not established
Other ingredients: cellulose and magnesium stearate

Balanced Multi (formerly called "Formula III"), Our most popular multi-vitamin/mineral formula is recommended for people of all Metabolic Types who have gone through the initial balancing phase using Formula I or II. It is also recommended for individuals with malabsorption or other intestinal conditions, diabetes, cancer, or any other advanced degenerative disease, or for anyone suffering from general debility.

• The revised Balanced Multi contains more of the highly bioavailable co-enzyme forms of several B-vitamins, such as riboflavin 5- phosphate and methylcobalamin

• The amounts of several key components have been increased, such as folic acid (800 mcg), B-12 (250 mcg), vitamin D3 (400 iu), boron (3 mg) and selenium (200 mcg)

• Vitamin K (100 mcg) and copper (2 mg) have been added

• Chromium has been upgraded to the more bioavailable Chromate™ form (chromium polynicotinate) and citrate has been added as one of the carriers for magnesium

• We have removed PABA, a common allergen, as well as choline which has a somewhat fishy odor, and which recent research suggests is best absorbed as phosphatidyl choline (as found in PMN’s Neptune Krill Oil) rather than as the potentially toxic free choline

• Formula Balanced Multi contains a 50:50 ratio of the Group I and Group II versions of certain nutrients (e.g. vitamin B-3 as niacin and niacinamide, vitamin C as ascorbic acid and calcium ascorbate, vitamin A as palmitate and beta carotene) as well as balanced Group I and II mineral carriers (e.g. aspartate and citrate)

• As with all PMN supplements (except Neptune Krill Oil), Balanced Multi is encapsulated in vegetarian capsules

• Suggested dose is six capsules daily, in divided doses taken with meals; more or less may be taken as desired

• The price remains unchanged despite the upgrades: Balanced Multi (180 Capsules) Item # PMN 103

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Balanced Multi
Supplement Facts
Serving Size 6 Vegetarian Capsules • Servings Per Container 30
Amount Per Serving % DV
Vitamin A (50% palmitate/ 50% beta-carotene) 10,000 iu 200%
Vitamin C (50% ascorbic acid/ 50% calcium ascorbate) 1,000 mg 1670%
Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) 400 iu 100%
Vitamin E (d-alpha tocopheryl succinate) 200 iu 670%
Vitamin K (phytonadione) 100 mcg 125%
Vitamin B1 (thiamin HCl) 50 mg 3335%
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin/ riboflavin 5-phosphate) 25 mg 1470%
Vitamin B3 (niacin/ niacinamide) 100 mg 500%
Vitamin B5 (calcium pantothenate) 250 mg 2500%
Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine/pyridoxal 5-phosphate) 50 mg 2500%
Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin/ methylcobalamin) 250 mcg 4170%
Folic acid 800 mcg 200%
Biotin 300 mcg 100%
Calcium (citrate/ ascorbate/ pantothenate) 250 mg 25%
Magnesium (aspartate/ ascorbate/ citrate) 250 mg 65%
Potassium (aspartate) 99 mg 4%
Zinc (Optizinc™) 20 mg 135%
Selenium (selenomethionine) 200 mcg 285%
Iodine (as kelp) 75 mcg 50%
Manganese (aspartate) 5 mg 250%
Chromium (Chromate™) 200 mcg 170%
Molybdenum (chelate) 50 mcg 70%
Copper (sebacate) 2 mg 100%
Inositol 50 mg *
Vanadium (vanadyl sulfate) 25 mcg *
Boron (citrate) 3 mg *
Other ingredients: cellulose and magnesium stearate

PMN also offers a self-test kit for $210 that tests your responses to glucose and protein challenge drinks. You also record your pulse, respiration rate, answer a short questionnaire, and return the results to PMN for interpretation of your major and minor metabolic types and advice. For more information and to order the self-test kit or supplements, contact them at 800-772-0646, 1530 Fifth Ave, Suite A, San Rafael, CA 94901, General Information: pmn@meta-typing.com, Sales & Customer Support: sylvie@bloodph.com, Website: http://www.meta-typing.com/


HealthExcel Supplements (per Dr. Wolcott) as examples of which nutrients and forms benefit each of the metabolic types: https://www.metabolictypingonline.com/SuppliesAndSupp.aspx

In the US call 1-800-323-3842 to order or visit: http://www.ultralifeinc.com/Metabolic.asp
To order in Europe visit: http://www.mt-order.com/

Adrenovive - Natural nutritional support for the adrenal glands*.
Each capsule supplies 100 mg. Astragalus (root), 75 mg. Eleuthroccus senticosus (0.8% elrutherosides E&B), 50 mg. Licorice Root (standardized 2% glycyrrhizin), 75 mg. Pantethine Octahydrate, 30 mg. Pantothenic Acid, 200 mg. Schizandra, 10 mg. Vitamin B-6 (as Pyridoxal 5 Phosphate), 40 mg. Vitamin C (as Ascorbic Acid), 60 mg. Vitamin C (as Calcium Ascorbate), 5 mg. Zinc Monomethionine. 60 capsules

AO-Max - Optimal anti-oxidant formulation*. Each capsule supplies Carnosine 150 mg., Cat's Claw 50 mg., Co-Enzyme Q-10 50 mg., Folic Acid 300 mcg., Grape Seed Extract 50 mg., Green Tea Catechins 100 mg., Lutein 6 mg., Lycopene 3 mg., Mixed Carotenoids 390 mg., Quercetin 50 mg., Rosemary 50 mg., Rutin 50 mg., Selenium (as Selenomethionine) 35 mcg., Silymarin 50 mg., Tocotrienols (Palm) 20 mg., Vitamin B-12 (as Cobalamin) 300 mcg., Vitamin E (as Mixed Tocopherols) 50 I.U.  90 capsules

Cardiovive - Natural nutritional support for the heart and cardiovascular system*. Each tablet supplies 175 mg. of Heart Concentrate, Hawthorn 20 mg., Cayenne 10 mg.  90 tablets

Clear A.M. - Natural nutritional support for the brain and central nervous system and all of their functions, including memory, mental clarity, concentration, etc*. Best taken in the morning. Two (2) capsules supply Acetyl L-Carnitine 160 mg., Alpha Lipoic Acid 50 mg., Co-Enzyme Q-10 50 mg., GPC 50% (Glycerophosphocholine) 400 mg., L-Taurine 100 mg.  60 capsules

Clear P.M. - Natural nutritional support for the brain and central nervous system and all of their functions, including memory, mental clarity, concentration, etc*. Best taken in the evening. Two (2) capsules supply Acetyl L-Carnitine 160 mg., Alpha Lipoic Acid 50 mg., L-Taurine 330 mg., Phosphatidyl Serine 200 mg. 60 capsules

DHM-1 - Natural nutritional support believed to assist the body in its natural efforts of detoxification. May be of particular help to the body regarding chemicals and heavy metals*. Best when used in conjunction with DHM-2. Each capsule supplies Alpha Lipoic Acid 50 mg., Beta Sitosterol 35 mg., Citrus Bioflavonoids 50 mg., Freeze-Dried Garlic 180 mg., L-Isoleucine 75 mg., L-Leucine 150 mg., L-Methionine 100 mg., L-Valine 150 mg., Pectin 100 mg., Sodium Alginate 210 mg.  90 capsules

DHM-2 - Natural nutritional support believed to assist the body in its natural efforts of detoxification. May be of particular help to the body regarding mercury*. Best when used in conjunction with DHM-1. Each capsule supplies Chlorella 500 mg., MSM (Methyl Sulfonyl Methane) 250 mg., Cilantro 250 mg., Cellulase (500 CU) 100 mg.  180 capsules

Digestaid 1 - Support for deficiencies in hydrochloric acid production and to support digestion in the Sympathetic Dominant and Slow Oxidizer*. Each tablet supplies Betaine HCL 454 mg., Potassium Chloride 65 mg., Glutamic Acid HCL 195 mg., Pepsin (1:20,000) 22 mg. 90 tablets

Digestaid 2 - Support for deficiencies in hydrochloric acid production and to support digestion in the Parasympathetic Dominant and Fast Oxidizer*. Each tablet supplies Betaine HCL 454 mg., Ammonium Chloride 65 mg., Glutamic Acid HCL 194 mg., Pepsin (1:20,000) 22 mg. 90 tablets

Digestaid 3 - Support for deficiencies in hydrochloric acid production and to support digestion in the Balanced Autonomic Dominant and Mixed Oxidizer Dominant*. Each tablet supplies; Betaine HCL 454 mg., Ammonium Chloride 32 mg., Potassium Chloride 32 mg., Glutamic Acid HCL 194 mg., Pepsin (1:20,000) 22 mg. 90 tablets

EFA MT - Vegetarian source of essential fatty acids in a 1:1 ratio of Omega 3 to Omega 6. Certified Organic and Hexane-free. Each capsule contains 1000 mg. of a proprietary blend of: Flax Seed Oil, Sunflower Seed Oil (High Oleic), Pumpkin Seed Oil, and Flax Seed Particulates.  90 capsules

Enzaid 1 - Non-animal digestive enzyme blend, specifically designed to support the diet of Carbo Types, Sympathetic Dominants and Slow Oxidizers*. Proprietary Blend 300 mg of the following enzymes: Protease, Bromelain, Amylase, Lipase, Cellulase, Lactase, Phytase, Maltase, Hemicellulose, Invertase, Galactase, Xylanase, Whole Papaya and Amla. This special formula has a digestive utilization pH range of 3 to 9.  90 capsules

Enzaid 2 - Non-animal digestive enzyme blend, specifically designed to support the diet of “Protein Types”: Parasympathetic Dominants and Fast Oxidizers*. Proprietary Blend 300 mg of the following enzymes: Protease, Bromelain, Amylase, Lipase, Cellulase, Lactase, Phytase, Maltase, Hemicellulose, Invertase, Galactase, Xylanase, Whole Papaya and Amla. This special formula has a digestive utilization pH range of 3 to 9.  90 capsules

Enzaid 3 - Non-animal digestive enzyme blend, specifically designed to support the diet of “Mixed Types”: Balanced Autonomic Dominants and Mixed Oxidizer Dominants*. Proprietary Blend 300 mg of the following enzymes: Protease, Bromelain, Amylase, Lipase, Cellulase, Lactase, Phytase, Maltase, Hemicellulose, Invertase, Galactase, Xylanase, Whole Papaya and Amla. This special formula has a digestive utilization pH range of 3 to 9.  90 capsules

Glucorrect - Natural nutritional support for glucose metabolism and regulation. May be of particular interest for anyone with either high or low blood sugar*. Each capsule supplies 200 mcg. Chromium GTF, 200 mg. Bitter Melon, 20 mg. Cinnamon, 40 mg. Goat’s Rue (20% Guanylhydrazine), 150 mg. Gymnema Sylvestre, 20 mg. N-Acetyl Cysteine, 35 mg. Quercetin, 1 mg. Vanadium (as Vanadyl Sulfate), 10 IU. Vitamin E (as d-alpha tocopheryl succinate), 10 IU. Vitamin E (as Mixed Tocopherols).  90 capsules

JLT-Max - Natural nutritional support for joints, ligaments, tendons and all connective tissues*. Each capsule supplies Boswellia 150 mg., Glucosamine Sulfate 210 mg., MSM (Methyl Sulfonyl Methane) 450 mg., Turmeric 60 mg., Vitamin C (as Calcium Ascorbate) 40 mg.  90 capsules

LK-Plus - Natural nutritional support for the liver and kidneys*. Each capsule supplies Artichoke 50 mg., Beet Root 175 mg., Calcium D-Glucarate 110 mg., Dandelion Root 90 mg., Greet Tea Catechins 50 mg., L-Arginine 90 mg., L-Methionine 90 mg., Parsley Leaf 90 mg., Silymarin 40 mg., Stinging Nettle 85 mg., Anhydrous TMG (Trimethylglycine) 100 mg., Turmeric 130 mg.  90 capsules

MT Balance - Full-spectrum vitamin and mineral formulation, provided to assure daily intake of all vital nutrients and to serve as a foundation for the specific metabolic type formulations*. Because no nutrient acts independently, but rather in synergistic concert with other nutrients, it is critical for success that one is assured of adequate daily intake of all available nutrients*. Each three tablets* supplies: Vitamins: Vitamin A 7,500 I.U., Vitamin B-1 7 mg., Vitamin B-2 8 mg., Vitamin B-3 4 mg., Vitamin B-5 23 mg., Vitamin B-6 10 mg., Vitamin B-12 68 mcg., Beta Carotene 2,500 I.U., Bioflavonoids 60 mg., Biotin 52 mcg., Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid) 160 mg., Vitamin C (Calcium Ascorbate) 10 mg., Choline 40 mg., Vitamin D-3 210 I.U., Vitamin E (D Alpha Tocopherols) 30 I.U., Vitamin E (Mixed Tocopherols) 20 I.U., Folic Acid 300 mcg., Vitamin K 90 mcg., Inositol 20 mg., Niacinamide 28 mg., PABA 6 mg. Minerals: Boron 300 mcg., Calcium 60 mg., Chromium 80 mcg., Copper 300 mcg., Iodine 30 mcg., Iron 3.5 mg., Magnesium 25 mg., Manganese 8 mg., Molybdenum 70 mcg., Potassium 12 mg., Selenium 15 mcg., Silicon 2 mcg., Vanadium 10 mcg., Zinc 10 mg. *contains only nutrients derived from plant sources produced by a unique growing process.  90 tablets

Omega MT - EPA and DHA from the finest and purest fish oils available*. Each capsule contains 1000 mg of Omega 3 from fish oils which yields 180 mg. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 120 mg. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).  90 capsules

Oxi-1 MT - Specific MT formulation for the Slow Oxidizer Dominant, designed to increase the Oxidation Rate*. Creation of this proprietary and unique formulation carefully considered not only specific nutrients, but equally important, matched the specific nutrient carriers to the intended metabolic effect on both the target system as well as body pH. The combination of these elements makes this formulation unique and incredibly effective for its purpose*. Each capsule contains: Vitamins: 1000 I.U. A, 1 mg. B1, 1.5 mg. B2, 10 mg. B3, 1.5 mg. B6, 700 mcg. Biotin, 125 mg. C, 170 mcg. D3, 45 mcg. Folic Acid, 30 mcg. K, 20 mg. PABA, 10 mg. Pantethine. Minerals: 150 mcg. Chromium, 50 mcg. Copper, 1 mg. Iron, 70 mg. Magnesium, 5.4 mg. Manganese, 100 mg. Potassium, 100 mcg. Vanadium. Amino Acids: 10 mg. L-Alanine, 10 mg. L-Aspargine, 15 mg. L-Glutamic Acid, 9 mg. L-Glutamine, 1 mg. L-Glutathione, 6 mg. L-Histidine, 10 mg. L-Proline, 15 mg. L-Serine. Misc.: 15 mg. Betaine, 10 mg. L-Malic Acid.  90 capsules

Oxi-2 MT - Specific MT formulation for the Fast Oxidizer Dominant, designed to decrease the Oxidation Rate*. Creation of this proprietary and unique formulation carefully considered not only specific nutrients, but equally important, matched the specific nutrient carriers to the intended metabolic effect on both the target system as well as body pH. The combination of these elements makes this formulation unique and incredibly effective for its purpose*. Each capsule contains: Vitamins: 2500 I.U. A, 40 mg. B3, 20 mg. B5, 400 mcg. B12, 157 mg. C, 60 mg. Choline, 42 I.U., E, 30 mg. Inositol, 20 mg. Intrinsic Factor. Minerals: 118 mg. Calcium, 50 mcg. Iodine, 62 mg. Phosphorus, 7 mg. Zinc. Amino Acids: 35 mg. L-Carnitine, 22 mg. L-Isoleucine, 46 mg. L-Leucine, 34 mg. L-Lysine, 26 mg. L-Phenylalanine, 7 mg. L-Tryptophane, 22 mg. L-Threonine, 19 mg. L-Tyrosine. Misc.: 15 mg. Betaine, 15 mg. Quercetin, 35 mg. RNA, 15 mg. Rutin.  90 capsules

Para MT - Specific MT formulation for the Parasympathetic Dominant, designed to support the parasympathetic system and strengthen the sympathetic system*. Creation of this proprietary and unique formulation carefully considered not only specific nutrients, but equally important, matched the specific nutrient carriers to the intended metabolic effect on both the target system as well as body pH. The combination of these elements makes this formulation unique and incredibly effective for its purpose*.
Each capsule supplies Vitamin B-1 500 mcg., Vitamin B-2 2 mg., Vitamin B-3 20 mg., Vitamin B-5 30 mg., Vitamin B-12 400 mcg., Vitamin C 131 mg., Calcium 95 mg., Phosphorus 29 mg., Magnesium 10 mg., Chromium 50 mcg., L-Glycine 25 mg., L-Glutamine 10 mg., L-Glutamic Acid 10 mg., L-Phenylalanine 20 mg., L-Tyrosine 35 mg., Betaine 10 mg., Coenzyme Q-10 10 mg., Quercetin 20 mg., Rutin 20 mg.Quercetin 10 mg.  90 capsules

Pro-Bio Max - Probiotic formulation to support health of the intestinal flora*. Each capsule contains 90 mg of a proprietary probiotic blend supplying a total of 12.5+ billion CFU's of the following microorganisms: Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium infantis, Bifidobacterium longum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus case, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus salivarius, Streptococcus thermophilus. Other ingredients: Inulin base derived from chicory root, polysaccharide complex, Vcaps vegetarian capsule, L-leucine and water. 60 capsules

Prostaclear - Natural nutritional support for the prostate*. Each tablet supplies 200 mg. of Prostate Concentrate in a base of Cleaver 10 mg., Juniper 50 mg., Pygeum Bark 15 mg., Saw Palmetto 100 mg., Thuja 25 mg.  90 tablets

Sym MT - Specific MT formulation for the Sympathetic Dominant, designed to support the sympathetic system and strengthen the parasympathetic system*. Creation of this proprietary and unique formulation carefully considered not only specific nutrients, but equally important, matched the specific nutrient carriers to the intended metabolic effect on both the target system as well as body pH. The combination of these elements makes this formulation unique and incredibly effective for its purpose*. Each capsule supplies Vitamin B-1 2 mg., Vitamin B-2 2.5 mg., Vitamin B-3 10 mg., Vitamin B-6 15 mg., Vitamin C 179 mg., Vitamin K 7.5 mcg., Chromium 7 mcg., Magnesium 40 mg., Manganese 10 mg., Potassium 70 mg., Silica (Horsetail) 5 mg., Vanadium 1 mcg., Zinc 3 mg., L-Alanine 10 mg., L-Arginine 10 mg., L-Isoleucine 15 mg., L-Leucine 10 mg., L-Lysine 10 mg., L-Ornithine 20 mg., L-Serine 10 mg., Betaine 15 mg., Coenzyme Q-10 10 mg., Quercetin 10 mg.  90 capsules

Supergreen 1 - All natural food ingredient “superfood” balanced specifically for “Carbo” Types, Sympathetic Dominants and Slow Oxidizers*. Each 500 mg. tablet contains a proprietary blend Chlorella, Spirulina, Alfalfa, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Purple Dulse, Beet Root, Spinach Leaf, Acerola, Lemon Peel, Orange Peel, Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, Arrowroot.  180 tablets

Supergreen 1 Powder - All natural food ingredient “superfood” balanced specifically for “Carbo” Types, Sympathetic Dominants and Slow Oxidizers*. Contains a proprietary blend Chlorella, Spirulina, Alfalfa, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Purple Dulse, Beet Root, Spinach Leaf, Acerola, Lemon Peel, Orange Peel, Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, Arrowroot. 16 oz. powder

Supergreen 2 - All natural food ingredient “superfood” balanced specifically for “Protein” Types, Parasympathetic Dominants and Fast Oxidizers*. Each 500 mg. tablet contains a proprietary blend Chlorella, Spirulina, Alfalfa, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Purple Dulse, Beet Root, Spinach Leaf, Acerola, Lemon Peel, Orange Peel, Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, Arrowroot.  90 tablets

Supergreen 2 Powder - All natural food ingredient “superfood” balanced specifically for “Protein” Types, Parasympathetic Dominants and Fast Oxidizers*. Contains a proprietary blend Chlorella, Spirulina, Alfalfa, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Purple Dulse, Beet Root, Spinach Leaf, Acerola, Lemon Peel, Orange Peel, Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, Arrowroot 90 tablets

Supergreen 3 - All natural food ingredient “superfood” balanced specifically for “Mixed” Types, Balanced Autonomic Dominants and Mixed Oxidizer Dominants*. Each 500 mg. tablet contains a proprietary blend Chlorella, Spirulina, Alfalfa, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Purple Dulse, Beet Root, Spinach Leaf, Acerola, Lemon Peel, Orange Peel, Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, Arrowroot.  90 tablets

Supergreen 3 Powder - All natural food ingredient “superfood” balanced specifically for “Mixed” Types, Balanced Autonomic Dominants and Mixed Oxidizer Dominants*. Contains a proprietary blend Chlorella, Spirulina, Alfalfa, Barley Grass, Wheat Grass, Purple Dulse, Beet Root, Spinach Leaf, Acerola, Lemon Peel, Orange Peel, Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, Arrowroot. 16 oz. powder

Thyrovive - Natural, nutritional support for the thyroid*. Each capsule contains 150 mcg Iodine*, 50 mcg. Selenium (as Selenomethionine), 25 mcg. Rubidium, 100 mg. L-Tyrosine, 20 mcg. Superoxide Dismutase, 40 mcg. Catalase. *from Bladderwrack, Dulse, Irish Moss, Kelp.  60 capsules



 
 
  Site Map